Tag Archives: court

Leading Nevada court turns down appeal of guy who fatally shot child

Monday, Dec. 4, 2017|6 p.m.

Carson City–.

The Nevada Supreme Court Monday declined the appeal of Jerry Pough Sr. who was sentenced to life with parole for the 2009 fatal shooting of his child in an evident argument in a cars and truck in Las Vegas.

The court declined Pough’s claim that the district court was wrong in permitting him to represent himself at trial regardless of the reality he was mentally ill.

He preserved he was detected with schizophrenia when he made his choice to go it alone at trial. He had actually been evaluated mentally ill previously however was later found proficient to represent himself.

In its choice, the court stated, “Nothing in the record recommends that Pough’s mental disorder kept him from understanding the dangers of self-representation or otherwise making an understanding, voluntary and smart choice.”

The trial took place in 2014 after a delay over concerns about his mental illness and the congested court calendar in Las Vegas.

Pough, now 61 years old, was in the traveler seat of a car when he shot his child Jerry Jr., the motorist, in the head over an evident argument over the direction of the automobile.

Captured on video: Sex culprit attacked in court by another detainee

<aChristopher Elwell, 29, had just learned how much time he'd be serving in prison for sexually assaulting a 4-year-old girl, when another prisoner attacked him in court. (WMUR via CNN)< img src=" /wp-content/uploads/2017/12/15535390_G.png" alt=" Christopher Elwell, 29, had simply learned how much time he 'd be serving in prison for sexually attacking a 4-year-old girl, when another detainee attacked him in court. (WMUR through CNN)"

title=” Christopher Elwell, 29, had actually just found out just how much time he ‘d be serving in prison for sexually attacking a 4-year-old lady, when another prisoner assaulted him in court. (WMUR through CNN)” border=” 0 “width=” 180″/ >

Christopher Elwell, 29, had just discovered how much time he ‘d be serving in jail for sexually assaulting a 4-year-old girl, when another prisoner attacked him in court. (WMUR through CNN). (Meredith)– Minutes after a male was sentenced to jail for sexually assaulting a 4-year-old girl, another detainee assaulted him in a New Hampshire courtroom. Christopher Elwell, 29, discovered he would be providing to 15 years behind bars on Thursday. As he sat down after his sentencing, Josiah Davies headbutted him numerous times, WMUR-TV reported. Authorities said Davies was shackled and was awaiting a hearing on a probation violation.

The Strafford County Attorney’s Workplace said the 2 didn’t know each other which it should have been something about Elwell’s case that set Davies off.

Elwell sexually attacked a 4-year-old lady in June, when the victim went to a pajama party with 2 other kids at the offender’s home in Dover, inning accordance with the New Hampshire Union Leader.

Following his arrest, Elwell reportedly confessed to remaining in a bed room with the children and seeing pornography on his cellular phone. He then informed the 4-year-old he wanted to imitate what was seen in the video.

Elwell pleaded guilty to attacking the woman and received a 7 1/2- to 15-year prison sentence.

He also pleaded guilty for cannot register as a sex transgressor after being convicted of sexually attacking a 14-year-old woman in 2008.

Meanwhile, the Stratford County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the courtroom event. County Lawyer Emily Conant told WMUR-TV that Davies could deal with 3 1/2 to 7 years in jail.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Copyright 2017 Meredith Corporation. All rights scheduled.

Nevada Supreme Court Holding Marijuana Circulation Hearing at UNLV

On Tuesday, UNLV’s William S. Boyd School of Law will play host to a critical hearing of the Nevada State Supreme Court that is expected to clarify a few of the policies around Nevada’s growing leisure marijuana industry.

Last November citizens approved Question 2, which legalized recreational marijuana in Nevada. The law officially took effect in January. Oversight of recreational pot was offered to the Nevada Department of Taxation, which has been working on developing the structure to manage the brand-new industry. The expense approved preliminary distribution rights to carry leisure pot solely to certified liquor suppliers. After 18 months, other companies would be enabled to get their own licenses. The state’s tax department has coped liquor suppliers over whether those distributors alone are capable of dealing with distribution for the brand-new market.

How did we get here?

Half a year after citizens approved Question 2, the Department of Taxation embraced a regulation in Might that laid out specific requirements for alcohol distributors to request distribution licensure. The Independent Alcohol Distributors of Nevada, or IADON, challenged this new policy in court, implicating the department of making up “ad hoc” guidelines that might weaken their 18-month “monopoly” on licensed cannabis circulation.

In June the First Judicial District Court disallowed the Department of Tax from issuing licenses to non-liquor suppliers, up until it had actually clarified its meaning for sufficiency.

In July, the department, seeking to adhere to the court’s ruling, embraced an emergency situation regulation that stated criteria to identify if alcohol suppliers on their own sufficed to serve the marketplace, inning accordance with court filings. Meanwhile, retail sales of leisure cannabis began. In July, the state saw sales of more than $27.1 million– producing $3.68 million in tax revenue that will be split in between the state’s Rainy Day Fund and its schools.

On Aug. 10, the state held a public hearing on its emergency regulation, but IADON claims that its members were not paid for due process throughout that meeting. Last month, IADON and another entity, PALIDIN LLC, attracted the Nevada Supreme Court, challenging whether administrative agencies have the power to produce emergency situation policies without evidence that “an emergency situation really exists.” The alcohol distributors hope the court will declare the emergency guideline itself invalid.

Inning accordance with the Department of Taxation, on the other hand, the district court did state that interested parties at the August hearing “were paid for the chance to present evidence and testament” which statement at the hearing “supported a need to expand the marijuana distributor certified to more than alcohol distributors.” What is UNLV’s function?

UNLV Law will host the Nevada Supreme Court on Tuesday for a hearing that will attempt to solve the claim produced by IADON. The hearing is an opportunity for law students to have a front row seat in the disputation of an important legal issue.”As far as the law school and to us at the law journal it’s absolutely exciting to have them come do this here,” says Stephanie Glantz, a third-year law student and editor in chief of the Nevada Law Journal.

As it ends up, students at the law journal are also working on a white paper to examine the legal ramifications of Nevada’s new recreational cannabis market Authored by Alysa Grimes, Beatrice Aguirre, and Brent Resh, this report, focused on deepening the courts’ and legal bodies’ understanding of key issues, ought to be released in March.

How common is it for alcohol suppliers to have any function in marijuana distribution in other states?

It’s not typical at all, and for good reason. Heather Azzi, Elder Project Counsel with the Washington, D.C.-based Cannabis Policy Project– and the author of Nevada’s initiative– states the state’s alcohol suppliers are a diverse group. Nevertheless, all have federal licenses for wholesale alcohol circulation– those licenses could be in jeopardy to liquor suppliers who aim to participate the marijuana service; a reality that the suppliers understand.

“I think a lot of the larger alcohol suppliers and maybe even a few of the smaller sized ones have believed really seriously about getting included with this,” says Azzi. “Those that currently have a very rewarding service model going probably weren’t going to take the danger.

So why did liquor companies get involved in the first place?

Azzi says more states working to legalize leisure cannabis are looking at producing self-reliance in the distribution system, to prevent tax evasion, which is much easier if one entity controls production, distribution and retail, as well as diversion– the siphoning away of items either across state lines or to target populations such as children.

The concept in turning to alcohol suppliers was that they had experience and understanding in transferring regulated items. “In the short term,” says Azzi, “it would have permitted the procedure to obtain operating very quickly with very little difficulty.”

Still, considered that medical cannabis dispensaries in Nevada do have experience transferring marijuana for medical functions, why bring liquor in at all?

“I think it’s simply a matter of timing,” says lawyer Amanda Connor, partner with Connor & & Connor, a company that represents licenses holders on the medical cannabis side, consisting of dispensaries, growing and production facilities. “When the initiative petition was prepared and getting signatures there wasn’t a robust or open medical marijuana market. They wished to integrate in some trust and make individuals feel great it would be carried safely.”

Connor and Julie Monteiro, editor of Marijuana Nurses publication, likewise suggest alcohol suppliers were composed into the initiative into assist protect funding had to actually get it on last November’s tally.

Exactly what are the crucial problems here?

The crucial problems are truly procedural ones: How does the state define “sufficiency” in determining whether liquor suppliers have the capability to supply sufficient circulation?

“If it boils down to that question it’s going to be tough for them to win on that. The tax department made its evaluation,” states David Orentlicher, Cobeaga Law practice professor of law and co-director of the UNLV Health Law Program. “The courts on these kinds of issues tend to accept the specialist agency. Is the court in a much better position to sort the facts and judge whether they’re sufficient or not? They’re going to be inclined to accept the tax department.”

He adds that IADON might have more luck on the procedural concerns concerning whether they received a fair hearing on Aug. 10 and whether the state’s stated “emergency situation” actually makes up one.

Still, even that is no assurance that their privileged 18-month window will hold. “If they win all they may get is for the tax department to redo the process in a more purposeful way,” states Orentlicher. “If they lose, they lose. If they win, it doesn’t preclude the tax department from revisiting it and say we’ll do a more fancy procedure. It may just postpone things.”

And Azzi notes that, since the ballot effort provides the Department of Taxation discretion, “at some time their decision will be deemed not an approximate choice or a capricious choice. And as soon as we get to that point the court will support that decision. And that will be completion of it.”

Exactly what occurs to the liquor suppliers?

Even if the supreme court enables the Department of Taxation to open up the application to a larger survey of interested parties, liquor suppliers will still have the ability to apply for a license. “They’re not being put out of organisation,” says Orentlicher. “They’re just losing another financially rewarding chance to expand their service.”

Nevertheless, as soon as distribution business get developed, he says, “it’s harder for a brand-new company to come in.”

Monteiro thinks about the matter in blunter terms.

“Any entity that has any federal ties need to not even be near marijuana, period,” she states. “Why is alcohol being so challenging? They have actually currently made their millions. Let the flood gates come for other individuals.”

Mock Trial Team is the Court Prior to the Storm

Jamie McInelly read the notes on her character lots of times. She rehearsed her lines when driving to school and clocked in countless hours of practicing her body movement in front of the mirror.

This might seem like the normal routine of a star, but McInelly is not a theatrical performer. She is a hopeful lawyer, and the function she is playing is that of a witness in a mock trial case. McInelly, a criminal justice major, is among 18 trainees who compose the UNLV Wrongdoer Justice Mock Trial Group.

” I always like the concept of law school but I didn’t recognize how much of a dream it was till I joined the group,” McInelly said.

The group is open to all undergraduate majors. To prepare the next generation of trial advocates, the group completes in regional and national competitions. Trainees invest the academic year taking classes in trial advocacy, and arguing in front of practicing attorneys and judges from Southern Nevada.

” I used to hate public speaking, however it’s now second nature to me so that’s a fear I conquered,” McInelly said.

Joel Lieberman, chairman of UNLV’s criminal justice department, stated competitors gives trainees the opportunity to fine-tune their crucial thinking and presentation abilities, while applying class understanding in an experiential learning setting.

” The mock trial team is a great method for building trainee self-confidence,” Lieberman stated.

The mock trial program is 3 years of ages, however its members and coaches are currently wanting to take UNLV’s team to the nationwide stage.

Judging from the team’s recent performance, it might be well on its way. In February, the members made it past regionals and advanced to the Opening Round Champion Series in Fresno, California.

” I wanted to cry,” McInelly said. “It was a proud moment to hear our name called, and to understand that we was among 8 teams to advance.”

The UNLV criminal justice department also co-hosted the regional 2017 Rebel-Trojan All-in Mock Trial Tournament this previous January with the University of Southern California at the William S. Boyd School of Law at UNLV.

This year’s competition required students to present a case on age discrimination. Competitions require trainees to function as attorneys for the prosecution and defense, and act as witnesses. Trainees should make opening and closing declarations, concern witnesses, and argue rules of evidence.

At the Rebel Trojan Tournament, Matthew Nardone, a UNLV criminal justice trainee who graduated last year, got an award for best lawyer. Katarina Roach, a UNLV criminal justice trainee who graduated this year, received an award for outstanding witness.

Getting Mentorship Before Making Profession Choices

Jason Mitchell, the team’s coach and faculty consultant, is constructing the mock trial group into a mentorship and networking platform for undergrads and high school students interested in pursuing careers in criminal justice or law.

“There’s a substantial disconnect between textbooks and exactly what goes on in the real world,” Mitchell said. Occasions like an upcoming scrimmage in between the team and UNLV law trainees, he stated, acts as a wake-up call.

Mitchell has 2 law degrees and worked at the United States federal public protector’s Las Vegas workplace. The team’s assistant coach, Robson Hauser, is a Las Vegas public protector. Local judges administer in team practice trials and in Mitchell’s classes which alternate between civil and criminal cases each academic year. Clark County Municipal Judge Martin D. Hastings is set up to preside in a mock trial for Mitchell’s class this fall and Clark County District Lawyer Steve Wolfson once served as a judge for a mock trial.

“I have an interest in trainees contending, however eventually, I have an interest in guaranteeing students are prepared to pick up a case file, walk into a court and attempt a case,” Mitchell stated. “The classes and group experience offer a hint of what’s to come and what’s waiting on trainees so they can make a notified decision if law school is for them,” Mitchell stated.

McInelly is prepared. A former psychology major, she was carefully picked by Mitchell to join the mock trial team, which cemented her goal pursue law. With her criminal justice degree in hand, she’ll go to law school in 2018.

Illinois court upholds murder conviction of Drew Peterson

Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017|9:10 a.m.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill.– The use of hearsay testament to convict previous Chicago-area policeman Drew Peterson in the death of his third better half appertained, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled Thursday in maintaining the conviction.

The high court, in an unanimous decision, found that hearsay statement from Peterson’s dead 3rd better half and missing fourth partner did not violate his constitutional right to challenge his accusers since of evidence that Peterson eliminated them to prevent their testimony.

The 63-year-old previous authorities sergeant from the Chicago residential area of Bolingbrook is serving a 38-year sentence in the 2004 death of ex-wife Kathleen Savio. He’ll follow that with 40 more years after a conviction in 2015 on claims that he plotted to kill the prosecutor who put him behind bars.

Savio’s body was discovered in a dry bath tub in 2004, weeks before a set up hearing to identify financial and child custody problems related to her divorce from Peterson. Her death was at first ruled accidental, however the case was reopened after the 2007 disappearance of Peterson’s fourth wife, Stacy Peterson. Savio’s body was exhumed, an autopsy was conducted and her death was ruled a murder.

Stacy Peterson is presumed dead, though her body has actually never been discovered. Drew Peterson stays a suspect in her disappearance, however he has never been charged.

Prosecutors had no physical proof connecting Peterson to Savio’s death and no witnesses placing him at the scene, so they relied on hearsay– statements Savio made to family members and in a written declaration to cops prior to she passed away and that Stacy Peterson made to her pastor and a divorce lawyer prior to she disappeared.

Rumor is any info reported by a witness that is not based on the witness’ direct understanding. The Illinois court’s judgment, written by Justice Margaret Theis, discovered appropriate usage of hearsay– generally forbidden in criminal procedures due to the fact that it cannot be challenged– under a legal doctrine of “loss by misdeed.”

“We can not state that the trial court’s finding that the state showed that accused murdered Kathleen to avoid her from testifying was ‘unreasonable, approximate, or not based on the proof presented,'” Theis composed.

An attorney for Peterson did not instantly respond to a request for discuss the ruling.

Illinois embraced a hearsay law in 2008 customized to Drew Peterson’s case, dubbed “Drew’s Law,” which helped in making a few of the evidence admissible.

Peterson was moved from a state jail in Chester, Illinois, to a federal jail in Terre Haute, Indiana, in February, after Illinois prison authorities cited concerns that he presented a security hazard.

Judge Judy releases dog in court to find true owner

Court proceedings can be stressful, especially when custody and ownership play a roll. This time, however, the pup played the judge. (Photo: YouTube: Big Brother Fans)< img src=" /wp-content/uploads/2017/08/14694771_G.jpg" alt= "Court procedures can be demanding, particularly when custody and ownership play a roll. This time, however, the puppy played the judge. (Photo: YouTube: Big Brother Fans)"

title=” Court proceedings can be demanding, specifically when custody and ownership play a roll. This time, nevertheless, the puppy played the judge.

( Image: YouTube: Big Sibling Fans )” border=” 0″ width= “180”/ > Court procedures can be demanding, particularly when custody and ownership play a roll. This time, however, the puppy played the judge. (Photo: YouTube: Big Brother Fans ). Court proceedings can be difficult, specifically when custody and ownership play a roll. This time, however, the pup played the judge. In a conflict between a man and a lady, both claimed ownership of the dog. The lady declared she purchased the dog from somebody off the street. The male was adamant that the canine came from him.

In order to figure out the owner, Judge Judy ordered the canine be set loose in the court space.

And think what? The pet went to its owner.

Mobile Users Click Here To See The Video.

Copyright 2017 (Meredith Corporation). All rights booked.

Greek Orthodox church intends to block home sale in court

Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017|8:42 p.m.

AMMAN, Jordan– The Greek Orthodox patriarch in the Holy Land announced Saturday that his church will appeal an Israeli court choice that approved the sale of prime church home to business representing Jews looking for to expand their presence in Jerusalem’s Old City.

The church had challenged the property deal in court for the previous decade, arguing it was carried out unlawfully by the since-deposed previous patriarch and was for that reason void.

The Jerusalem District Court supported the offer two weeks ago, paving the way for three big residential or commercial properties near the Old City’s Jaffa Gate to be leased for 99 years to Ateret Cohanim, a group that has been buying properties for Jews in typically Arab areas of Jerusalem.

Patriarch Theophilos III alleged Saturday that the lower court ruling was “politically inspired” and stated the church would interest Israel’s Supreme Court.

The church will do “whatever within its power so that this unjustified ruling will be overturned,” he stated at a news conference in the Jordanian capital of Amman.

Theophilos leads a predominantly Arab flock of 220,000 Christians in Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian territories.

The Greek Orthodox church is among the biggest homeowner in the Holy Land, consisting of in Jerusalem’s Old City, one of the most delicate locations of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The Old City is part of east Jerusalem, captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war, along with the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The Palestinians wish to establish a state in the war-won lands, with east Jerusalem as a capital.

Israel’s current federal government declines any partition of Jerusalem as part of a possible peace offer. Since 1967, some 200,000 Jews have actually settled in east Jerusalem areas developed for them by succeeding Israeli federal governments, making partition increasingly tough. In addition, Jewish inhabitant groups have purchased homes in Arab communities.

The patriarch likewise expressed issue about exactly what he stated was an effort by some members of Israel’s parliament to limit the rights of his church and other Christian denominations in the Holy Land to deal individually with their property holdings.

He urged the heads of churches to find a joint response to “this alarming and severe development” that he stated will impact Christians in the area and worldwide.

“We can not worry too extremely the extreme seriousness of the circumstance,” Theophilos stated. He contacted world leaders to intervene.

Over the last few years, there have actually been growing stress between the primarily Greek church management and the Arab flock, consisting of over the administration of the huge residential or commercial property holdings and land leases to Israel in west Jerusalem.

Critics have actually consistently demanded that the church offer information about its holdings.

On Saturday, church officials declined to answer when asked about the holdings.

U.S. court upends murder conviction of Blackwater professional

Friday, Aug. 4, 2017|2:03 p.m.

WASHINGTON– A federal appeals court on Friday reversed the first-degree murder conviction of a former Blackwater security professional, ordering a new trial for the guy district attorneys say fired the very first shots in the 2007 slayings of 14 Iraqi civilians at a crowded traffic circle in Baghdad.

In a split viewpoint, the three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit ruled a lower court erred by not permitting Nicholas Slatten to be tried independently from his 3 co-defendants in 2014. The 33-year-old specialist from Tennessee is serving a life sentence for his role in the killings, which strained global relations and drew intense scrutiny of the role of American contractors in the Iraq War.

The court also bought new sentences for the three other contractors, Paul Slough, Evan Liberty and Dustin Heard. They were each condemned of manslaughter and firearms charges bring mandatory 30-year terms.

The judges figured out those sentences breached the constitutional prohibition of cruel and unusual penalty due to the fact that district attorneys charged them with using military firearms while dedicating another felony. That statute, normally employed against gang members or bank robbers, had actually never ever previously been utilized against abroad security specialists working for the United States government.

A representative for the United States attorney’s workplace in Washington said district attorneys were still reviewing the decision and had no instant remark.

Bill Coffield, a lawyer for Liberty, said he planned to meet with Liberty to evaluate their choices. “Undoubtedly we’re pleased with the court’s decision in regards to the unconstitutionality of the sentence,” he stated.

At the weekslong trial kept in 2014, federal prosecutors and defense attorney presented really various versions of what set off the September 2007 massacre in Nisour Square.

The government described the killings as a one-sided ambush of unarmed civilians, while the defense stated the guards opened fire only after a white Kia sedan seen as a possible suicide car bomb began moving quickly towards their convoy. After the shooting stopped, no proof of a bomb found.

In issuing their ruling benefiting the accuseds, the judges said they remained in no way excusing the scary of occasions they stated “defies civilized description.”

“In reaching this conclusion, we by no methods plan to decrease the carnage attributable to Slough, Heard and Liberty’s actions,” said U.S. Circuit Judge Karen L. Henderson, composing for the court. “Their bad judgments resulted in the deaths of lots of innocent people.”

Taylor Swift, ex-radio host head to court over groping claim

Image

John Salangsang/ Invision/ AP Taylor Swift carries out at the DirecTV Now Super Saturday Night Show at Club Nomadic on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017 in Houston, Texas.

Friday, Aug. 4, 2017|2:05 p.m.

DENVER– Taylor Swift and her assistance team didn’t call cops after she stated she had been groped by a Denver radio host throughout an image session before a concert.

Rather, they called his manager, and David Mueller lost his job. The video jockey later on took legal action against the singer-songwriter, stating he had actually been incorrectly accused and wanted $3 million in damages.

Swift countersued, declaring sexual assault, establishing a civil trial set to start Monday in federal court in Denver that will largely turn on who the eight-member jury thinks.

Swift is scheduled to affirm. Both sides say no settlement remains in the works.

The claims provide differing accounts of backstage events before Swift performed at a 2013 concert at the Pepsi Center in Denver.

Swift aimed to keep the circumstance “discreet and peaceful and confidential” and was distressed by Mueller’s claim that “for some reason she might have some incentive to actually make this story,” her attorney, Douglas Baldridge, has actually argued in court.

Swift is looking for a verdict that awards her $1, while holding Mueller accountable and “acting as an example to other women who might resist publicly reliving similar outrageous and embarrassing acts,” her lawsuit states.

Some entertainment lawyers state celebrities often want to deal with such scenarios outside court.

“When celebs choose to take legal action, it’s going to hit the press, they’re going to be called as a witness and they have to hang out with that,” stated Tre Lovell, a California-based lawyer who represents production and entertainment management companies.

“They do not necessarily want that. They want to concentrate on their career, their brand names, their sponsorships. They have a whole profits stream that’s at stake,” Lovell stated.

With a lot at stake, Michael Niborski, a lawyer whose company represents Bruno Mars and Kanye West, stated Swift “is especially well-suited to represent women’s rights, female empowerment and not taking this type of behavior.”

Mueller, then 51, was an early morning host at a Denver country-music station when he was designated to participate in Swift’s June 2, 2013, show.

Swift, then 23, was exploring in support of her “Red” album, with hits such as “I Understood You Were Difficulty” and “We Are Never ever Ever Returning Together.”

Mueller and his girlfriend lined up backstage with other fans for a meet-and-greet with Swift and went into a curtained enclosure where they spoke briefly with the singer-songwriter.

A guard and a minimum of 2 other Swift team members were present when it came time for a picture. Mueller stated he delved into the image at the last second.

Mueller stated Swift was cordial as he and his sweetheart left. He went to his cars and truck to drop off an autographed picture then returned to the arena, where he was faced by Swift’s guard.

In court files, Swift stated, “He took his hand and put it up my gown and grabbed onto my ass cheek, and no matter what does it cost? I scooted over, it was still there.”

She stated she fulfilled and greeted other fans, then reported the incident to the guard and a photographer.

Mueller rejected wrongly touching Swift and said he informed the guard: “Please call the authorities. I didn’t do anything.”

Under regional law, such an act would warrant a misdemeanor charge of unlawful sexual conduct, which carries a maximum possible sentence of two years in prison. No criminal charges are pending.

After escorting Mueller from the arena, a member of Swift’s group called Mueller’s boss and asked that suitable action be taken.

The radio station talked to Mueller and fired him, mentioning a morality provision in his agreement that enables his company to fire him for conduct that could reflect unfavorably on the station or its sponsors, court documents say.

The documents also say an agent of the station stated Mueller had actually altered his story from not having touched Swift to potentially touching her incidentally or mistakenly.

Mueller’s lawyer, Gabriel McFarland, argues that Mueller might have been misidentified after somebody else touched Swift.

He also says the security guard did not respond to anything during the backstage meeting and that as many as 20 other people took pictures with Swift after Mueller left.

The trial is being kept in U.S. District Court since the Mueller and Swift reside in separate states and the matter involves a claim for damages greater than $75,000.

Convicted killer, 17, smiles in court throughout sentencing

CNN –

A 17-year-old convicted of murder smiled and laughed during his sentencing Monday.

The habits angered the judge so much that he asked prosecutors to take the case to trial rather of accepting a plea deal.

Danta Wright beinged in court smiling and almost laughing as a mother shed tears for her boy – shot and eliminated by Wright.

“I have actually lost laughter and love. I no longer have the hope of having grandchildren. I’ve lost the satisfaction of holidays, birthdays and of everyday life,” stated Courtney Klee, who read a declaration from Jordan Klee’s mother.

Wright addressed the court showing no regret.

“I just wan na tell y’ all I’ll be home soon (inaudible). I love my family,” he said.

The judge, plainly fed up with the defendant’s mindset, stopped the proceedings and asked the prosecution to think about taking this case to trial where Wright would deal with a stiffer penalty if found guilty by a jury.

“I have actually been viewing you sit there, smile and laugh and shake your head like this was no big deal. I’m really lured to simply state I’m not going to accept this sentence contract. You will go to trial and if you’re founded guilty of felony murder you’ll go to jail for the rest of your life and that indicates you’ll pass away there,” Judge David Swartz said.

This is not the first time the teen has shocked the courtroom.

Back in June during a pretrial hearing, he confessed he shot and killed 18-year-old Jordan Klee.

In October 2016, Wright said he and two other buddies were aiming to rob Klee when he shot the teenager in the back of the head, killing him.

The victim, a senior at Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor, was described as a high accomplishing student and football professional athlete.

“This year was expected to be a year of event. Of senior images with prom, graduation and parties. Rather it was a headache, a headache no parent need to ever endure,” Courtney Klee checked out.

Ultimately, the victim’s family chose not to take the case to trial and move on with sentencing.

The defense attorney apologized on behalf of the 17-year-old.

“His smiling was in no chance implied as ill-mannered either to the household, to the victim or to this court,” Defense Attorney David Goldstein said.

Wright was sentenced to 23 to 50 years for heist, felony firearm and 2nd degree murder.

Two other teens that pleaded guilty for their roles in the murder will be sentenced in September.

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