Tag Archives: activists

Activists postpone restore of Hawaii hotel with Elvis ties


Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island/ AP In this Sept. 13, 2007, file photo, workers move the Coco Palms Resort system sales sign far from the Kuamoo Road side of the former resort in Wailua on the island of Kauai in Hawaii.

Friday, Feb. 16, 2018|12:55 p.m.

HONOLULU– Developers restoring a storied, hurricane-ravaged Hawaii hotel with a Hollywood connection were anticipating the Coco Palms’ renewal when two guys appeared in 2015, claiming to own the home because they come down from King Kaumualii, the last ruler of Kauai.

The men set up camp in tents and at the old tennis pro store at the shuttered resort, where Elvis Presley’s character got married in the 1961 movie “Blue Hawaii.” Typhoon Iniki required its closure in 1992.

” They merely just appeared and began squatting,” said Chad Waters, among the partners of Coco Palms Hui, the business leading the redevelopment.

Authorities were called, trespassing citations were composed, and a judge last month provided an order to evict them.

Ever since, a stream of protesters has actually come and gone, with some days simply a couple of demonstrators and others lots encamped at the resort near an ancient Hawaiian fishpond in the neighborhood of Wailua.

It’s the latest example of Native Hawaiian activists deciding on cultural problems and sacred places, such as challenging a huge telescope planned for a Hawaiian mountain and obstructing the U.S. military from utilizing an unoccupied Hawaiian island as a live-fire testing site.

The demonstration likewise comes in the middle of continued advocacy by native groups throughout the U.S., who have rallied over issues ranging from sports mascots to environmental causes such as the Dakota Access and Keystone XL oil pipelines.

Efforts by The Associated Press to reach the two males in the Coco Palms case– Noa Mau-Espirito and Charles Hepa– by phone and online for comment were unsuccessful. However, Mau-Espirito in 2015 informed The Garden Island paper: “We have title to the land. We’re not camping. Our goal is to obtain all the households who have royal patents in Wailua back on their land.”

The judge disagreed with the males, ruling their claims don’t give them the right to occupy the residential or commercial property.

For Kaukaohu Wahilani, who flew from his house on Oahu to Kauai to support Mau-Espirito and others, it’s about standing up to the wrongs committed against Hawaiians– all the way back to the topple of the Hawaiian kingdom 125 years earlier.

” That was the place of kings, that was the location of alli,” he said, using the Hawaiian word for ruler or royalty. “It was a sacred place, and it still is.”

He and other Native Hawaiians want the location called by its traditional name, Wailuanuiahoano.

A minimum of 50 protesters collected at the website, bracing for law enforcement action, as the judge’s 6 p.m., Jan. 28, deadline to leave the property approached. However no police appeared, and the protesters stayed.

” I was type of hoping (police) would have showed up at 6 because we had a great deal of people there,” said Wahilani, a Native Hawaiian activist who considers himself a subject of the Hawaiian kingdom.

Last month, the accuseds filed a file stamped the “Hawaiian Judiciary Court of the Sovereign,” stating the judge in the Coco Palms case has to give up to law enforcement or face “immediate arrest.” In court documents, Judge Michael Soong called the filing nonsensical “legalistic mumbo jumbo.”

Five to 10 individuals have been at the home this week, Waters stated.

He and his partner requested help from state sheriffs.

Toni Schwartz, spokeswoman for the state Department of Public Security, stated only that the constables are pursuing a resolution with the property owner, Kauai cops and the protesters. “For safety and security reasons, we are not at this time, free to talk about any methods that might be utilized in any associated enforcement action,” Schwartz stated in a declaration.

Demolition started in 2016, with the objective of resuming in mid-2018. The clash has caused hold-ups, so the designers want to start building and construction soon after the protesters leave, Waters said.

The refurbished hotel will have 350 rooms, consisting of 22 master suites and about 50 junior suites. Hyatt will handle the hotel once it’s reopened.

Wailua was the political center of Kauai long prior to the resort opened in 1953 and Presley’s character crooned the “Hawaiian Wedding Song” while holding his bride’s hand and boarding a raft to cross a lagoon.

It’s where chiefs were born and lived, said Lilia Merrin, a teaching assistant at the University of Hawaii’s Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Research Studies. Because of its high amount of surface area water, it was ideal for loi, irrigated fields for farming the starchy veggie taro, a staple crop, she said.

Maturing in Wailua, Merrin understood of Coco Palms primarily as the hotel where household friends operated in service tasks prior to the cyclone. She learnt more about its Hawaiian significance in college. “If we comprehend these locations, we can better safeguard them,” she said.

Coco Palms Hui has actually planned because 2014 to set aside land at the resort for a community not-for-profit that will use lessons in Hawaiian culture, consisting of hula, lei making, Hawaiian language and ukulele.

The nonprofit likewise will supply hotel employees with a guide about Hawaiian culture and the historic Wailua area. The fishponds and lagoons are on the state historical registry and will be preserved.

Tyler Greene, the other partner of Coco Palms Hui, has said the resort will assist the island by supporting “healthy and lively activity for both the locals and visitors,” inning accordance with The Garden Island.

The Coco Palms fight was inspired by what protesters achieved against the Thirty Meter Telescope, which they stated would desecrate sacred Mauna Kea, Wahilani said.

Construction stopped in 2015 after 31 demonstrators were arrested on the mountain for blocking the work. A 2nd effort to reboot building and construction ended with more arrests and crews pulling back.

The project is now bound in legal fights.

” Mauna Kea brought us together, and ever since we’ve done fantastic things,” Wahilani said.

Ratings of farm employees, activists march on Ben & & Jerry ' s.

Saturday, June 17, 2017|12:36 p.m.

MONTPELIER, Vt.– Ratings of dairy farm workers and activists marched Saturday on a Ben & & Jerry’s factory to promote better pay and living conditions on farms that provide milk for the ice cream maker that takes pride in its social advocacy.

Protesters said Ben & & Jerry’s concurred two years ago to take part in the so-called Milk with Dignity program, however the company and worker agents have yet to reach an agreement.

“We can’t wait anymore. We are going to pressure them and see what takes place,” said Victor Diaz, a Mexican immigrant now dealing with a farm in Vergennes.

Ben & & Jerry’s representative Sean Greenwood stated prior to Saturday’s march from the Statehouse to the Waterbury factory that the business aspired to reach a contract and negotiations were underway.

“We are a values-led service. We frame ourselves as an aspiring social justice business,” said Greenwood. “We try to do excellent with whatever we can with our company. Dairy has actually definitely been one of those issues we have actually done a ton of deal with for years.”

Ben & & Jerry’s promotes its social activism as much as its eccentric ice-cream tastes such as Cherry Garcia, Chunky Monkey and Phish Food. A lot of its raw materials, like sugar, cocoa, vanilla, bananas and coffee come from producers across the world that register for the Fairtrade program, which promotes greater rates and better working conditions for farmers.

About 85 percent of the milk Ben & & Jerry’s uses in its ice cream made in North America originates from about 80 Vermont dairy farms. Its Caring Dairy program promotes sustainable farming by providing farmers money incentives for keeping up with finest management practices.

The Milk with Dignity program was established in 2014 by farm employees and the Vermont group Migrant Justice to guarantee that farms supply them reasonable salaries and working conditions and decent housing. In 2015, Ben & & Jerry’s agreed to sign up with the program. Since then, the 2 sides have actually been working out over the details.

“We have actually been working out in great faith,” stated Will Lambek of Migrant Justice. “It’s an undesirable delay.”

Greenwood stated Ben & & Jerry’s didn’t get the first details from the employees up until a year back and the 2 sides have actually been working since then to reach an agreement.

“It needs to work for the farmers, the farm owners, and it needs to work for business included and that’s the complex piece,” Greenwood stated. “How do you make certain that it will be operationalized so it’s a win-win across the board which’s what we’ve been dealing with for well over a year now.”