Tag Archives: jerusalem

Trump forges ahead on Jerusalem-as-capital regardless of cautions

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Oded Balilty/ AP In this July 25, 2017, file photo, Jerusalem’s Old City is seen trough a door with the shape of star of David.

Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017|2:01 p.m.

WASHINGTON– President Donald Trump advanced Tuesday with strategies to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital regardless of intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would overthrow decades of U.S. policy and risk possibly violent demonstrations.

Trump likewise told the leaders of the Palestinian Authority and Jordan in phone calls that he plans to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. It stays unclear, nevertheless, when he may take that physical step, which is required by U.S. law however has been waived on national security premises for more than two decades.

Trump is to publicly attend to the concern of Jerusalem on Wednesday.

U.S. officials knowledgeable about his preparation said he would state Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, a rhetorical volley that might have its own unsafe repercussions. The United States has never ever endorsed the Jewish state’s claim of sovereignty over any part of Jerusalem and has actually insisted its status be fixed through Israeli-Palestinian negotiation.

The mere consideration of Trump changing the status quo stimulated a restored U.S. security warning on Tuesday. America’s consulate in Jerusalem bought U.S. workers and their families to prevent visiting Jerusalem’s Old City or the West Bank, and advised American residents in basic to prevent places with increased police or military presence.

Trump, as a governmental prospect, consistently guaranteed to move the United States embassy. However, U.S. leaders have consistently and unceremoniously postponed such a move given that President Costs Clinton signed a law in 1995 specifying that the United States need to transfer its diplomatic presence to Jerusalem unless the commander in chief issues a waiver on nationwide security grounds.

Trump is most likely to do the same, U.S. authorities said, though less silently. That’s why he plans to pair the waiver with the statement of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, according to the authorities who weren’t licensed to speak publicly on the matter and required anonymity. Key nationwide security consultants including Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis have actually urged cautioned, according to the officials, who stated Trump has been receptive to some of their concerns.

The concerns are genuine: Trump’s acknowledgment of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital could be considered as America discarding its longstanding neutrality and siding with Israel at a time that the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, has been attempting to midwife a brand-new peace process into existence. Trump, too, has mentioned his desire for a “deal of the century” that would end Israeli-Palestinian dispute.

U.S. authorities, along with an outside adviser to the administration, stated they expected a broad statement from Trump about Jerusalem’s status as the “capital of Israel.” The president isn’t really planning to utilize the expression “undivided capital,” according to the authorities. Such terms is preferred by Israeli officials including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and would suggest Israel’s sovereignty over east Jerusalem, which the Palestinians seek for their own future capital.

Jerusalem consists of the holiest ground in Judaism. But it’s also home to Islam’s third-holiest shrine and major Christian sites, and forms the combustible center of the Israeli-Arab conflict. Any perceived harm to Muslim claims to the city has actually activated unpredictable demonstrations in the past, both in the Holy Land and across the Muslim world.

Within the Trump administration, officials on Tuesday were still disputing the particulars of the president’s anticipated speech as they fielded a flood of warnings from allied governments.

Any U.S. declaration on Jerusalem’s status, ahead of a peace deal, “would damage peace settlement process and escalate tension in the region,” Saudi Arabia’s King Salman told Trump Tuesday, according to a Saudi readout of their telephone conversation. Stating Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, the king stated, “would constitute an ostentatious justification to all Muslims, all over the world.”

In his calls to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Jordan’s King Abdullah II, Trump provided what seemed similar messages of intent. Both leaders alerted Trump that moving the embassy would threaten Mideast peace efforts and security and stability in the Middle East and the world, inning accordance with declarations from their workplaces. The declarations didn’t speak to Trump’s prepare for recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Ahmed Aboul-Gheit, the head of the Arab League, prompted the U.S. to reassess any recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, caution of “consequences.” Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan informed his Parliament such acknowledgment was a “red line” which Turkey could respond by cutting diplomatic ties with Israel.

French President Emmanuel Macron said he advised Trump in a telephone call Monday that Jerusalem should be determined through settlements on establishing an independent Palestine together with Israel. Meeting U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Brussels, EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said actions undermining peace efforts “must be definitely avoided.”

Despite Trump’s remarks to world leaders, U.S. officials stated an embassy announcement wasn’t seen as imminent. Rather, they said Trump on Wednesday would likely sign a waiver pressing off any announcement of moving the embassy to Jerusalem for another six months.

Trump also will give broad latitude to his ambassador in Israel, David Friedman, to make a decision on when a Jerusalem embassy would be appropriate, according to the officials. Friedman has spoken in favor of the move.

As worldwide pressure has installed, authorities have actually stated Trump could aim to restrict the impact of anything he says on Jerusalem. Amongst the ideas under factor to consider: A Trump nod to Palestinian “goals” for a capital in east Jerusalem or his endorsement of a two-state solution to the conflict, something he hasn’t clearly offered. The authorities stated it’s unclear if any of that may be included.

Majdi Khaldi, Abbas’ diplomatic consultant, stated Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital could end Washington’s role as mediator.

“This would indicate they chose, by themselves, to distance themselves from efforts to make peace,” Khaldi informed The Associated Press in perhaps the most greatly worded response by a Palestinian official. He stated such recognition would lead the Palestinians to eliminate contacts with the United States.

Changing Jerusalem’s status would be “a stab in the back,” Husam Zomlot, the Palestinians’ chief delegate to Washington, told the AP.

Palestinian political factions led by Abbas’ Fatah movement required everyday protest marches this week, starting Wednesday. East Jerusalem, now home to more than 300,000 Palestinians, was recorded by Israel in 1967 then annexed in a relocation most of the global neighborhood has not acknowledged.

Federman reported from Jerusalem. Associated Press authors Karin Laub in Amman, Jordan; Josh Lederman in Brussels; Matthew Pennington in Washington; Elaine Ganley in Paris; Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey, and Aya Batrawy in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, added to this report.

Israel police clash with Palestinians at Jerusalem holy site

Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015|7:33 a.m.

JERUSALEM (AP)– Israeli authorities briefly clashed with Palestinian protesters at Jerusalem’s the majority of sensitive holy site early Sunday, raising stress in the holy city ahead of the Jewish New Year.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said forces moved into the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound at around 7 a.m. Sunday after cops received reports that protesters were planning to disrupt visits to the area by Jewish worshippers and tourists.

He said the protesters barricaded themselves inside the mosque and threw rocks and firecrackers at cops. He said police did not go into the mosque, but removed barriers around the building. Suspected pipe bombs were discovered at the entrance to the mosque, cops spokeswoman Luba Samri said.

Cops released video showing lit firecrackers and other objects tossed by Palestinians inside the mosque at the officers on the outside with some firecrackers blowing up within the holy website.

There were no reports of arrests or injuries. The site was closed for 3 hours during the standoff but then re-opened for visitors.

The hilltop compound is revered by Jews as the Temple Mount, website of the two scriptural Jewish temples. Muslims call the website the Noble Sanctuary and revere it as the area where the Prophet Muhammad ascended to heaven.

The website is a regular flashpoint of violence. Because Israel recorded east Jerusalem from Jordan in 1967, Jewish worshippers have been permitted to go to– but not hope– at the site. The area is administered by Muslim authorities and is under Jordanian custody. Muslim authorities see the presence of Jewish worshippers and Israeli cops as a provocation and accuse Jewish extremists of plotting to take over the website.

Abdelazem Salhab, an official with the Waqf, the Islamic body that runs the site, implicated authorities of triggering “large damage” inside the mosque. “They crashed numerous windows and harmed many carpets,” he said.

“Jews have no rights in the mosque and its yard,” he said. “The role of Israeli authorities as the inhabiting power is safeguarding this website from non-Muslims who prepare to take it over, not helping them.”

Police stated they did not get in the site, and that any damage was caused by fireworks fired up by Palestinian protesters inside.

Video later launched by cops showed Ahmed Tibi, an Arab legislator in Israel’s parliament, chewing out officers and calling their presence “a provocation.”

Israeli Head of state Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel is committed to protecting the compound’s status, but would not endure violence at the holy site.

“It is our duty and our right to act against law breakers to allow flexibility of worship at this holy site. We will act assertively versus those throwing rocks, firebombs, pipe bombs or other device,” he stated.

In bordering Jordan, federal government representative Mohammad Momani gotten in touch with Israel to end its “provocative acts.”