City Authorities set policy for showing body-camera recordings to public

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L.E. Baskow

Video view from the body used video camera on City Law enforcement agent Nicole Hemsey as she draws her weapon on an armed suspect played by officer Chad Lyman throughout a media occasion at the Mohave Training Center on Wednesday, November 12, 2014.

Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015|2 a.m.

City Authorities have developed rules and set a cost structure for making officer body-camera video readily available to the media and public, in what officials say is an effort to balance require transparency with personal privacy rights and recover costs.

A policy revealed Thursday by City Police allows people who send composed requests to view taped video in a closed living room under cops supervision.

Clips or copies of footage can be offered later to individuals who pay an up-front charge for processing and redaction of non-public info, billed at $48 per hour.

Applications to view video will certainly be dealt with in three groups– the media, the public and included residents who dealt straight with the officer.

“This is brand-new territory,” said Officer Larry Hadfield, a department spokesman who has been associated with drawing up the new policy.

“We’re one of the first cops departments to tackle this,” Hadfield said. “We wish to be transparent, but we likewise have think about the personal privacy of the people we serve.”

Work on a policy started after almost 200 Las Vegas policeman started putting on video cameras in 2014 as part of a pilot program paid for by the federal National Institute of Justice. Their work is being examined as part of a research study looking at how the gadgets shape interactions between officers and the public.

The department, with about 2,400 sworn police officers, is among the largest agencies in the nation checking the use of body-worn cams.

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