Tag Archives: board

Regent who wants Jessup gone says raising money is not board'' s issue

contact)Saturday, March 17, 2018|2 a.m. Trevor Hayes Related news One of 2 regents pushing most vigorously for UNLV President Len Jessup’s ouster brushed off the notion that the board should be worried about fundraising at the university in spite of a mounting revolt by some of the school’s largest backers.

If regents’ actions require Jessup to leave, numerous mega-donors have stated they would rescind pledges that total up to about $39 million in donations to the UNLV School of Medicine and another $8 million for a basic scholarship endowment fund. These moves cast doubt on another $25 million in state-matching funds for the medical school. The pledges would go toward new building and construction, academic programs and scholarships.

Trevor Hayes, a regent who has been aggressive in pursuing Jessup’s elimination and exciting the ire of donors, stated fundraising isn’t part of the board’s duties.

“The board governs greater ed; we’re not fundraising events. It isn’t our responsibility,” said Hayes, who chairs the regents’ Service, Finance and Facilities Committee and is likewise on the board of directors of the UNLV Campus Enhancement Authority.

Meanwhile, Regent Sam Lieberman expressed certainty the cash would eventually return to the university.

Lieberman stated he was positive that Scott Roberts, UNLV’s president for philanthropy and alumni engagement, might “weather the storm and move forward.” Roberts might not be right away reached for comment.

“(Roberts) is extraordinary,” Lieberman stated. “And he will have the assistance he needs to get the donors.”

One of those donors sharply disagreed with Hayes and Lieberman.

The anonymous donor of a multimillion-dollar gift said Friday that the regents, as stewards of the state’s university system, need to be vitally concerned about the fallout that Jessup’s ouster might have on UNLV’s fundraising.

“Len created an immense quantity of support amongst the donor neighborhood,” the benefactor said. “I cannot speak for others, but for myself, we ‘d be at no contributions without Len there.”

The donor, who had actually contributed $8 million to a scholarship endowment fund, alerted the UNLV Foundation fundraising organization Friday early morning that he would rescind the present if Jessup were to resign or be fired.

Describing a faction of regents who have been publicly critical of Jessup and have mounted an effort to force him out, the donor stated UNLV advocates would remember them in their next election cycle. He suggested that moneying some donors may have guided towards UNLV might go rather to the regents’ election opponents.

“I believe these regents have to go,” he said. “I’m really concerned about people putting petty private concerns above the well-being of the university and of Southern Nevada, and I believe that’s exactly what’s going on here.”

On Wednesday, officials from the Engelstad Household Structure, which pledged $14 million for the building and construction of a medical school building, stated the gift was being withdrawn amidst unpredictability about Jessup’s future. That triggered a 2nd donor, who had provided $25 million and was considering using a second major donation, to also reevaluate.

An anonymous megadonor who provided a $25 million present towards building of the UNLV medical school building in 2016 responded madly to Hayes saying that a university’s fundraising wasn’t a regent’s responsibility. Given that regents are accountable for the overall well-being of Nevada’s institutions of higher education, she stated, Hayes and other regents ought to think about the implications of their actions on fundraising.

“Exactly what do you believe your duties entail?” she stated, intending her question at Hayes. “If fundraising isn’t your responsibility, is it your obligation to meddle and weaken what we’re doing?”

The donor, whose contribution for the medical school was matched by $25 million in state financing, has announced that she was reconsidering that present and future donations. If Jessup is forced out, she stated, she believed it would take a decade to restore trust amongst donors in the university.

“People do not just show back up on your doorstep,” she said. “They have to believe in what they’re purchasing.

“I believe these regents are delusional. They believe things are just going to plod along, which’s not what will happen.”

Beyond the considerable monetary damage to UNLV, if Jessup were to be dislodged or fired, some UNLV supporters and even regents believe the way this has unfolded might make it challenging for the university to discover an appropriate replacement.

Lieberman stated a certified candidate would have to think twice prior to signing on to lead the university. Jessup, in the third year of a five-year agreement, would be the fourth UNLV president since 2006 to be ushered out prior to completing his term.

Jessup’s accomplishments include supervising the registration of UNLV’s very first class of medical school students, helping cut an offer for the football team to share a stadium with the NFL’s Raiders, setting school fundraising records and discussing the 30,000 mark in student enrollment.

But Jessup has actually faced criticism from some regents and Chancellor Thom Reilly over financial and management conflicts, consisting of cost overruns from the 2016 presidential dispute at the Thomas & & Mack Center and low fundraising for the medical school building.

While a formal examination from Reilly happened in January, talked to regents said they hoped Jessup would stay in the position while a complete evaluation– carried out by a selected committee that interviews members of the community as well as school personnel– was finished and presented to the general public. That would come in between June and September.

“I’m a big fan of transparency,” Regent J.T. Moran said. “I would wish to go through a review procedure and give the board a chance to review all pertinent details so we can make a meaningful and educated decision.”

On the other hand, a declaration by Gov. Brian Sandoval made it sound as if decisions had actually already been made without any public meetings.

Sandoval, through spokeswoman Mari St. Martin, stated Thursday he had “great regard” for Jessup and wanted him well in “future endeavors.” St. Martin did not react when pressed about the possible future of the medical school, which Sandoval and the Nevada Legislature helped manage more $50 million in state funds to develop and open.

Ric Anderson added to this report.

Challengers line city board aisles to condemn call for addition

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< img class =" picture" src=" /wp-content/uploads/2018/02/IMG_0468_t653.JPG" alt

=” Image”/ > Yvonne Gonzalez Locals line up on Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, at a Las Vegas City board special meeting to oppose city addition of 10 Clark County islands. The relocation would cost the county $3 million.

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Clark County might lose $3 million in profits if Las Vegas progresses with an annexation plan that dozens of homeowners opposed at a public hearing on Monday.

The city wishes to annex 10 “islands” of unincorporated Clark County that are surrounded by Las Vegas. To obstruct the plan, homeowners of these locations who represent ownership of 51 percent of the acreage and valuation of the homes had to register their opposition in person Monday, or in writing in the two weeks later.

It’s uncertain when or how the city will reveal the opposition tally. If opposed citizens are unsuccessful in obstructing the plan, the concern might come before the council as a regulation.

City board members and residents went over the balance of shared resources between Las Vegas and Clark County. Citizens pointed out that there are lots of locations of overlap, such as city and county parks which there are likewise city islands surrounded by county residential or commercial property.

In nearly 4 hours of public comment, with speakers typically restricted to a few minutes each, citizens stated real estate tax were a major concern. Homeowner annexed into the city could pay about $150 more in taxes per $100,000 evaluated appraisal.

Councilman Bob Coffin said few people at the meeting would see real estate tax increases as high as $50 or more annually.

” There are some very rich people who would pay a lot more,” Coffin said. “They’re not here today, they’re letting you do the work for them.”

The county can not obstruct the addition, but members of the commission have spoken out versus the plan. County Supervisor Yolanda King has said the focus is on the effect on locals however that the annexation would imply millions lost in county income. Commissioner Lawrence Weekly spoke versus the plan Monday as well as at a previous council meeting.

” This is a quality of life that people have actually purchased into,” Weekly stated Monday.

There was confusion on both sides about what annexation would change for residents in the 10 islands, such as shouldering the cost of walkways and street lights. Mayor Pro Tem Lois Tarkanian said these enhancements would only be made if homeowners desired them, but some challengers shared individual anecdotes of unwanted infrastructure tasks that cost property owners.

University Medical Center is supported by county basic fund earnings, according to the county. Citizens pay county taxes regardless of whether they live on city land.

” Does that mean the homeowners of the city cannot go to the county health center?” stated resident Dave Harrison, a centers engineer at Summerlin Hospital who has actually offered to spread awareness about the annexation proposal. “You keep saying, the county and the city, the county and the city, nevertheless, that medical facility serves both the city and the county.”

Tarkanian informed him that she believes the city pays some loan toward it also, however Clark County is unaware of any city of Las Vegas funding that supports the medical facility.

Numerous homeowners asked that the council take more time and explore the balance of resources and services with the county. That message was echoed by Weekly and County Commissioner Larry Brown, who has actually likewise acted as a Las Vegas city councilman. Brown stated there are some scenarios where the case for addition could be made, however that he does not support annexing the 10 islands all at once.

Brown said it holds true that most of the residents who would be annexed are in the 1.7 percent who pay the most affordable real estate tax in Southern Nevada. But, he said, he does not know who would win if the brightest minds from the county and city were to take a seat and have a fair-share dispute.

” This is more of a city-county issue,” he said. “The concern shouldn’t be placed on these individuals, due to the fact that it’s an unnecessary concern. What they’ve had to do for close to 6 weeks is unjust.”

Tarkanian likewise mentioned the tax imbalance.

” Do you believe it’s reasonable that you don’t pay the amount of tax that 98 percent of the remainder of the county and the city do?” Tarkanian asked one speaker. “That that has gone on for about 40 years, that you have been supported?”

There were boos from the audience at that, and Casket asked attendees not to be disrespectful.

” We’re in a constant fight with the county not for new money, however to obtain exactly what is owed us paid by you to them, but not to us, for a great deal of your services,” Coffin stated. “That’s something you may not understand however we live with. So just so you know this washes out in the end.”

As part of an arrangement over election expenses, the city in 2016 forgave $4 million in retroactive county debt connected to a 1987 change to a shared services agreement. Some citizens said Monday that the city and county have to solve the money concerns on their end instead of forcing a brand-new city code and real estate tax rate on locals.

The county does not need that people license their specific family pets and pay a charge, however the city does. After problems over the city’s animal registration charge, Councilwoman Michele Fiore said she has 2 unlicensed pet dogs in the city.

” Just because there’s rules on the books doesn’t imply they’re enforced,” Fiore stated.

Tarkanian, however, defended the city’s code enforcement after Las Vegas resident Richard Manhattan shared his issues about the city’s lack of maintenance. He stated he wants the city to pay as much focus on city neighborhoods as it does to locations up for annexation.

” The walkways in my neighborhood, there’s yard growing everywhere,” he said. “Nobody’s coming out and spraying them with herbicide or needing that the homeowners keep those walkways well-maintained.”

Tarkanian assured him there is enforcement happening.

” I have somebody who goes out when a week to go down the streets to see where we’re not looking after the turf, and we turn it in to code enforcement,” she said. “We watch our little areas like hawks.”

School Board selects firm for CCSD superintendent search

Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017|7:20 p.m.

. The Clark County School Board on Thursday picked Iowa-based recruiting company Ray and Associates to help in the look for the district’s next superintendent.

One of the earliest school executive search firms in the nation, Ray and Associates has actually assisted in superintendent searches for Broward County Public Schools in Florida, Charlotte-Mecklenurg Schools in North Carolina and the Hawaii State Department of Education. Trustees stated their tested record of results, competitive price and commitment to diversity helped set them apart from the three other search firms in the running.

This is the very first time Ray and Associates has dealt with CCSD.

Ray and Associates was chosen over San Antonio-based JG Consulting; Omaha, Neb.-based McPherson and Jacobson; and Hazard, Young, Attea and Associates from Schaumburg, Ill. JG Consulting was the school board’s 2nd option that would be used need to an agreement with Ray and Associates fail for any factor.

Ray and Associates priced their services at $43,250, plus the expense of marketing and candidate travel expenses. Their quote was the 2nd lowest of the four firms.

JG Consulting was the least expensive alternative at $40,000. The other 2 candidates were notably priced higher: Hazard, Young, Attea and Associates quoted a $75,000 base fee with additional costs for personnel expenses, marketing and background checks, and McPherson and Jacobson priced estimate $61,250 with extra costs for advertising and background checks. None of those costs included candidate travel expenses, which one consultant kept in mind can add to $1,500 each day depending on range took a trip, whether a spouse accompanies them and other aspects.

The financial cost of the superintendent search took on increased significance provided the district’s ongoing deficit spending. Trustees are presently thinking about $22 million worth of spending plan cuts at its board conference tonight and approved $43 million worth of budget cut down in August.

Trustees talked to each seeking advice from firm for an hour. Their questions concentrated on openness throughout the hiring procedure, discovering varied prospects and having an understanding of the unique needs of big school districts. CCSD is the fifth-largest district in the nation.

Outbound Trustee Linda Cavazos said she liked Ray and Associates’ technique of “over-communicating” with their customers: “Having a sincere strategy and process, and to have clear expectations, that’s important for the board.”

Trustee Chris Garvey said she appreciated the company’s experience with diverse communities throughout the country and dedication to hiring diverse candidates.

“I believe they’ll benefit CCSD,” she stated. “Our population has altered– we’re now a minority majority (district), however a great deal of our mentor staff comes from the Midwest.”

Garvey kept in mind that the school board members would need to talk about with the firm the concern of transparency. More particularly, there is not yet a consensus on when throughout the hiring process the candidates become openly known. Were the district to manage the search without the support of an outdoors firm, candidates would enter into the public record immediately– something experts state discourages leading candidates who don’t want to endanger their existing positions.

“The very best people will need to be hired– strongly hired,” stated Gary Ray, the founder and chairman of Ray and Associates.

Outbound Superintendent Pat Skorkowsky will retire in June after 30 years with the school district. He took on the top management role in 2013, and the five-year run will make him the longest-tenured superintendent given that Carlos Garcia, who stepped down in 2005 after five years.

Updated: Rent-A-Center'' s Board Weighing Purchase Alternative for 2,500-Store Chain

Retailer’s Chairman Steven Pepper Resigns Over Dispute with Board’s Decision

Rent-A-Center Inc. (NASDAQ/NGS: RCII), among the nation’s largest rent-to-own shop operators, which revealed early today plans to think about alternatives consisting of a sale of the chain which runs around 2,500 stores now has an at least one proposition to think about.

Vintage Capital Management LLC, an Orlando-based personal equity fund, made a nonbinding offer today to get all of the outstanding shares of the company for $13 per share in money.

Financiers don’t appear too fired up about the offer. Rent-A-Center’s stock leapt onlu about $1 per share to about $10.90/ share on news of the offer.

Rent-A-Center encouraged its shareholders not to take any action at this time however said it would review the offer.

[Editor’s Note: This story was upgraded Friday Nov. 3, 2017 at about 1:15 pm EST with news of the deal]

The Plano, TX-based company revealed earlier today that its chairman, Steven L. Pepper, resigned from his position efficient instantly. Pepper notified the company that his resignation was an outcome of his dispute with the board’s choice to start a tactical evaluation process for the retailer.

Rent-A-Center will suspend its stock dividend payments until it completes its review. The board’s choice follows calls from activist financiers to put the business up for sale after apparently decreasing buyout offers from a handful of private equity companies this year, consisting of an $800 million offer from private equity company Vintage Capital in June.

Engaged Capital, a Newport Beach financial investment company with a stake in the company, commended the board’s choice calling it long overdue.

“Engaged Capital thinks that Rent-A-Center stays an appealing acquisition opportunity. Our company believe the company’s strong cash flow generation, liquidity and management position in the appealing rent-to-own market integrate to underpin prospective transaction cost varieties that would permit both investors and a potential acquirer to realize considerable worth,” the business stated.

Engaged Capital also claimed Rent-A-Center previously cannot pursue reputable quotes at significant premiums to its stock cost earlier this year, including, “Engaged Capital reminds the board that our analysis shows that a strategic acquirer could recognize $300 million or more of synergies and operational enhancements.”

The firm has actually engaged J.P. Morgan as its financial advisor and Winston & & Strawn LLP as legal advisor. Rent-A-Center reported a loss this week the three months ended Sept. 30 of $12.6 million vs a $6.2 million profit for the same quarter last year.

Outdoors problem led to ban of School Board member, Skorkowsky says

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class =” photo” src =” /wp-content/uploads/2017/11/1023MissionHighSchool08_t653.JPG” alt =” Image”/ > Steve Marcus Clark County School District Board trustees, from left, Kevin Child, Carolyn Edwards, and Deanna Wright, praise throughout the official opening ceremony for Objective High School Monday, Oct. 23, 2017. The school, currently with 21 students, is the very first all-public, recovery high school in the U.S., designed for trainees in recovery from drug abuse and dependence.

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Clark County School Board member Kevin Kid was the subject of a problem from an outside government agency for his behavior on a school campus, spurring Superintendent Pat Skorkowsky to trespass and ban him from district residential or commercial property last month.

Skorkowsky pointed out that problem and numerous others from within the district– such as unannounced sees to schools, making remarks that embarrassed trainees, and threatening tasks of staff members who have actually complained about him– as factor for an Oct. 24 memo that essentially prevents him from stepping on school home.

“This is simply among the current grievances I have actually received about Trustee Child’s habits, regardless of my duplicated attempts to coach him about his habits around personnel and students, as well as efforts made by his colleagues on the board and our lawyers,” Skorkowsky said in the letter.

The government firm, which district representatives refused to identify Thursday, has actually likewise released an examination into Kid’s conduct, Skorkowsky said in the letter.

Kid stated Thursday night he thought he was trespassed as part of an effort from Skorkowsky’s office to “get payback” versus the departing superintendent’s most significant critics throughout his final months at the head of the school district. Skorkowsky, who will retire in June, vowed to work out “greater freedoms” to deal with his critics in a Sept. 7 speech announcing his retirement.

Kid, 55, has been a vocal challenger of Skorkowsky’s handling of district financial resources, which caused a budget deficit of about $80 million for the 2017-18 academic year.

“I have a no-nonsense mindset for that stuff,” Child stated, describing the budget plan.

Child stated his habits since being chosen to the school board in 2014 has actually constantly included unexpected check outs to schools, where he’ll “drop in” to provide recommendations to students. Amongst products he said might be seen as questionable consisted of a closed-eyes poll in middle school class of the number of students at one time had actually been self-destructive.

Throughout a current go to, he stated 18 of 30 trainees in a classroom had actually raised their hands to that question.

“I inform them to close their eyes and raise their hand, simply to show them that everybody wants to feel liked, which all of us have to feel loved,” he said.

Kid challenged claims that he threatened to fire district workers who grumbled about him, stating he does not have the authority to end staff member contacts.

Both Skorkowsky and Kid said the embattled trustee has disregarded the superintendent’s trespass order and continues to check out schools. Kid said that despite Skorkowsky’s cautioning to stay off campus, he’ll continue to “to be an overseer” of the district.

“I’m enthusiastic about what I do,” Child stated. “I’ve never done anything incorrect to no one.”

Rent-A-Center'' s Board Weighing Choices for 2,500-Store Chain

Seller’s Chairman Steven Pepper Resigns Over Argument with Board’s Choice

Rent-A-Center Inc. (NASDAQ/NGS: RCII), one of the nation’s largest rent-to-own store operators, announced plans to think about options consisting of a sale of the chain which runs approximately 2,500 shops in the United States, Mexico, Canada and Puerto Rico.

The Plano, TX-based business also revealed that its chairman, Steven L. Pepper, resigned from his position efficient today. Pepper notified the company that his resignation was a result of his dispute with the board’s decision to initiate a tactical review process for the merchant.

Rent-A-Center will suspend its stock dividend payments till it finishes its review. The board’s choice follows calls from activist investors to put the business up for sale after reportedly decreasing buyout offers from a handful of personal equity companies this year, consisting of an $800 million deal from private equity firm Vintage Capital in June.

Engaged Capital, a Newport Beach financial investment company with a stake in the business, commended the board’s decision calling it long past due.

“Engaged Capital believes that Rent-A-Center stays an attractive acquisition opportunity. Our company believe the business’s strong capital generation, liquidity and leadership position in the appealing rent-to-own industry combine to underpin possible transaction rate ranges that would allow both stockholders and a possible acquirer to recognize significant worth,” the company stated.

Engaged Capital likewise claimed Rent-A-Center formerly cannot pursue trustworthy quotes at significant premiums to its stock cost earlier this year, including, “Engaged Capital reminds the board that our analysis shows that a tactical acquirer could understand $300 million or more of synergies and functional improvements.”

The firm has actually engaged J.P. Morgan as its monetary consultant and Winston & & Strawn LLP as legal consultant. Rent-A-Center reported a loss this week the 3 months ended Sept. 30 of $12.6 million vs a $6.2 million profit for the very same quarter last year.

School Board OKs as much as $14 million in new spending plan cuts

Friday, Sept. 15, 2017|8:10 a.m.

. The Clark County School Board approved approximately $13.9 million in brand-new cuts as it faces a budget plan shortfall of up to $60 million.

The board anticipates the brand-new round of cuts authorized Thursday will conserve the district about $7 million to $13.9 million.

The cuts originate from the elimination of more than 272 positions and numerous services.

Schools are anticipated to make a combined $17.4 million in cuts to individual spending plans too.

Superintendent Pat Skorkowsky states they have been striving on “aiming to prevent more cuts to schools.”

The board authorized $43 million in cuts last month, and it’s most likely to approve more at the end of this month.

Clark County mulls control board to keep cannabis businesses in line

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Gosia Wozniacka/ AP A cannabis dispensary displays a sign Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, in Portland, Ore. Nevada lawmakers designed the state’s “early start” recreational cannabis program after Oregon’s. Permanent provisions won’t be established up until it expires Jan. 1, but the Clark County Commission is already going over regional rules that will align.

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Clark County commissioners desire rigorous rules in place for any marijuana companies found breaking its regional laws.

Dispensaries and growing centers operate under business licenses and special-use permits granted by the county. That implies the commissioners, who likewise meet as the Zoning Board, currently have the capability to hold a public hearing and revoke said licenses and permits, efficiently closing down a business in violation. Prior to that extreme strategy takes place, business license, zoning and air quality departments routinely investigate problems lodged against companies to ensure they are in compliance with codes.

Some commissioners don’t think that’s enough.

Arguing that the emerging cannabis industry demands more oversight than your ordinary organisation, Commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick on Tuesday floated the concept of producing a cannabis control board similar to the Gaming Control panel or Alcohol Control Board.

“This (market) is altering each day,” she stated. “Nobody knows who controls exactly what.”

Kirkpatrick referenced a commercial she saw just recently for a “weed party bus,” saying she didn’t know the legality of such an operation or exactly what options would be offered. This is not the first time such confusion has taken place. At a previous conference, commissioners had a prolonged conversation with personnel concerning whether a repeating weed yoga occasion remained in offense of regional law. (That particular establishment wound up not remaining in the county’s jurisdiction.)

A weed control board could oversee policies and the fines and charges related to breaking them within the county, Kirkpatrick stated. It likewise could keep track of the overlapping standards from various levels of federal government.

Chairman Steve Sisolak agreed with the idea of a board to assist with disciplinary issues. He has actually been singing about his dissatisfaction with exactly what he sees as “slaps on the wrist” for services skirting the law or attempting to press the limits of what is permissible in regards to occasions and promo.

“We are the gold requirement for video gaming, and I want to be the gold standard in the cannabis industry,” he has stated previously.

On June 21, just before leisure marijuana sales started, DigiPath Labs was brought before the Zoning Board for sending out an e-mail promoting a third-party event that paired food and marijuana. (The occasion was later canceled.) In hopes of preventing a public hearing and possible license cancellation, the medical marijuana company offered its own penalty, much the way that universities do after entering water with the NCAA.

DigiPath Labs’ offer included a contribution of $50,000 to a medical study on drug abuse, the creation and offering of academic lectures regarding marijuana, and the production and circulation of handbooks on leisure cannabis laws.

The commissioners accepted the suggestions and decided not to continue with the cancellation procedure, but a number of stressed that such a service was not feasible in the long term. Personnel agreed that clear standards are had to make sure constant application among all companies. They likewise warned that the recreational marijuana market would run on momentary provisions until Jan. 1, such that waiting may be sensible in order to align with long-term ones.

Jacqueline Holloway, the county’s director of service licensing, informed the commissioners on Tuesday that staff are already part of a “joint enforcement group” that includes her department, Metro and the city towns. That group is checking out the concern of weed party buses, to name a few things.

“We’re beginning to gather information and be proactive,” Holloway stated.

When inquired about marijuana-related arrests since recreational sales began July 1, Holloway stated she just knew of one.

The commissioners took no action on creating a weed control panel, but the concern of increased analysis of marijuana-related services is most likely to continue.

“Individuals need to know we’re serious,” Kirkpatrick stated.

Also on Tuesday, the commissioners accepted an organisation impact study on a proposed ordinance to forbid the ownership or ad of cannabis at local airports. That regulation is up for adoption on Aug. 1.