Tag Archives: artists

Quick Take: Preventing the Injuries that Plague Carrying Out Artists

UNLV music teacher and expert oboist Stephen Caplan understands first-hand the injuries that repeated motion can trigger. He keeps in mind clearly the case of a skilled high school trainee who returned from a summertime program unable to play as the result of such an injury.

Caplan had no concept the best ways to help that trainee, however he was identified for more information. As he started studying the causes and dynamics of performing arts injuries, he began working with other teachers in his college to establish the College of Fine Arts Consortium for Health and Injury Avoidance. The consortium assists practitioners of all the performing arts avoid and mitigate injuries.

What kinds of injuries do entertainers incur?

The majority of artists’ injuries are triggered by over-use and include tendinitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, and TMJ dysfunction. Dancers tend to have more acute injuries than artists, and injuries to the leg joints are the most common. Stars, obviously, frequently sing and dance, which can result in injuries.

What can performing artists learn from your work to avoid injuries?

Among the best ways for performing artists to prevent injury is to increase self-awareness, especially associated to posture when sitting, standing, and moving. Improved postural awareness will help anyone who utilizes repeated motions on a regular basis– grocery clerks, hairdressers, anyone who utilizes a computer a lot, and so on

. How did you begin studying injuries in performing artists?

I was irritated when among my finest high school students came back from a distinguished summer season program, but couldn’t play the oboe any longer because he had actually developed tendinitis. I had never skilled injury from playing an instrument, so I had no idea how to assist him. Now I have actually written a book about it. Among the greatest things has been getting e-mails from individuals all over the world, thanking me for composing that book since they state it’s conserved their profession!

What’s the most significant difficulty in getting artists to take actions to prevent injuries?

Altering an entertainer’s way of considering self-care (both physical and psychological self-care). Many performers rely on medical professionals, therapists, motion specialists, etc., when they are hurt. Self-care ought to not just have to do with repairing something. It needs to be acknowledged as something entertainers ought to do all the time in order to maximize success.

What self-care or therapies do you recommend?

I have actually personally been assisted by lots of fantastic somatic disciplines that increase physical awareness and muscular flexibility, specifically Alexander Method, Feldenkrais Method, and Body Mapping. I also feel carrying out artists can gain from yoga and tai chi. There are numerous modalities that work, it’s just important to discover exactly what you connect with– and do it!

More About the Performing Arts Wellness Seminar

The College of Fine Arts Consortium for Health and Injury Prevention will host its first Performing Arts Wellness Seminar on April 6 and 7 in the Alta Ham Fine Arts Building.The seminar begins at 7:30 p.m. April 6 with a proving of the new documentary that entertainers all over the world are discussing, Made up: Attending To Performance Anxiety. Through the lens of professional classical musicians, Composed explores the many methods we experience and can address efficiency stress and anxiety. This top-notch documentary features interviews with a lot of today’s leading performers along with psychologists, efficiency coaches, and others.

The following day is a dynamic and interactive look at the health concerns facing today’s performing artist. There will be a panel discussion, lectures, workshops, a performance, and a meet-and-greet reception.

Nation artists deliver homage to performance attack victims

Image

Assocaited Press The Brothers Osborne, from left, Maren Morris and Eric Church carry out at the 60th annual Grammy Awards at Madison Square Garden on Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018, in New York.

Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018|7:16 p.m.

Associated content

Three artists who performed at a c and w festival that became the site of the deadliest mass shooting in contemporary U.S. history honored those music fans lost at lethal performance attacks with a tearful efficiency at the Grammy Awards.

Country artists Eric Church, Maren Morris and Brothers Osborne delivered a moving performance of Eric Clapton’s Grammy-winning traditional “Tears in Heaven,” throughout the 60th annual Grammys Awards in New York City on Sunday, the names of victims behind them.

” All c and w was reminded in the most terrible way then connection we share with fans and the caring power that music will always supply,” said Eric Church who appeared to struggle to speak.

The artists put their own spin on the mournful tune in honor of the victims at the Path 91 Harvest Celebration last October in Las Vegas, along with a bombing outside an Ariana Grande performance in Manchester, England, in May.

” Tears in Paradise,” which won 3 Grammys in 1993 consisting of record and song of the year, was written after Clapton’s four-year-old son died in 1991 after falling out of a high-rise window.

The touching homage was dealt with tenderly in between vocalist TJ Osborne’s emotional baritone, Morris’ Texas twang and Church’s powerful singing, although a bad microphone made much of Morris’ intro before the song muddled.

” The painful fact is that this year in simply those two occasions 81 music enthusiasts, just like us, went out to delight in a night of music and never ever came back house,” Morris stated.

UNLV artists welcomed back to Monterey jazz fest competitors

Image

Josh Hawkins/ UNLV Creative Services

The UNLV Jazz Ensemble 1 big band tied for first place in 2017 at the Monterey Next Generation Jazz Festival. It will compete once again this year in the festival’s College Big Band Division.

Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018|2 a.m.

. Last year, UNLV’s Jazz Research studies program won bragging rights for life when its Jazz Ensemble 1 big band connected for first place in the extremely regarded Monterey Next Generation Jazz Celebration. Naturally. This year, it’ll get another possibility to come out on top.

The mighty Jazz Ensemble 1 will compete once again in the festival’s College Big Band Department, which features 6 university bands.

Likewise signing up with the student-musician fest this year: UNLV’s Honors Trio, which will contend– likewise against five other bands– in the College Combo Division.

Both will be signed up with by Jazz Studies director and professor Dave Loeb, and Jazz Research studies professors Nathan Tanouye and Adam Schroeder.

Prior success in the festival does not guarantee positioning in the future, Loeb said. “Each year is various since the group or ensemble made the invite through a blind audition process. The ensemble or combination send a recording that is on an unmarked MP3, so they are judged totally on the recording that needs to fit into extremely stiff criteria,” he stated.

To sweeten the Las Vegas showing at the celebration, which happens March 9-11 in Monterey, Calif., the Las Vegas Academy of the Arts Jazz Band has been chosen to compete versus 12 other bands in the High School Big Band Division. LVA’s band will be led by Patrick Bowen.

Jazz Ensemble 1’s victory last April earned the band an efficiency slot at the primary Monterey Jazz Celebration in September, where it joined a lineup topped by jazz stars Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea and Dee Bridgewater.

Country stars honor Las Vegas shooting victims at CMT Artists show

Image

Wade Payne/ Invision/ AP Country entertainers Chris Stapleton, from left, Brian Kelly, Tyler Hubbard, Jason Aldean, Keith Urban and Luke Bryan are seen at CMT Artists of the Year program at Nashville’s Schermerhorn Symphony Center on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn.

Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017|8 p.m.

NASHVILLE, Tenn.– Vocalist Jason Aldean and other stars honored victims of a mass shooting at a c and w celebration in Las Vegas instead of accepting awards at the CMT Artists of the Year show Wednesday night.

The format of the program pivoted to focus on victims of the shooting, in addition to those recovering from typhoons and wildfires, with a night of somber homages, inspiring anthems and voices raised in harmony.

Aldean, who was onstage at the Route 91 Harvest Celebration when the shooting took place Oct. 1, stood side-by-side with the night’s other award winners– including Luke Bryan, Florida Georgia Line, Chris Stapleton and Keith Urban– to dedicate the night to music fans. The honorees did not accept awards or provide speeches as normal, but some opted to perform or other musicians performed in their honor.

“We have actually been tested beyond our worst nightmare these previous couple of months,” Aldean stated during the live broadcast from Nashville, Tennessee. “Heartbroken does not even begin to explain how some of us feel. However we have shown time and again in this nation that we have the power to conquer anything that threatens our way of living, or our freedom. We devote this night to you and everybody who has experienced loss or catastrophe in the last few months.”

Aldean closed out the night with a bold and rollicking group performance of “I Will not Back Down” by Tom Petty with Urban, Stapleton and Little Big Town.

Andra Day began the awards show with her anthem “Rise Up,” in a stunning harmony duet by Little Big Town. Then Lee Ann Womack, Danielle Bradbury and rap artist Common joined them for a performance of “Stand Up For Something.”

“On this night when we typically commemorate a year of music, we also want to commemorate a year of incredible human spirit, the spirit we see in our fans every night,” Stapleton said.

“So in some little way we wish to thank you for your resolve and perhaps lift your spirits for simply a moment,” Urban said.

The names of the 58 victims from Las Vegas were listed throughout an in memoriam sector, along with the names of Petty, Gregg Allman, Glen Campbell, Don Williams and Troy Gentry.

Other efficiencies including Bryan singing his single “Quick,” and Stapleton singing his tune “Broken Halos,” a tune that he’s committed to victims of the Vegas shooting.

The Backstreet Boys sang Florida Georgia Line’s emotional ballad “H.O.L.Y.” and Keith Urban carried out a jazzy variation of his tune “Blue Ain’t Your Color.”

Phillip Phillips added some blues licks to Sam Hunt’s mega hit “Body Like a Back Roadway,” which was named song of the year by CMT.

Near the end of the night, Bryan took a moment to honor his buddy Aldean.

“It could have been any among us basing on that stage two weeks ago,” Bryan said. “It’s a headache that nobody ought to need to deal with. Jason has responded with self-respect, care, regard and, some methods, defiance. And we all are proud of him, particularly me.”

Emerge adds more regional artists to the lineup

In this weekly series, we highlight the entertainers and other individuals who will combine for the Emerge Music + Effect Conference on the Las Vegas Strip November 16-18. Tickets are available now at emergelv.com.

Last week, the Emerge Effect + Music Conference– set to make its very first impact in November in Las Vegas– revealed the addition of more than 50 acts to its currently excellent lineup of up-and-coming artists. The conference’s curation committee didn’t have to look far to spot a few of its fresh talent; a handful of the freshly added acts come from here in Las Vegas.

Brittany Rose is a soulful R&B singer whose profile is increasing quickly thanks to just recently launched EP Homegirl. With her personal lyrics and hip-hop edge, think of B. Rose as Vegas’ own Mary J. Blige. “I attempt to stay as honest and raw and emotional as I can be as an entertainer,” she told Las Vegas Weekly in July.

Psychological lyrics provided strongly over elaborate production are the aspects that specify 28-year-old Ekoh, an MC who has actually performed with Kottonmouth Kings, Dilated Peoples, Immortal Method, Tech N9ne and many more.

Sabriel, a neo-soul singer and songwriter inspired by Prince, Stevie Wonder, D’Angelo and Erykah Badu has also joined the Emerge bill, as has Dark Black, a contagious, guitar-driven post-punk quartet featuring three-fifths the lineup of previous Las Vegas hardcore favorite Caravels.

Rose, Ekoh, Sabriel and Dark Black join formerly revealed local acts The Lique and Mercy Music, including much more distinct Vegas taste to the first-year fest’s amazing offerings.

The square gallery: Meet 3 Vegas artists using Instagram as an online Arts District

Montana Black didn’t understand Instagram in the beginning.” [Innovative organisation coach] RaShelle Roberts recommended it to me,” she says. “She suggested that I begin posting my work there, stating what an excellent platform it is for artists to post their work. And she stated that collectors and curators are in fact searching for brand-new artists on Instagram.”

@montanatblack

@montanatblack So Black began posting her art to her Instagram feed. Black isn’t precisely a brand-new Vegas artist

; she has actually done lots of regional gallery reveals considering that 1990. However she approached her Instagram feed (@montanatblack) with the earnest enthusiasm of a new artist, publishing a stable flood of her spirited, remarkably rendered pencil-and-gouache research studies of animals, origami cranes and assorted Americana.

Soon, a new fan commissioned her to do an animal picture, so that part of the experiment paid off. However more considerably, Black began to delight in browsing Instagram herself, utilizing it to find “artists to be motivated by,” she states. “And I have actually found numerous.”

@seancjonesart

@seancjonesart She’s not alone. Among the YOLO selfies, food photos and holiday shots, artists are starting to discover an Instagram grip. It’s not an ideal platform for displaying art– essential information are lost at phone size, and the service flatly rejects vertical works– but it is an easy gallery to search, one that never closes. And it has inspired artists like Sean C. Jones, an illustrator who teaches intermediate school by day, to develop a lot more work to satisfy demand. In fact, Jones is publishing a brand-new drawing to his Instagram feed (@seancjonesart) every day.

“In the beginning, I was figured out to do a drawing a day just for a year … and once I struck the year mark, I ‘d take a couple days off,” he jokes. Jones’ work varies from hyper-detailed pencil drawings to broad-lined, vibrant 1950s comic book design illustrations, and he covers a wonderfully eccentric range of topics– whatever from horror motion pictures to regional landmarks to Disneyland.

The amusing thing is, in such a way, he’s doing it for the kids. “I started this because, for Twenty Years I’ve had my trainees make a daily drawing in class,” he states. “Monday through Friday, when they can be found in, I have the daily illustration composed on the board– something like “Pizza Queen” or “The Wonderful World of Mr. Banana.” And while I’m taking roll and reading emails, they’re dealing with their everyday drawing. … It’s the physical act of it. I don’t know why we consider drawing to be such a huge mental procedure. It’s more like a dancer stretching out prior to they do a show.”

@jskapriebe

@jskapriebe Drawing every day– and posting those drawings to Instagram– keeps Jones’ creative mind limber, while he awaits his turn on Vegas’ increasingly congested gallery walls. (“I just gave up when Blackbird closed. And attempting to get into the other galleries … there’s either a long wait, or they wish to charge you for the walls.”) But for Jska Priebe (@jskapriebe), Instagram is something else: a container that captures the overspill of her enthusiasm. Whenever something gets Jska fired up– whether it’s text treatments or Twin Peaks: The Return– she makes it into art and posts it.

“I’m truly influenced by realism, however it takes a very long time,” she says. “When I’m inspired I knock out an illustration, due to the fact that it doesn’t take months to paint.”

Priebe’s fast works look anything however. Her Twin Peaks series blends the show’s bizarre dialogue (“My log has a message for you”) into portraits of the characters who spoke it. Figuratively speaking, they’re using their hearts on their sleeves. And it’s something we may not have actually seen while the program was still airing, had Priebe waited to put these on a gallery wall. In truth, she used to run a gallery– the now-defunct Spectral, at Downtown Areas– but she’s delighting in the liberty that Instagram manages.

“Easily, individuals are into taking a look at art on their phones,” she states, chuckling.

VMA artists, speakers require equality, suicide prevention

Monday, Aug. 28, 2017|6:37 a.m.

. The MTV Video Music Awards are known for developing viral moments implied to shock or impress. But this year’s show was a far more full-grown affair that had lots of essential speeches, exciting efficiencies and pop culture occasions.

Numerous award presenters called for equality, including the mother of a woman who was eliminated while protesting white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, and a descendant of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Other artists reached out to those suffering from depression. Pink taught her daughter an important lesson of self-acceptance.

Lastly, Kendrick Lamar, the night’s huge winner, set the phase ablaze at the beginning of the program, while Taylor Swift bid farewell to her credibility in a new music video.

Here are the program’s leading moments:

__

PINK ‘S LESSON OF LOVE

Pink was honored on Sunday night with the Michael Jackson Video Lead Award. After carrying out a medley of her hits atop an automobile suspended from cable televisions and riding around on a lawnmower, Pink utilized her acceptance speech to resolve her 6-year-old child, Willow, who got here on the red carpet in a three-piece suit to match her moms and dads’ fits.

The Grammy-winning singer said her child informed her just recently she seemed like she was unsightly. Pink reacted that numerous artists, from Jackson to Prince to David Bowie as well as herself, were routinely made fun of, but pressed ahead with their art to motivate others.

“We don’t change,” Pink stated. “We take the gravel in the shell and make a pearl. And we help other individuals to alter so they can see more sort of charm.”

And in closing, she advised her daughter: “You my darling are gorgeous.”

__

NOT ALONE

The musical neighborhood was hit hard this year with the suicides of two rock artists, Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington and Soundgarden’s Chris Cornell. Jared Leto, actor and diva of the band 30 Seconds to Mars, spoke about visiting with both singers and how Bennington’s voice was “at the same time ferocious and fragile. That voice will live permanently.” Leto utilized the homage to reach out to those suffering with thoughts of suicide.

“Hear me now: You are not alone,” Leto stated. “There is always a method forward. Reach out. Share your thoughts. Do not quit.”

That belief was amplified throughout an efficiency by Reasoning, Alessia Cara and Khalid, who carried out a tune for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, “1-800-273-8255.” The performers were joined on phase by suicide effort survivors, a few of whom were crying. Reasoning said the tune was “a platform to talk about something that mainstream media does not want to speak about: mental health, stress and anxiety and depression.”

__

A REQUIRE EQUALITY

Throughout the night, the relentless style for lots of artists and speakers on the stage was to require unity and equality. Paris Jackson, daughter of Michael Jackson, stated that America has no tolerance for violence, hatred and bigotry.

Susan Brother, whose daughter Heather Heyer was eliminated when a man owned his vehicle into a crowd in Charlottesville, stated individuals all over the world had actually been influenced by her child’s guts.

“I desire individuals to know that Heather never ever marched alone,” Brother said. “She was signed up with by individuals from every race and every background in this country.”

The violence in Charlottesville was triggered by the city’s choice to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. One of his descendants, the Rev. Robert Wright Lee IV, introduced Bro and said his ancestor has actually become a sign of bigotry.

“We have actually made my forefather an idol of white supremacy, bigotry and hate,” Lee said. “As a pastor, it is my ethical duty to speak out against bigotry, America’s initial sin.”

__

RIP OLD TAYLOR

Taylor Swift stated completion of her track record in her brand-new video for her first single “Look What You Made Me Do,” from her next album. In the video, which premiered throughout the VMAs first hour, the pop star emerged from the tomb as a zombie and sang her accusations in a dark world where previous versions of herself come back to haunt her.

With a variety of recommendations to her feuding with other stars like Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West, the video parodies the media stories around her profession. It concludes with a number of Swifts arguing among themselves, with digs that have actually frequently been tossed at her such as “You are so fake,” or “There she goes playing the victim again.” Lastly it ends with her own famous quote describing Kanye West: “I would quite like to be omitted from this narrative.”

__

FIRE AWAY KENDRICK

With the top-selling album of the year, Kendrick Lamar was the big winner with six awards, including video of the year. He opened the show rapping his single “DNA,” in a cage of laser lights. Then as he transitioned to his hit “Modest,” a performer is fired simply a few feet away from Lamar in a dangerous and rather scary minute. The rest of the efficiency featured ninja-like dancers scaling a wall of fire behind Lamar.

Art gone Vegas: The Neon Museum strikes the Strip and Cirque’s artists display at Neonopolis

Image

The Red Barn indication– from one of Las Vegas’ very first gay bars– will be the first Neon Museum piece to go to the Fashion Show mall.

Wednesday, Might 17, 2017|2 a.m.

Intriguing Vegas art happenings are on the way.

At some point in June, the Neon Museum and the Style Show mall will partner to develop the very first satellite space on the Strip for the museum’s historic neon art. The Style Show’s Strip-side plaza will be the house of the Red Barn sign, a charming martini marquee from the antique shop that opened on Tropicana Avenue in the late 1950s and converted into a bar in the early 1960s. Prior to 1970 occurred, the Red Barn had turned into one of Las Vegas’ first gay bars, house of the RB Follies program and head office for the publishing of the RB Rag, one of the earliest gay publications in Southern Nevada. It closed in 1988.

After numerous months, the Red Barn sign will rejoin the Neon Museum’s collection and a various setup will take its place.

“For decades, the Las Vegas Strip earned prestige for taking down and removing historic buildings and the neon signs associated with them,” said Rob McCoy, president and president of the Neon Museum, in the announcement. “With this effort, Fashion Program takes an action toward reversing that pattern by reintroducing renowned and historic neon signs to the Strip, where it can be delighted in by 10s of millions of visitors.”

Odds are those visitors will likewise be inclined to visit the downtown museum, too.

“This display screen is just the start,” stated Jim Heilmann, senior general supervisor at Fashion Program. “Our concierge team will work with the museum to supply special incentives for our shoppers to go to the world-famous Neon Museum Boneyard. Throughout the year, we will host events and offer fundraising chances to enhance our shared mission of spreading out appeal and culture.”

So there you have it: Downtown art sliding to the Strip. And after that there’s the reverse result, when Strip art moves downtown: On June 1, Cirque du Soleil’s 12th annual art exhibit, The Collective, will start its month-long screen at the Metropolitan Gallery of Las Vegas Art Museum, located inside Neonopolis on Fremont Street.

The Collective is a collection of artwork produced by Cirque’s performers, specialists and staff– another creative outlet for the ultra-creative– and for the first time in the program’s history, each taking part staff member was able to send approximately 3 works instead of one.

“Homeowners will have the chance to get to know their next-door neighbors as we reveal another side of our workers through their artwork,” said Lou D’Angeli, vice president of marketing for Cirque du Soleil. “In hosting The Cumulative each year, we are able to shine the spotlight on their unique skills, creating an even higher connection between us and the neighborhood.”

The exhibition will likewise show Cirque-owned art pieces and props and outfits from various Strip productions. There will be a $5 entryway charge at the gallery.