Jon Huntsman Sr., Utah billionaire and philanthropist, passes away

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=” Image “/ > Rick Bowmer/ AP In this Oct. 3, 2014, file image, Jon Huntsman, Sr. talks to reporters during an interview, in Salt Lake City.

Released Friday, Feb. 2, 2018|2:44 p.m.

Updated 5 minutes ago

SALT LAKE CITY– Utah billionaire and philanthropist Jon Huntsman Sr., who got rid of hardship to end up being among the state’s most effective and effective individuals, passed away Friday at age 80.

Huntsman’s long time assistant Pam Bailey stated he passed away in Salt Lake City however she declined to call a cause of death. The Huntsman Corp., his business, said in a declaration that Huntsman at his home, surrounded by family.

Huntsman was the founder and long time executive chairman of the $11 billion business that refines raw materials that go into thousands of items. He was likewise the father of Jon Huntsman Jr., the U.S. ambassador to Russia and former Utah guv, governmental candidate and ambassador to China and Singapore.

The older Huntsman and his household have actually given away more than $1.4 billion, consisting of contributions to a Salt Lake City cancer institute that bears his name.

” Cancer is horrible and deplorable and must be conquered, and it will be, as any wicked eventually is defeated,” Huntsman composed in his 2014 autobiography. He stated he would ensure that the institute continues its mission “if it takes my last dollar– and I expect that will be the case.”

In 1970, Huntsman founded the Huntsman Container Corp., which concentrated on food packaging and originated the clamshell container used for McDonald’s Corp.’s Big Mac hamburger. He formed Huntsman Chemical Corp. in 1982 and more than a years later, combined his companies as Huntsman Corp., producing materials utilized in a large range of items, from textiles and paints to plastics and air travel components.

Huntsman stepped down from his role in December and his boy Peter Huntsman took over as the company’s leader. His daddy continued to serve on the company’s board of director and was named chairman emeritus.

After collecting his fortune, Huntsman gave $10 million the University of Utah in 1992 to establish the Huntsman Cancer Institute, a research center dedicated to finding a cure through human genetics.

Two years later on, he provided $100 million to the institute, at the time the biggest ever monetary contribution to medical research.

Huntsman, who lost both his moms and dads to cancer and combated his own battle with the disease, said he wanted the institute to assist make Utah the cancer research study capital of the world.

He also wielded his power as a billionaire benefactor to the center. After the cancer institute’s director and CEO was fired in April 2017, Huntsman mounted a public project slamming leaders of the university and got full-age paper ads calling the authorities “inept and disinterested.” The director and CEO was restored a week after her firing and the school’s healthcare leader and president stepped down.

The billionaire and his household likewise offered kindly to Utah’s homeless shelters along with more than $50 million to the Armenian people after a 1988 earthquake because country left thousands homeless.

He also played crucial roles in state and national politics.

Huntsman was a special assistant to President Richard Nixon in 1971-72 and quickly ran his own 1988 project for Utah’s governor.

Huntsman later served as a finance chairman for Mitt Romney’s 2008 presidential quote and in 2012, worked for his son’s governmental quote, providing more than $1.8 billion to an incredibly PAC supporting the more youthful Huntsman.

Following his son’s short-term race for the Republican nomination, Huntsman kept a toehold in Utah present affairs, occasionally offering political commentary to Utah newspapers and even expressing an interest in acquiring The Salt Lake Tribune.

His kid Paul Huntsman bought the paper in 2016 and named his father chairman emeritus.

In the 1980s, Huntsman explored buying the Tribune’s rival, the Mormon-church owned Deseret News. He met top-level leaders with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints however faith leaders did not wish to pursue the offer, Huntsman wrote in his autobiography.

A dedicated member of the Mormon church, Huntsman served in a number of top-level leadership positions with the faith and had close friendships with the past 5 church presidents.

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said in a declaration that his “legacy of loyal management, generosity and goodness” would be a beacon for many all over the world.

Huntsman said the family was exposed to the dark side of wealth and fame in 1987, when his then-16-year-old boy James Huntsman was kidnapped at knifepoint from his driveway. The teen was required to call his dad to organize payment of $1 million ransom. He was later on rescued by FBI agents.

Huntsman was born in 1937 in Blackfoot, Idaho and later moved to California, where he satisfied his partner Karen while in junior high there.

The couple later on relocated to Salt Lake City in the 1970s where they raised nine children, much of whom ended up being involved in the family service.

Huntsman is survived by his better half and 8 kids. One daughter, Kathleen Ann Huntsman, died in 2010 at age 44 after having a hard time for years with an eating condition.

Bailey had no instant details on funeral strategies Friday afternoon.

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