Tag Archives: incorrect

USPS owes $3.5 million in royalties for using the incorrect Statue of Liberty

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John Taylor/ Las Vegas Sun A Las Vegas version of the Statue of Liberty outside the New York-New York on the Strip.

Wednesday, July 4, 2018|2 a.m.

There’s a great chance you have actually seen the United States Postal Service Lady Liberty stamp. Maybe you believed this was a photo of the Statue of Liberty.

To see the complete story, click here.

Police: Cable television tech knocks on incorrect door, comes across slaying

Constructing a nuclear waste dump in Nevada is still the incorrect thing to do

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/ > John Locher/ AP Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill., stands near the north portal of Yucca Mountain throughout a congressional trip Thursday, April 9, 2015, about 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018|2 a.m.

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Throughout a current congressional conversation on the proposed Yucca Mountain hazardous waste repository, Rep. John Shimkus of Illinois said, “There’s always hope that the elected leaders will do the best thing.”

He’s ideal. There definitely is hope that Congress and the Trump administration will abandon the job, close the door on any future conversation of it and end this dreadful danger to Nevada forever and ever, amen, to borrow a line from a tune.

But alarmingly, that’s not exactly what Shimkus was getting at. To him, as well as the Trump administration and others in Congress, the ideal thing is to revive the task and begin delivering numerous lots of the most fatal radioactive waste across the country and into Nevada.

This month, during discussion on the House floor, Shimkus led an hour of speeches to lobby his associates in assistance for Yucca costs. Shimkus and his abettors are calling for $167.7 million to resume licensing of the task. If they get their method, the financing would be consisted of in the omnibus costs bill set to be released in coming weeks.

To their credit, numerous Nevada lawmakers reacted immediately with declarations that amounted to shouts of “Not now, not ever.”

” There are design flaws that the (Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s) own analysis shows will cause radioactive waste leaking into the water level and transportation strategies would ship more than 70,000 metric tons of hazardous waste by train and truck through 329 congressional districts for several years to come,” said Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev. “Now, some of my coworkers are pushing legislation that makes this bad task even worse by breaking the caps on the quantity of allowed waste to be kept, increasing the danger and invalidating any current studies.

” If the proponents of Yucca Mountain and their market donors are major about resolving the issue of hazardous waste storage, they would follow heaven Ribbon Commission suggestions and pass my consent-based bill instead of discarding hazardous waste into a state that does not produce it and does not desire it.”

As Titus concluded, “Nevada is not a wasteland.” Bravo to her and others who are trying to prevent the similarity Shimkus from turning the state into one.

The frustrating majority of Nevadans have actually been against the task because it surfaced in the mid-1980s. And with great factor– actually, lots of good factors.

As Titus explained, the transportation strategy calls for extremely radioactive waste to be transferred by truck and train throughout 22,000 of miles of trains and 7,000 miles of highways, raising the threat of a mishap or an attack that would expose Americans to lethal levels of radiation.

In Las Vegas, the transportation path would cut literally through the heart of the city, consisting of on train tracks that basically run together with Interstate 15. Thinking about that the product is so poisonous that there would be measurable levels of radiation within a half-mile each method of the tracks– from waste in extremely protected containers, no less– a mishap or attack might be devastating for the neighborhood.

Then there’s the proposed dump website itself, simply 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Due to its geology and its location in an area prone to seismic activity, there’s an inherent danger of radiation dripping into groundwater materials and into the environment through fissures. And how unsafe is this waste? Ten years after being gotten rid of from an atomic power plant, it would still produce a lethal dosage of radiation within 70 seconds to someone standing near it, unshielded. It will stay radioactive for countless years.

That stated, so as not to alarm anybody, it is necessary to explain that the proposed funding does not pose an imminent risk of the task being built. One, it’s a drop in the bucket for the funding had to build out the project– nearly $100 billion over the next 100 years. 2, it likely would not even cover the expenses of the licensing, which the Federal Government Responsibility Office has actually approximated at $330 million. The GAO also forecast that the process would take 5 years.

But the movement by Shimkus is certainly a hazard. For Nevadans, the Illinois Republican politician has actually long been a combination of Darth Vader and a Terminator robotic. He’s determined on turning Nevada into a disposing ground, and he simply keeps coming.

We ‘d motivate readers to let him understand precisely how Nevadans feel about the task, and to share their comments with the Sun for possible publication in an upcoming edition. Here’s how:

To contact Shimkus

– Washington, D.C., office: 202-225-5271

– Email webform: shimkus.house.gov/ contact

– Mail: 2217 Rayburn Home Office Complex, Washington, DC 20515

Editor’s note: Shimkus states on his congressional site that he is “not able” to respond to anybody outside of his district.

To share remarks with the Sun

– Email: [ e-mail secured]

– Mail: Ric Anderson, Las Vegas Sun, 2275 Corporate Circle, Henderson, NV 89074

NAR: If Your'' e Not Earning money in This Market You'' re Doing it Incorrect

A recent study by the National Association of Realtors of its industrial residential or commercial property members verified that the past a number of years have been great to be in realty.

NAR members took part in industrial property activity reported an 11% boost in their gross yearly earnings and a 19% increase in median sales volume in 2016 from the previous year.

NAR’s 2017 Industrial Member Profile, that includes brokers, sales representatives, appraisers and property managers, showed a mean gross yearly earnings of $120,800 last year, up from $108,800 in 2015. The group represents 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the realty market. Nevertheless, the group sent its commercial profile online survey to simply 64,147 members proclaiming an interest in CRE. The study carried out during June got 1,926 responses.

The association sees an uptick in members opting to specialize in business property at the very same time as business experts report enhancements in the market and their own company activity, said NAR President William E. Brown, an Alamo, CA-based member.

“A more powerful industrial market is a great indicator of a growing economy, so the outlook is positive for industrial members in the year ahead,” Brown said in a statement.

Amongst business NAR licensees, brokers and appraisers had the tendency to report the highest annual incomes while sales representatives reported the most affordable earnings.

Earnings amongst industrial members diverged commonly based upon experience. Members with less than 2 years in the industry reported a mean yearly income of $31,500 in 2016, below $43,400 in 2015, while those with more than 26 years of experience reported a median earnings of $162,200 in 2016, down from $165,400 in 2015.

Typical sales transaction volume amongst members who had at least one business transaction was $3.5 million, an increase from $2.93 million in 2015.

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The yearly study represents members of NAR who carry out a minimum of a part of their company in CRE sales, leasing, brokerage and advancement for land, workplace and industrial area, multifamily and retail buildings, along with commercial home management.

Industrial members completed a median average of eight sales deals in 2016, a small decline from the previous year. A quarter of commercial members reported having one to four deals, and 27% reported having more than 20 transactions.

The mean years of experience in property increased to 24 years in 2017, up from Twenty Years in 2016, as did the mean years of experience of members in commercial real estate – up from 15 years in 2016 to 19 years in 2017.

Among NAR’s industrial members, 47% are brokers and 30% are certified sales agents, constant with last year, while 17% have a broker-associate license. Appraisal license holders represented 5%, likewise roughly the same as in 2015.

In other NAR profile findings:

The average age of all commercial members is 60 and practically 75% are male, identical to last year’s results. Men reported being active in any property capacity for a typical average of 25 years and in CRE for of 20 years, the same as 2015. Females have actually been active in real estate for an average of 19 years, up from 14 years last year, and in the CRE market for 15 years, up from 11 years in 2015’s report.
Industrial members who handle properties normally managed 82,000 total square feet, representing 15 overall areas, up from 50,000 square feet and 17 spaces in 2015. Those who handle offices typically handled 25,000 square feet representing seven total workplace residential or commercial properties, up from 20,000 square feet of workplace and five residential or commercial properties in 2015.
About one-third of business members were associated with foreign deals in 2016, down 2% from 2015. Eighteen percent of commercial members reported an increase in cross-border transactions.

Police: Man threatens to pull gun over incorrect taco order

Tuesday, July 18, 2017|9:49 a.m.

LOS ALAMOS, N.M.– A New Mexico male is dealing with charges after cops say he threatened to pull a gun on a taco shop worker for giving him the incorrect order.

The Los Alamos Display reports that Lex Norman Deines was apprehended Sunday following a heated exchange with a staff member at Rigoberto’s Taco Store near among the nation’s best weapons laboratories.

Los Alamos Police Department Cpl. Jemuel Montoya states a staff member stated Deines assured to obtain a weapon from his vehicle over the apparently botched tacos. Witnesses said they heard the risk.

The 48-year-old Deines was booked at the Los Alamos County Detention Center and is dealing with disorderly conduct and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon charges.

It was not known if he had an attorney. The store is near Los Alamos laboratory.

Law enforcement agent shot after responding to incorrect house

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Ben Gray/ Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP

DeKalb County policeman work at the scene where an Atlanta-based officer was shot Monday evening, Aug. 31, 2015, 5 miles from Atlanta.

Monday, Aug. 31, 2015|9 p.m.

ATLANTA– A policeman was shot and seriously wounded Monday when he reacted to a call of a suspicious person and appeared at the wrong home, authorities said.

The homeowner was likewise shot in the leg and his pet was killed in exactly what DeKalb County cops Chief Cedric Alexander is calling a complicated shooting. Officers fired their weapons, the chief said, however it’s unclear if the house owner had a weapon.

Alexander said his department would normally manage the investigation because it did not involve a death, but because of the unusual circumstance, he asked the Georgia Bureau of Investigation to check out it.

“We did respond to the incorrect residence tonight and after that these other circumstances unfolded,” he stated.

Alexander stated the scenario happened like this: A community local called 911 at 7:34 p.m. to report a suspicious person and explained a the home of the dispatcher. Three officers reacted to a residence that fit the description the caller provided 911. The officers went to the back of the house and discovered that a screen door and a rear door were unlocked.

“That in and of itself would probably suggest to anybody that it is possible that there could be intruders within, but it ended up not to be the case,” Alexander stated. “Somewhere at the rear of that home, some things occurred that have yet to be identified.”

The officers had actually just entered the home when the gunfire emerged.

“There was gunfire, I simply can not inform you who fired and who did not,” he stated.

An officer was shot in the leg and lost a great deal of blood. He was hurried to the health center and was undergoing surgical treatment. The homeowner was also taken to the health center.

The house owner’s sweetheart was at the home at the time of the shooting and called 911.

Derek Perez informed The Associated Press that he reported the suspicious individual. He stated he was walking his canine when he saw a male knock on a next-door neighbor’s door then just stand in the yard. He said he then heard a loud sound, a pet dog barking and didn’t see the man anymore. There had actually been burglaries in the area just recently, so he called 911, he stated.

Simply as he was about to go into his house, he heard the gunshots, but they didn’t come from your home where he had reported the suspicious person.

Police were still investigating whether there was a burglary at the house where the suspicious individual was found.

All three officers have actually been placed on management leave.

The shooting took place in a community about 5 miles from downtown Atlanta.

Judge: Incorrect $50,000 restitution in hepatitis case will certainly stand

Friday, July 24, 2015|3:11 p.m.

. A federal judge says error or not a center chief connected to the biggest medical office hepatitis C break out in Nevada history will pay $50,000 in restitution to overbilled insurers and business, not $2.2 million district attorneys looked for.

District Judge Larry Hicks ruled Wednesday that Tonya Rushing’s sentence would stand. Rushing pleaded guilty in 2014 to conspiracy to dedicate healthcare fraud.

U.S. Lawyer Daniel Bogden said the $50,000 was intended to be credited toward a last amount yet to be determined. He says in a filing that divvying out the $50,000 to 594 insurance companies and companies owed money would provide just 169 of them more than $10 each.

Hicks states prosecutors didn’t look for the repair within 14 days and had accepted the earlier language setting the restitution at $50,000.