Tag Archives: immigrant

5 immigrant females compete for Miss USA pageant title in Las Vegas

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John Locher/ AP In this May 11, 2017, image, Miss New Jersey U.S.A Chhavi Verg competes during an initial competition for Miss USA in Las Vegas. Very emigrated from India with her moms and dads. 5 of the entrants vying for the Miss USA title this year were born in other countries and now U.S. residents.

Saturday, May 13, 2017|2 a.m.

Five of the candidates contending for the Miss U.S.A title have a message to immigrant women and females watching the pageant this weekend: Set goals, strive and do not stay in the shadows.

The candidates know exactly what they are talking about as they were all born in other nations and immigrated to the United States at young ages as their families pursued their variations of the American Dream. The women are now all U.S. people.

“I desire them to see that anything is possible if you work hard,” stated Linnette De Los Santos, who immigrated with her household from the Dominican Republic when she was 5 years of ages. “As Miss U.S.A, I would love to be able to be that inspiration for our immigrant community. If I would have stopped following my dreams and striving to exactly what I wanted, I wouldn’t be sitting here as Miss Florida USA or in law school ready to end up being a migration lawyer.”

The competition airs Sunday from Las Vegas.

De Los Santos, Miss North Dakota Raquel Wellentin, Miss Hawaii Julie Kuo, Miss Connecticut Olga Litvinenko and Miss New Jersey Chhavi Verg spoke with The Associated Press about the opportunities and difficulties they have actually dealt with as immigrants.

Their remarks stand in stark contrast to the scandal that enveloped the pageant in 2015, when part owner and now President Donald Trump upset Hispanics when he made anti-immigrant remarks in announcing his bid for the White Home. Trump co-owned The Miss Universe Organization with NBCUniversal, however the network and the Spanish-language broadcaster Univision quickly cut ties with him, refusing to air the program. Trump sued both networks, eventually settling and selling off the entire pageant to talent management business WME/IMG.

Wellentin and her family left the Philippines over safety fears when she was 2 years old. Their very first taste of American life remained in the little community of Enderlin, North Dakota, where she and her siblings felt separated.

“No one wished to speak with me at all. I got home one day and I asked my dad ‘Why am I so various? Why isn’t anybody talking to me?'” Wellentin stated. “My dad informed me, ‘You know, you are not different. You are really distinct yourself. You need to be strong and actually accept this negativeness from other individuals and have it encourage you.’ I still keep that in my mind.”

Their scenario improved when they relocated to the bigger and more varied Fargo, North Dakota.

Wellentin, 24, who wishes to be an intermediate school teacher after she finishes a student-teaching requirement, said her experiences have taught her to not take no for a response.

“I wish to inform individuals that they need to ensure that they must not enable anyone to inform them that they cannot do something since just you can determine your future,” she stated.

Like countless other immigrants, Litvinenko moved to the United States with her family after her mother won the lotto for a green card. She was 3 when they transferred from Ukraine a few years after the Soviet Union collapsed.

The 27-year-old business owner ventured into pageants when she might no longer play basketball after injuring a foot in high school. She won Miss Connecticut Teenager on her first try but had to contend five times to reach the Miss U.S.A competition. Her perseverance, Litvinenko said, reveals that every effort counts.

“I wish to display that no matter who you are, no matter what your background is, your size or exactly what you have actually done in the past, through effort and discipline, through perseverance and decision, you truly can accomplish exactly what you put your heart to.”

Judge orders immigrant households launched from detention

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Eric Gay/ AP

In this July 7, 2015 file image, immigrants from El Salvador and Guatemala who got in the nation illegally board a bus after they were launched from a household detention center in San Antonio.

Friday, Aug. 21, 2015|11:57 p.m.

SAN ANTONIO– A federal judge in California has actually purchased the government to launch immigrant youngsters from household detention centers “without unneeded delay,” and with their mothers when possible, according to court papers.

In a filing late Friday, California U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee refused the government’s demand to reassess her ruling in late July that youngsters held in family detention centers after crossing the US-Mexico border unlawfully must be released quickly.

Calling the government’s latest arguments “repackaged and reheated,” she found the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in breach of a longstanding legal contract stating that immigrant kids can not be kept in unlicensed protected facilities, and gave company officials till Oct. 23 to comply.

Lawyers for Homeland Security had asked the judge to reassess her judgment, arguing that the firm was currently doing its finest to move households through detention rapidly which the centers had actually been converted into short-term processing centers.

Lawyers for the government are examining the order, said Nicole Navas, a spokeswoman for the Department of Justice, said Friday night.

This is the 2nd time Gee has actually ruled that detaining youngsters violates parts of a 1997 settlement from an earlier case. The settlement needs minors to be placed with a relative or in proper non-secure custody within five days. If there is a big influx of minors, times might be longer, but children still must be released as expeditiously as possible, under the regards to the law.

In her order, Gee countered that migration authorities “routinely failed to continue as expeditiously as possible to put accompanied minors, and in some circumstances, may still be unnecessarily dragging their feet now.”

Peter Schey, executive director of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, stated that the court’s order “will safeguard expatriate kids and their mothers from lengthy and entirely senseless detention.”

The government poured millions of dollars into 2 huge detention centers in Texas after 10s of thousands of immigrant households, mostly mothers with youngsters from Central America, crossed the Rio Grande into the U.S. last summer season. Many have petitioned for asylum after taking off gang and domestic violence back home.

The centers in Karnes City and Dilley, both south of San Antonio, just recently held more than 1,300 women and children combined. A 3rd, smaller center situated in Berks County, Pennsylvania, held about 70 individuals. All 3 are overseen by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, but the two centers in Texas are run by private prison operators.

In between September 2013 and October 2014, some 68,000 family members– mostly mothers with kids in tow– were captured at the border, according to U.S. Customs and Border Security. Between last October and July of this year, less than 30,000 have been nailed, a drop authorities say is a result of better enforcement in both the U.S. and Mexico.

In her order Friday, Gee challenged Homeland Security’s claim that considerably limiting or ending its household detention policy might spark another surge in illegal border crossings, calling this “speculative at finest” and “fear-mongering.”

Men attack immigrant, say '' Trump was right '.

Police said Steve Leader, 30, and Scott Leader, 38, said they attacked the man because he was homeless, Hispanic and an illegal immigrant. (Source: WHDH/Boston Police Department/CNN)Cops said Steve Leader, 30, and Scott Leader, 38, stated they attacked the man since he was homeless, Hispanic and a prohibited immigrant. (Source: WHDH/Boston Cops Department/CNN).

BOSTON (WHDH/CNN) – Two males are accused of beating a homeless guy with a metal pole and urinating on him, since they thought he was Hispanic and an unlawful immigrant.

Cops identified the 2 men as Scott Leader, 38, and his brother Steve Leader, 30.

Cops stated the men said “Donald Trump corrected” and “all these illegals need to be deported,” as they assaulted the man.

Police said the brothers were on their way home from a Red Sox video game when they came upon the victim sleeping near a train station.

Witnesses informed police the men beat the victim with a metal pole repeatedly and walked away chuckling.

Cops stated the older sibling later on informed them they attacked the guy since he was homeless, Hispanic and an unlawful immigrant.

The victim has legal documents.

Reporters asked Republican frontrunner Trump about the occurrence prior to a city center event in Derry, NH.

“I haven’t heard about that. I think that would be a shame, however I haven’t become aware of that. I will say individuals that are following me are really passionate. They enjoy this country, they desire this nation to be fantastic once more,” Trump said.

The whipping comes after Trump’s dissentious migration propositions have made worldwide headings in his White House campaign.

Trump has called for a wall to be developed along the united state border with Mexico.

He’s also required withdrawing citizenship of infants born in the U.S. to undocumented moms and dads, and deporting undocumented immigrants.

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