Tag Archives: fraud

Las Vegas female claiming celebrity connections apprehended for fraud

Marlene Fitzgerald, 44, faces multiple felony charges for allegedly scamming victims (LVMPD).
 Marlene Fitzgerald, 44, faces several felony charges for allegedly scamming victims (LVMPD).

Marlene Fitzgerald, 44, deals with several felony charges for supposedly scamming victims( LVMPD). LAS VEGAS (FOX5)- A Las Vegas lady who claimed to have strong celeb

connections to singers, dj’s and boxers was jailed for defrauding multiple individuals. Marlene Fitzgerald, 44, deals with 5 felony counts for operating a fraud which includes theft totaling more than $3,500, according to a release from the office of Chief law officer Adam Laxalt. Fitzgerald supposedly ran numerous companies under the guise of entertainment booking agencies starting Dec. 2016 through July 2017.

The self-professed celebrity skill scheduling representative ran World Entertainment, LLC, Future Management and Overall Home Entertainment Artist Management which she utilized to assure victims performances from stars like Justin Bieber and The Chainsmokers. Fitzgerald accepted big deposits of cash in exchange for the alleged efficiencies.

On a separate celebration, Fitzgerald sealed a marketing deal including undefeated fighter Floyd Mayweather, Jr. She declared Mayweather would make personal appearances at occasions, logo positioning on his boxing gloves and unique sponsorship rights to Mayweather’s official after-party, inning accordance with the release. Victims of this alleged fraud jointly lost $230,000.

” Fraudsters will take advantage of their victims’ hopes and desires to perpetuate their fraud,” stated Laxalt. “My office will continue its work to deter embezzlement schemes by pursuing justice for victims of scams and theft.

The Attorney General’s Criminal Prosecution Unit will continue to examine and prosecute the alleged criminal offenses.

Fitzgerald’s arrest report is offered listed below.

Copyright 2018 KVVU( KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights scheduled.

Male, woman looked for in Las Vegas lottery ticket fraud

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class =” picture” src =” /wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Suspect_t318.jpg “alt=” Image “/ > CITY COPS This female is looked for in a lottery fraud. By< a rel=" author" href=" https://lasvegassun.com/staff/ricardo-torres/" title=" Ricardo Torres-Cortez staff page” > Ricardo Torres-Cortez( contact)

Tuesday, March 6, 2018|8:15 p.m.

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rip-off. A minimum of two victims last month were approached by a woman claiming to have a $1 million winning lotto ticket, which she needed assistance cashing.

By the end of the interaction, the female and a second suspect would flee, while the victims were bilked from their own money– with hopes of a windfall dashed.

To catch the wrongdoers, City Cops on Tuesday launched security images of a male and a lady, requesting for the public’s aid to determine them.

On at least two celebrations– Feb. 9 and Feb. 14– the female suspect approached Hispanic women and told them that she had a winning lotto ticket but couldn’t cash it due to the fact that she is undocumented, cops said. That’s when the male suspect would approach them, offering his support.

They would then enter into his automobile– a black four-door sedan– and a telephone call would be made to a third suspect who would allegedly validate the payouts, authorities said. The suspects would then drive the victim to obtain cash to spend for the services supplied by the caller.

Once they turned over the money, they would drive her to a home or organisation to “get the items that will complete the business deal while the suspects (left) the area,” police stated.

Anybody with information is asked to call authorities at 702-828-3483. To stay confidential, contact Criminal activity Stoppers at 702-385-5555 or crimestoppersofnv.com.

Nevada secretary of state declares voter fraud, blames DMV

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Mikayla Whitmore A citizen on election day strolls into the John C. Fremont Middle School ballot station in Las Vegas, Nev. on Nov. 8, 2016.

Sunday, April 16, 2017|7:15 a.m.

Nevada’s secretary of state has introduced a citizen scams examination, claiming the Department of Motor Automobiles may have unintentionally added a number of people to the voter rolls who were not citizens in the last governmental election.

Nevada Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske made the announcement in a letter Friday night to the state DMV director, Terri Albertson.

Albertson hit back Saturday, in an action letter back to Cegavske that read in part: “Your letter comes as a complete surprise as you and your workplace have reviewed, contributed to, and authorized the procedures you are revealing issues about.”

Cegavske, the state’s top election official, advised the DMV in her preliminary letter, claiming DMV employees provided and accepted citizen registration materials from clients seeking chauffeur’s licenses and identification cards, even if the clients provided a Green Card indicating they were not people.

Nevada law allows individuals to sign up to vote when they’re requesting motorist’s licenses and identification cards through the DMV. The DMV then forwards the voter registration details to the county elections department for processing.

Cegavske stated DMV workers being informed to accept voter registration info from all consumers is a misconception of the law. She purchased the DMV to stop the practice.

“Please take suitable corrective action, as we have reason to think that non-citizens have actually unlawfully signed up to vote in Nevada as a direct result of DMV’s practices,” Cegavske wrote.

Albertson reacted that her firm will consult lawyers on the matter however that the law requires the DMV to forward the registration information no matter how incomplete it may be, since it is the state’s election officials who ultimately examine voter eligibility. The DMV said its employees do, however, flag cases for additional evaluation when eligibility is questioned.

Cegavske also stated in a statement that her workplace “got proven proof of possible unlawful votes cast” but didn’t recognize which county or counties the proof originated from, and the number of votes it links. Cegavske said the examination is in the beginning stages but repeated that the office has validated individuals who were not residents enacted the election and that there were people who were ineligible– and didn’t vote– but still appeared on the citizen rolls.

“The integrity of the entire election process, from voter registration to the casting of tallies, is always my top issue,” Cegavske said.

A representative for Gov. Brian Sandoval couldn’t right away be reached for remark.

The secretary of state’s office is now seeking records from the DMV as part of the investigation. All 17 county clerks in Nevada were also notified with a copy of the DMV letter.

“The letter came as a complete surprise,” stated Joe Gloria, the Clark County Registrar of Voters.

Gloria stated Saturday he is not aware of any citizen fraud claims in Nevada’s most inhabited county, which includes Las Vegas. Nearly 1.2 million people in Nevada were signed up to vote in Clark County as of November 2016, which amounts to more than 70 percent of all citizens throughout the whole state, according to state records.

Gloria stated the secretary of state’s workplace because February has asked for and received details from Clark County however that there wasn’t a tip of this voter fraud examination.

“They have not supplied me with any information,” Gloria stated.

Cegavske is a Las Vegas Republican politician who spent 18 years in the Nevada Legislature before being elected secretary of state. She took office in 2015 as the state’s top election official and has promoted a law requiring picture identification to vote.

Last November, Cegavske reported that more than 1.1 million of the state’s nearly 1.5 million active registered voters cast tallies in the election. Nevada preferred Democrat Hillary Clinton, by 48 percent, to 46 percent for now President Donald Trump.

Guy convicted in Las Vegas home loan fraud case

Monday, Aug. 3, 2015|10:20 p.m.

. An Arizona guy whose earlier conviction was tossed was found guilty once more in a mortgage fraud plan that cost loan providers about $25 million, Nevada’s U.S. Lawyer Daniel G. Bodgen announced Monday.

Brett Depue, 42, of Gilbert, Ariz., was convicted Monday of conspiracy to dedicate mail, bank and wire scams, and 7 counts of wire scams.

In 2012, Depue was convicted on home mortgage scams charges and sentenced to 22 years in prison. But he appealed and the case was overturned by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which bought a brand-new trial. After Monday’s decision, Depue was remanded to custody and will be sentenced Nov. 9.

From 2005 to 2007, Depue ran a number of investment businesses in Las Vegas in which he conspired with others to defraud federally insured banks by recruiting straw buyers– generally pals or family members with decent credit history– to purchase houses they had no intention of living in, Bogden said. Depue would then manage the purchased houses, paying the straw purchasers nearly $5,000 to put the properties in their names. The buildings were bought for a price above the asking rate, and the difference was disbursed at near among Depue’s entities.

Using this plan, Depue and his co-conspirators obtained home loan for 110 houses in Las Vegas and Henderson. Your houses entered into foreclosure, and monetary institutions lost an approximated $24 million as an outcome of Depue’s scams, Bogden said.

10 co-conspirators were convicted for their roles in the plan.

‘Citizen of the year’ gets 14 years in California fraud case

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Joe Johnston/The Tribune (of San Luis Obispo) by means of AP

In this April 26, 2005, picture, former Atascadero Resident of the Year Kelly Gearhart poses in front of the Printery structure in Atascadero, Calif.

Thursday, July 2, 2015|9:30 p.m.

L.A– A previous California realty designer once honored as his city’s resident of the year was sentenced Thursday to the maximum 14 years in prison for bilking financiers who put millions of dollars into unsuccessful advancement jobs.

Federal Los Angeles Judge Otis Wright bied far a harsher sentence than the government had requested for Kelly Gearhart, 53, who pleaded guilty last year to wire fraud and money laundering. Gearhart, who now lives in northeastern Ohio, asked forgiveness through tears Thursday to the mainly senior people he cheated.

“I’m so sorry for all the heartache I caused,” Gearhart stated with a quavering voice. “I’ve lost everything I had. I have actually discovered product things have no value compared to the trust and friendship of those who believed in me. I valued that the most and now it’s gone.”

Gearhart’s lawyers had requested five years in jail, while federal district attorneys asked for 11.

As federal marshals handcuffed Gearhart, two investors smiled while a third wept.

Judge Otis Wright spoke sternly to Gearhart, stating he offered terrific weight to numerous senior investors “who had depended on this money to see them through their so-called golden years.”

“I would think of numerous of them have a variety of sleepless nights stressing over what their future holds in shop. And for exactly what?” Wright asked.

He said Gearhart has actually not done anything to reveal he was encouraged by anything aside from “large greed.”

Gearthart and his lawyer argued that he had not been using investor money on himself, however had actually started extensive work on the property jobs they had actually moneyed, when the housing market collapsed in 2007, rushed to use his own cash to try to get them completed.

“It’s type of like being an excellent swimmer and thinking you can outswim the biggest wave and recognizing halfway through it that you can’t,” Firdaus Dordi told the judge prior to sentencing. “Mr. Gearhart drowned.”

Dordi stated Gearhart was inspired by pride, conceit and determination not to see his company fail.

In his plea arrangement with district attorneys, Gearhart confessed offering the very same lots in a property job to multiple financiers, telling them that they would be repaid with interest. Gearhart likewise confessed using the exact same lots to obtain bank funding.

In all, Gearhart cheated more than 250 financiers from a minimum of $15 million, federal prosecutor Stephen Goorvitch said.

“His conduct was fairly brazen,” Goorvitch said. “Mr. Gearhart is simply stating whatever to the victims to get their money, making all these promises even though he’s losing cash on his tasks … He offers the lots over and over once again although the lots are being made use of to protect the victims’ investments. He lies to the bank and makes use of the money as a personal piggy bank.”

Both lawyers disagreed about the significance of Gearhart’s contributions to his community, Atascadero, on California’s central coastline. After working as a jail guard for 8 years, Gearhart developed a renovation and realty business from the ground up in 1992, finishing numerous successful houses and industrial equipments throughout the years, Dordi stated.

In 2006, Atascadero’s chamber of commerce called Gearhart citizen of the year, mentioning $500,000 in charitable donations.

Goorvitch said donations mean a lot less if any of the cash originated from investors.

“He was a relied on specialist in the environment, he was resident of the year,” Goorvitch stated. “To me those people ought to be held to a higher standard.”

An Oct. 20 hearing will certainly figure out just how much restitution Gearhart will be purchased to pay financiers, though prosecutors note that Gearhart might not have any cash left.

Kelly Stark, 66, said Gearhart’s sterling credibility swayed him to invest $175,000 in several projects; he lost it all.

After sentencing, Stark stated he felt relief and closure.

“He simply destroyed people,” Stark stated.

Monetta Grabowski, 69, spoke through tears previously today about how she lost $27,000 she invested hoping for a larger supplement to what she receives from retirement.

“We were not rich people,” Grabowski said. “The majority of us can never ever make the cash back.”

'' Resident of the year' ' gets 14 years in California fraud case

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Joe Johnston/The Tribune (of San Luis Obispo) via AP

In this April 26, 2005, photo, previous Atascadero Resident of the Year Kelly Gearhart postures in front of the Printery structure in Atascadero, Calif.

Thursday, July 2, 2015|9:30 p.m.

LOS ANGELES– A previous California realty designer as soon as honored as his city’s resident of the year was sentenced Thursday to the maximum 14 years in jail for bilking investors who put countless dollars into unsuccessful development projects.

Federal L.a Judge Otis Wright handed down a harsher sentence than the government had requested for Kelly Gearhart, 53, who pleaded guilty in 2014 to wire fraud and cash laundering. Gearhart, who now lives in northeastern Ohio, asked forgiveness through splits Thursday to the mainly elderly people he cheated.

“I’m so sorry for all the distress I triggered,” Gearhart stated with a quavering voice. “I’ve lost everything I had. I have actually found material things have no value compared with the trust and friendship of those who cared about me. I valued that the most and now it’s gone.”

Gearhart’s attorneys had requested five years in jail, while federal district attorneys asked for 11.

As federal marshals handcuffed Gearhart, two financiers smiled while a 3rd wept.

Judge Otis Wright spoke sternly to Gearhart, stating he provided terrific weight to numerous elderly investors “who had actually counted on this cash to see them through their so-called golden years.”

“I would think of many of them have a number of sleepless nights worrying about exactly what their future holds in shop. And for exactly what?” Wright asked.

He stated Gearhart has done nothing to reveal he was inspired by anything other than “large greed.”

Gearthart and his attorney argued that he had not been using investor money on himself, however had started comprehensive deal with the property tasks they had funded, when the real estate market collapsed in 2007, scrambled to utilize his own money to aim to get them completed.

“It’s sort of like being a great swimmer and thinking you can outswim the biggest wave and recognizing halfway through it that you cannot,” Firdaus Dordi informed the judge before sentencing. “Mr. Gearhart drowned.”

Dordi said Gearhart was inspired by pride, arrogance and determination not to see his business fail.

In his plea contract with prosecutors, Gearhart admitted selling the exact same lots in a property project to multiple investors, informing them that they would be repaid with interest. Gearhart also confessed making use of the exact same lots to get bank financing.

In all, Gearhart cheated more than 250 investors from a minimum of $15 million, federal district attorney Stephen Goorvitch said.

“His conduct was quite brazen,” Goorvitch stated. “Mr. Gearhart is simply saying whatever to the victims to obtain their cash, making all these guarantees even though he’s losing cash on his tasks … He sells the lots over and over once more even though the lots are being made use of to protect the victims’ efforts. He lies to the bank and makes use of the cash as an individual piggy bank.”

Both lawyers disagreed about the significance of Gearhart’s contributions to his environment, Atascadero, on California’s main coast. After working as a prison guard for eight years, Gearhart developed a remodel and real estate business from the ground up in 1992, completing hundreds of effective houses and industrial homes for many years, Dordi stated.

In 2006, Atascadero’s chamber of commerce named Gearhart resident of the year, mentioning $500,000 in charitable donations.

Goorvitch said donations mean a lot less if any of the cash came from financiers.

“He was a relied on expert in the neighborhood, he was citizen of the year,” Goorvitch said. “To me those people need to be held to a higher requirement.”

An Oct. 20 hearing will figure out just how much restitution Gearhart will certainly be bought to pay investors, though prosecutors keep in mind that Gearhart may not have any money left.

Kelly Stark, 66, said Gearhart’s sterling credibility swayed him to invest $175,000 in several tasks; he lost it all.

After sentencing, Stark stated he felt relief and closure.

“He just destroyed people,” Stark stated.

Monetta Grabowski, 69, spoke through splits earlier this week about how she lost $27,000 she invested wishing for a bigger supplement to exactly what she gets from retirement.

“We were not rich people,” Grabowski said. “The majority of us can never ever earn the money back.”

Guy serving time for securities fraud dies in prison

Wednesday, May 27, 2015|5:40 p.m.

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John Englehart

A 68-year-old prisoner passed away on Monday after several healthcare facility remains considering that his incarceration, according to jail authorities.

John Englehart passed away at the infirmary of the High Desert State Jail in Indian Springs. Considering that the start of his prison sentence, Englehart has had 5 hospital stays in Las Vegas for a total of 150 days, the Nevada Department of Corrections reported.

Englehart was serving a sentence of 22 to 96 months for a conviction of securities fraud. He had been jailed since May 20, 2014.

The Clark County Coroner’s Office reacted to the organization. Trigger and way of death are not yet offered.