Tag Archives: clues

Research Study: Brain Proteins, Patterns Reveal Clues to Understanding Epilepsy

New treatments might be on the horizon for individuals dealing with epilepsy or stress and anxiety, thanks to a development discovery by UNLV, Tufts University School of Medication, and a global team of scientists studying how proteins engage to control the shooting of brain cells.

The research study, published Tuesday in Nature Communications, supplies new insight into ways to regulate a specialized “compartment” of cells in the brain that controls their signaling. If researchers and physicians can influence that compartment, they can control the firing of brain cells, which might in turn stop or avoid seizures, among other things.

UNLV neuroscientist and lead author Rochelle Hines stated managing patterns of activity are crucial to the brain’s function.

“If we can better comprehend how the brain patterns activity, we can comprehend how it may go wrong in a disorder like epilepsy, where brain activity ends up being uncontrolled,” Hines stated. “And if we can comprehend exactly what is necessary for this control, we can develop much better techniques for treating and enhancing the lifestyle for people with epileptic seizures and possibly other types of conditions as well, such as stress and anxiety or sleep disorders.”

The six-year task moved one step better to answering decades-old questions about brain wave control, by quantitatively defining how 2 crucial proteins– the GABAA receptor a2 subunit and collybistin– connect. When the interaction was interrupted in rodent models, EEG tests showed brain waves moving out of control, mimicking patterns seen in humans with epilepsy and stress and anxiety.

“That’s the piece that might potentially change books: Previously, we had questions about how these pieces fit together and thought that possibly a group of three or more proteins communicated,” Hines stated. “However our group’s research strongly suggests that there’s an extremely specific interaction in between 2 of them, and this has implications for how neuroscientists may be able to manage this location.”

Collaborating the research effort was Stephen Moss, teacher of neuroscience at Tufts and director of the AstraZeneca Lab for Basic and Translational Neuroscience in Boston. Moss said that the study results must stimulate the development of drugs that target the GABAA receptor a2 subunit as new, more efficient treatments for epilepsy.

Hines and her other half, UNLV psychology teacher Dustin Hines, worked together on the job with researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston USA, where Rochelle was a post-doctoral fellow with Moss; as well as the University of Wurzburg in Germany; University of Turin in Italy; University of Zurich in Switzerland; University College London in the UK; and the IMED Biotech Unit of AstraZeneca, Boston USA.

The research study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the German Quality Initiative.

Genetic counseling can offer crucial clues in assisting medical professionals fight particular types of cancer

Monday, May 21, 2018|2 a.m.

Around five to 10 percent of all cancers have a hereditary element. What does that mean and how can that details be leveraged to make better choices?

Genetic threat assessments and counseling are crucial in early detection efforts as well as customizing treatment strategies.

In the last few years, a few public figures have actually made headlines for discovering a hereditary anomaly and taking proactive action. Stories such as theirs reveal the benefits of such screening. Angelina Jolie had a double mastectomy in February 2013 after discovering she carried the BRCA1 gene. If she were to take no action, a breast-cancer diagnosis was a near certainty (90 percent) in her future. Nearly two years after the double mastectomy, Jolie had her ovaries and Fallopian tubes removed to stay one step ahead of an ovarian cancer medical diagnosis.

At the core of Jolie’s decisions? Cancer genetic therapy.

The therapy does not expose certainties– not everybody with a mutation in a cancer gene will establish cancer, but the mutation greatly increases the threat.

Some of the common genes that might contribute to a cancer diagnosis consist of TP53, BRCA1, BRCA2 and PTEN. According to the American Cancer Society, mutations in specific genes are attributed to more than 50 hereditary cancer syndromes. Lots of people with the previously mentioned altered genes develop cancer at more youthful ages than the remainder of the population. Hereditary testing for those who are at high threat is now recommended and a standard of care in oncology today.

It is very important to understand if you or your member of the family have a genetic predisposition to cancer, as there are now choices to lower the risk of getting cancer. Management care plans can consist of specific cancer screening examinations, medications and/or preventative surgery. Treatment alternatives are customized to an individual’s risks and lifestyle. If possible, the very best individual in the family to test is the individual who already has cancer.

The Threat Assessment and Test

Preliminary cancer hereditary counseling sessions normally take less than an hour. A clinician will gather your personal case history, family history, supply education and gather your DNA by means of an easy saliva or blood DNA test.

After one’s case history, family history is the structure for a danger evaluation and the basis for determining those individuals who are at an increased danger for developing specific cancers.

Both your mom’s and dad’s history will be gotten in addition to histories for your aunties, uncles, grandparents, brother or sisters and your kids. A cancer genetic counselor wishes to know who has had cancer, what type of cancer they were diagnosed with and how old they were when they were identified. These histories will identify whether further discussion or hereditary screening for a hereditary cancer syndrome is required. If it is identified that testingw is suggested, instructional materials on cancer genetics and hereditary syndromes will be supplied.

Meeting a cancer hereditary counselor is another essential action. During the session, you will be provided with info on the particular test being carried out, what the results mean, psychological implications of test results, confidentiality issues and the choices for threat estimate without genetic testing. Furthermore, you will learn more about the threat of passing a gene mutation to a kid, fees associated with screening, options and limitations of medical surveillance and methods for prevention after testing and the importance of sharing your hereditary test results with at-risk family members.

The actual cancer hereditary testing requires a saliva (buccal) sample. It is an easy treatment and takes a matter of minutes. The saliva is gathered in a tube and obtains the DNA from the lining of your mouth, which is then processed in a laboratory for analysis. There is also the option of a blood draw if shown.

Outcomes are generally offered 2 to 3 weeks after testing. These personal outcomes are revealed in a way soz that you can comprehend the ramifications of a positive, unfavorable or undetermined result. Patients can anticipate assistance on the best ways to share the outcomes with relative and how test results may affect them. There are many medical management options available to those who evaluate positive and you will be described the suitable medical provider for follow up.

Comprehensive Cancer Centers is committed to offering the best care to its patients. Launching the cancer hereditary screening program assists guarantee that we have the ability to provide to our clients the most existing and advised services in oncology care. This program is the first to Southern Nevada in an oncology practice. We welcome all clients in our community and eagerly anticipate helping survivors and to recognize “previvors,” those who have mutations however are not affected by cancer.

Barbara Caldwell, MSN, APRN is a cancer genetic therapist at Comprehensive Cancer Centers. With more than 40 years of experience in medicine, Caldwell sees clients at four Detailed treatment centers throughout Southern Nevada. For more details see www.cccnevada.com / cancer-genetic-counse