At Ralph Lamb’s funeral service, Sheriff Joe Lombardo hails his wisdom

Hundreds turned out to bid farewell to Nevada’s a lot of influential lawman.

Former Clark County Constable Ralph Lamb’s funeral lasted just over an hour Friday afternoon at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 10550 W. Alta Dr. Internment was scheduled to follow instantly at Memory Gardens Cemetery, 7251 W. Lone Mountain Road.

Among those who honored Lamb, who died recently at the age of 88, was existing Sheriff Joe Lombardo. The more youthful lawman described the elder as a brand-new buddy.

“Sheriff Lamb had a great sense of humor and would constantly share terrific wisdom and was still concerned about all things excellent and wicked,” Lombardo said.

Considered by many to be one of the most effective guys in the state during the 1970s, Lamb converted the Clark County Constable’s Department from a mainly rural force to an advanced urban firm. He was largely accountable for its 1973 consolidation with the Las Vegas Authorities Department into the present Metropolitan Authorities Department.

He ran unsuccessfully for constable in 1958, beaten by incumbent Butch Leypoldt. In 1961 Leypoldt was designated to the Nevada Pc gaming Control Board, and the County Commission called Lamb as his replacement. Lamb won the election in 1962 and was sheriff for 18 years, longer than any other sheriff has held the task.

Lamb’s most active years in police accompanied quick growth in the pc gaming market, and much of that growth was managed by individuals associated, a minimum of formerly, with arranged criminal offense. To shut out the worst of that aspect, Lamb got the County Commission to pass the “work card law” that needed any individual working in gaming to be fingerprinted and photographed and to inform the sheriff if she or he transferred to another task.

Through the work card law he controlled who might or might not work in the city’s essential industry and lots of peripheral tasks. And unlike most authorities chiefs, he was answerable only to voters.

His profession as a Western lawman would go on to end up being the basis of the 2012-13 CBS series “Vegas.” Dennis Quaid played Lamb as a cowboy dragooned into the lawman’s function and coping organized criminal activity characters attempting to take over the town. Though very loosely based upon Lamb’s career and historically incorrect, the program garnered good reviews however still lasted just one period.

Lamb is survived by his spouse, the previous Fae Cornell, 2 children, Cliff and Clint, two grandchildren and his brother, previous Clark County Commissioner Darwin Lamb. He was preceded in death by his five siblings, Floyd Lamb, Sheldon Lamb, Phil Lamb and Larry Lamb, and 4 sis, Myrtle Howery, Erma McIntosh, Fae Mason and Wanda Peccole.

This is a developing story. Inspect back for updates.

Contact reporter Colton Lochhead at clochhead@reviewjournal.com!.?.! or 702-383-4638. Find him on Twitter: @ColtonLochhead.

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