Tag Archives: enough

Dean convicted of shooting student in head for not selling enough cannabis

BOSTON (AP)– A previous high school dean referred to as an anti-violence supporter was convicted Thursday of shooting and nearly killing a student he had recruited to sell cannabis for him.

Shaun Harrison, 58, was found guilty of all charges, including armed assault with intent to murder, by a Suffolk Superior Court jury in its second day of deliberations.

“Shaun Harrison was truly a fraud, he was living a lie, and it was clearly exposed in this case,” District Lawyer Dan Conley stated. “Not only was he not a male of God or a role model for youths, he manipulated them in a way that was extremely offensive.”

Harrison, who had worked as a dean at Boston English High School for five years, recruited 17-year-old Luis Rodriguez to offer marijuana for him at the school and shot him on March 3, 2015, because he believed the student was not producing sufficient sales and keeping loan.

Rodriguez, now 20, testified that he came from a dysfunctional family and trusted Harrison, who students nicknamed “Rev.”

“He was my therapist. I went to him for whatever,” Rodriguez stated during the two-week trial.

On the day of the shooting, the pair set up to meet at a gas station where Harrison was expected to hand over some drugs.

Harrison shot the student in the back of the head and left on foot, prosecutors said. The bullet got in Rodriguez’s head simply under his best ear. It just missed his carotid artery, broke his jawbone and triggered nerve damage and hearing loss.

Rodriguez stated he was conserved by occupants of a passing vehicle, who called 911.

Bruce Carroll, Harrison’s lawyer, asked why Rodriguez did not right away identify his client as the shooter despite the fact that he was mindful and alert.

Rodriguez had told hospital staff he was shot by among his cannabis clients throughout a bungled drug offer, Carroll stated.

“It took me a while to get all my ideas back together after being shot in the head, sir,” Rodriguez stated during cross-examination. “I was in such denial. I understood who did it. Naturally, I understood who did it.”

Sentencing is arranged for Friday.

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Outlet Center Leasing Appears Strong Enough to Stand Up To 9 West Closures

Shoe and clothing wholesaler 9 West Holdings Inc.’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization filing this week focused the retail spotlight on the outlet center sector of the industrial property market. In spite of the problem that Nine West is closing all 70 of its shops, fortunately is that renting demand for outlet shop space has been surpassing availabilities.

Privately held 9 West’s filing seeks to restructure about $1.6 billion in financial obligation, much of it racked up when private equity firm Sycamore Partners Management obtained the company and associated brand names in the 2014 for $2.2 billion.

While 80 percent of Nine West’s sales originate from wholesale operations, it also runs 70 brick-and-mortar retailers – all of which it has actually now closed and is asking the court to cancel the leases on those areas. Sixty-seven of those areas remained in outlet centers.

The shop closures hit 2 openly traded retail property owners hardest. Simon Home Group (NYSE: SPG)will lose 35 stores. Simon owns and runs a portfolio of 91 centers through Simon Premium Outlets.

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers (NYSE: SKT) will see 19 stores closed out of its portfolio of 44 high end outlet shopping centers.

The shops typically varied about 3,000 square feet in size usually, which indicates about 105,000 square feet of newly uninhabited space for Simon and 57,000 square feet for Tanger.

That is a larger portion of space relatively for Tanger. Throughout 2017, Tanger regained 201,000 square feet within its portfolio. The 2017 amount is nearly double the quantity it took back a year earlier. Overall tenancy decreased from 98% in 2016 to 97% last year.

In speaking about his business’s 2017 results previously this year, Steven Tanger, CEO of Tanger Outlets, stated the REIT’s assistance for 2018 included half of the store closings that it received last year, which is back to our 2016 and 2015 levels of about 100,000 square feet to 150,000 square feet.

In his 2017 outcomes David Simon, chairman and CEO of Simon Property Group, estimated the REIT reclaimed about 1 million square feet last year compared to about 300,000 the year prior to. Nevertheless, Simon Residential Or Commercial Property Group does not break out its outlet numbers independently, so that overall includes its entire portfolio of 234 homes. Total tenancy decreased from 96.8% in 2016 to 95.6% last year.

Simon likewise said he expected space recapture this year to go back to 2016 levels.

Vacancy and lease signings have actually not been much of problem for outlet center operators, according to CoStar information.

Through the last 15 complete months, about 3.7 million square feet of readily available area was contributed to the CoStar database for outlet centers. Substantially however, more than 4 million square feet of available space was removed.

Vacancy in the sector is trending downward, and in truth, has actually been doing so for a couple of years– from 7.8% in 2013 to about 4.6% presently. Absorption has actually been exceeding even new shipments for the last 3 years.

In the past year, retailers signing brand-new leases in the 3,000-square-foot range have consisted of Columbia Sportswear, Go! Calendars & & Games, Mexican food dining establishment LaFrontera, Nike, OshKosh B’gosh, Rainbow Shops, and Zales Jewelers.

Tanger’s leasing renewal activity has actually held up pretty equally, nevertheless the pace of filling uninhabited area has actually decreased. Tanger signed about 440,000 square feet of brand-new leases in 2015, 384,000 in 2016, and 247,000 last year.

“2017 was a difficult year for merchants defined by numerous insolvency and brand-wide closing statements, including 22 of our tenants,” Tom McDonough, president and COO of Tanger, told analysts in a teleconference earlier this year. “Confronted with these market conditions, we chose to execute short-term renewals for about 15% of the renewal area that started throughout 2017 to offer the flexibility necessary to protect upside opportunity, while accommodating our tenant partners and keeping high tenancy.”

A great deal of the short-term leases [one year or less] were with distressed tenants hoping that service would rebound, the business mentioned.

“While these short-term renewals will continue to affect our 2018 outcomes, seller sentiment in the leasing environment have enhanced significantly considering that our last earnings call driven by to name a few things favorable vacation sales boosts, enhanced margins and the tailwind current tax reform is expected to offer the retailer community,” McDonough stated.

On that very same analyst call, Steven Tanger added that, “We have actually been through this before. This is not our first downturn in the 37 years we have remained in the business. “In times of the cycle when underperforming brands have shuttered shops, we have actually taken advantage of those chances to improve our occupant mix by filling the area with fresh brand-new brand names that our shoppers inform us they desire in our centers.

“Enhancing the tenant mix in this way has actually traditionally increased shopper traffic, driven demand from other brand-new occupants and increased future renewal spreads and total occupant sales efficiency,” he included.