Tag Archives: national

UNLV Trainee Veteran Gets National Acknowledgment

If Alexandria Sawin’s 4-year-old daughter Isabelle has dreams of becoming a musician-astronaut, she’ll support and motivate her.

It’s the leading reason she decided to end up being the first female president of the UNLV Rebel Vets Organization in 2018.

” I wished to reveal her that she can do anything,” Sawin stated. “I like having the ability to show females that we can do anything.”

Sawin’s title was offered a boost on Jan. 5 when the Student Veterans of America (SVA) called her the Trainee Veteran of the Year for 2018, a nationwide recognition. She was picked among a list of 10 finalists.

” My brain did not process that they had actually called my name,” Sawin said. “I feared for 2 seconds. You never think you’re going to get an award when you’re up versus all of these incredible trainees.”

But Sawin’s contributions to UNLV and veterans throughout 2018 made her the best choice for the award.

” Alexandria Sawin is a fitting example of the quality of the trainee veterans who participate in UNLV,” said Ross Bryant, director of the Military and Veteran Solutions Center at UNLV. “This award acknowledges her strong work principles, her record of academic quality, her commitment to student veterans, and her ability to lead her Rebel Veterinarian group. We’re proud that she was chosen for this honor.”

Sawin, who began acting as president of Rebel Vets in January 2018, said arranging a ruck march across Nevada for the 6,950 service members killed in action given that 9/11 was her most substantial contribution. She also participated in policy discussions and advocated for numerous veteran-focused costs, consisting of the Hire Trainee Veterans Act.

She stated the honor she got from SVA is one to be shared with her fellow Rebel Vets. SVA, which has more than 1,500 chapters at colleges across the U.S. and four countries overseas, likewise recognized the Rebel Vets as a finalist for Chapter of the Year.

” I like that the award has permitted the Rebels Vets to get out there and for everybody to see all of the amazing things that we do,” Sawin said. “It actually shows all of the effort that my organization puts in. It was certainly a group effort.”

Prior to going to UNLV, Sawin served on active duty in the U.S. Flying force for seven years. In 2016, she transitioned into the Air Force Reserve at Nellis Air Force Base.

About UNLV Military and Veteran Solutions Center

UNLV has more than 1,850 active-duty, reserve or veteran military trainees on school. Most have gotten tuition advantages through the Post 9/11 G.I. Expense. UNLV is recognized by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs as a VetSuccess school and designated a military friendly school by G.I. Jobs Magazine. UNLV has also re-engaged with Nellis Flying force Base and offers on-base recommending and courses for active-duty military. UNLV also recently introduced a Rebel Veterans Alumni Club, which uses present and previous student veterans an opportunity to network with one another and learn about opportunities available to veterans in Southern Nevada.

Find out more at unlv.edu/veterans.

Quick Take: What the 4th National Environment Assessment Way for Nevada and the West

The most recent national climate assessment records the future effects of a warming world more completely than reports that have come before it, UNLV geology professor Matt Lachniet states.

Lachniet studies environment history that extends thousands of years into the past, and what he’s learned from his research can provide us an idea of what Nevada is capable of sustaining today, and into the future.

As he puts it, Nevada is moving in only one instructions: to a location that will just become hotter and drier.

“There’s nothing that’s going to save us from that,” he said.

However if some modifications are made, we can minimize the degree to which that takes place, and likewise stem the loss of our supply of water. We overtook Lachniet to comprehend what Nevada, and the West, can learn from the 4th National Environment Evaluation.

How much will temperature levels increase and what does it indicate for Las Vegans? We’ll be experiencing more very hot days. We’re looking at potentially 10 to 30 more days each year that exceed 90 degrees. It’s currently beginning now, and it’s going to end up being a lot more common in the next couple of years.

Definitely it’s going to be a lot hotter so we’ll be spending more energy in the summer season for our cooling. It’s going to wind up costing us more. But I think we’ll have the ability to adapt in Las Vegas to the increased heat. We’ll simply have to spend more time in doors during the summer.

A significant takeaway: We’re actually looking at minimized circulation of water in the Colorado River– an area that sustains 55 million people. Warmer temperatures are causing less of the snowpack from the Rocky Mountains to make it into the river, and we have less water offered.

There’s 2 reasons the water levels in Lake Mead are receding: we’re utilizing more than nature is giving us, and nature is providing us less. And the decrease in water circulation has a lot to do with increasing temperatures. There’s less snowfall in the winter due to the fact that temperatures are greater. When the Spring season comes, there’s less melting snow that goes into the river.

What does a decreasing supply of water suggest for the West? In the Colorado River Basin, it has to do with selecting how we reallocate water throughout scarcities. We need to share between Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. There’s been a great deal of talks already in between the states about how to handle drought contingency strategies, and they’re working on some plans today.

The fundamental concept is that if water levels in Lake Mead go listed below the important low-level, the different parties are going to need to reduce their water use.

We can slow that reduction, and even stop it if we have climate policies that decarbonize. But if we keep going on the exact same trajectory, there will not suffice water to sustain the economy as we understand it in the southwest.

Are there other essential takeaways for the West? Yes. As the environment heats up here, we’re going to have more wildfires. Soil can hold onto less water when it’s hot. And more wildfires will adversely affect air quality in Nevada.

And while water level increase doesn’t directly effect Nevada as the state is not beside an ocean, we’ll experience secondary effects. Parts of the Bay Area, San Diego and Los Angeles will be underwater 100 years from now because of sea level rise. And those people need to go someplace. It’s likely that some of those people will wind up in Las Vegas if they can hammer out the traffic on the I-15.

Is there a silver lining? The good news is that Nevada is already doing a great job of conserving water. We’ve been reducing our per capita usage while also growing our economy.

The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s rebate program– which pays house owners to secure their lawn and other high water-use landscaping– is one factor for this. Outdoors irrigation is water that we use and lose. Turf draws up the water and it goes back into the environment.

Presently, we’re staying below our water limitation from the Colorado River Basin.

About Lachniet: Lachniet is a climate scientist who concentrates on paleoclimatology, which is the research study of environment variations over the last few hundred thousand years. His main focus is speleoclimatology– a field that concentrates on making use of cave deposits to understand previous environment variations. Most just recently he’s been diving in caves in Central America to bring greater understanding to environment history as it relates to the Maya civilization.

Quick Take: What the 4th National Environment Evaluation suggests for Nevada and the West

The most recent national environment evaluation records the future effects of a warming planet better than reports that have come before it, UNLV geology teacher Matt Lachniet states.

Lachniet research studies environment history that extends thousands of years into the past, and what he’s gained from his research study can offer us a concept of what Nevada is capable of sustaining today, and into the future.

As he puts it, Nevada is moving in just one instructions: to a place that will just become hotter and drier.

“There’s absolutely nothing that’s going to conserve us from that,” he stated.

But if some modifications are made, we can reduce the degree to which that occurs, and likewise stem the loss of our water system. We caught up with Lachniet to understand what Nevada, and the West, can learn from the Fourth National Environment Assessment.

How much will temperature levels increase and what does it suggest for Las Vegans? We’ll be experiencing more very hot days. We’re taking a look at potentially 10 to 30 more days each year that surpass 90 degrees. It’s already beginning now, and it’s going to become even more common in the next number of years.

Definitely it’s going to be a lot hotter so we’ll be spending more energy in the summertime for our a/c. It’s going to wind up costing us more. But I believe we’ll be able to adapt in Las Vegas to the increased heat. We’ll simply need to invest more time in doors throughout the summer season.

A major takeaway: We’re actually looking at lowered circulation of water in the Colorado River– an area that sustains 55 million individuals. Warmer temperatures are causing less of the snowpack from the Rocky Mountains to make it into the river, and we have less water readily available.

There’s 2 reasons why the water levels in Lake Mead are receding: we’re utilizing more than nature is offering us, and nature is giving us less. And the reduction in water flow has a lot to do with increasing temperatures. There’s less snowfall in the winter since temperatures are higher. When the Spring season comes, there’s less melting snow that enters into the river.

What does a diminishing water system mean for the West? In the Colorado River Basin, it’s about selecting how we reallocate water during lacks. We need to share between Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. There’s been a lot of talks already between the states about how to handle dry spell contingency plans, and they’re dealing with some plans today.

The basic idea is that if water levels in Lake Mead go below the crucial low-level, the various celebrations are going to have to minimize their water use.

We can slow that reduction, or even stop it if we have environment policies that decarbonize. But if we keep going on the very same trajectory, there will not suffice water to sustain the economy as we know it in the southwest.

Exist other essential takeaways for the West? Yes. As the climate heats up here, we’re going to have more wildfires. Soil can hold onto less water when it’s hot. And more wildfires will adversely affect air quality in Nevada.

And while water level increase does not directly impact Nevada as the state is not next to an ocean, we’ll experience secondary impacts. Parts of the Bay Location, San Diego and Los Angeles will be undersea 100 years from now due to the fact that of water level increase. And those individuals need to go someplace. It’s likely that a few of those people will end up in Las Vegas if they can fight through the traffic on the I-15.

Is there a silver lining? The good news is that Nevada is already doing an excellent job of saving water. We’ve been decreasing our per capita use while likewise growing our economy.

The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s rebate program– which pays homeowners to get their yard and other high water-use landscaping– is one reason for this. Outdoors irrigation is water that we use and lose. Turf draws up the water and it returns into the atmosphere.

Presently, we’re remaining below our water limitation from the Colorado River Basin.

About Lachniet: Lachniet is an environment researcher who focuses on paleoclimatology, which is the study of environment variations over the last couple of hundred thousand years. His primary focus is speleoclimatology– a field that concentrates on using cavern deposits to comprehend previous environment variations. Most recently he’s been diving in caves in Central America to bring greater understanding to environment history as it connects to the Maya civilization.

Dallas Area Stakes Claim as National Data Center With Expansion of $1 Billion Job

Digital Real estate Trust is expanding a $1 billion task as innovation property advancement surges in the Dallas location. Credit: City of Garland, Texas.The Dallas

area is sealing its status as a national center for information centers with the $400 million growth of a $1 billion strategy by designer Digital Realty Trust for a campus in the suburb of Garland, the latest job to benefit from the region’s significant corporate operations, data-carrying networks and the state’s decentralized energy grid.

A year after Garland authorities unveiled plans for San Francisco-based Digital Realty Trust to construct the 47.5-acre school near Campbell Road and the President George Bush Turnpike, the city approved plans for the information center developer to expand the project by $400 countless investment.

The 16-acre growth brings the total task size to 64 acres, which is anticipated to be totally established over coming decades. Upon completion, the information center will have the ability to run with more than 160 megawatts of crucial IT load, making it among the greatest data center tasks in North Texas.

“This was all about economies of scale,” David Gwin, the city’s director of economic development, said in an interview. “This was about schedule and the timing being right. It made sense to add an additional 16 acres to the deal.”

The city of Garland likewise enticed Digital Realty Trust with a 40 percent tax reduction for seven years for each phase of the advancement. With the expansion of the job, Digital Real estate’s three-phase advancement broadened to 5 stages. Each phase will get the tax break, Gwin stated, in a period that might stretch 30 years or start as stages get underway– depending upon Digital Realty’s ambitions.

“The very first phase is slated to come online in 2022,” he included. “The remainder of the rewards depend upon when they choose to obtain started on other phases.”

Dallas-Fort Worth is a leading U.S. information center market, with major jobs underway in the region including Google’s proposed $500 million data center in Midlothian, Facebook’s 150-acre, $1 billion data center in Fort Worth’s AllianceTexas master-planned advancement, and CyrusOne’s proposed 60-acre, 100-megawatt data center campus in Allen.

It’s an enticing place for data centers due to the fact that of the relative functional price, proximity to tech talent and main place in the United States. In addition, North Texas has an established fiber network that provides users connectivity.

In Garland’s case, the city provided RagingWire Data Centers, a data center developer building surrounding to the Digital Realty job, a $1.5 million tax reward to help generate a minimum of four significant fiber network companies to the instant vicinity. That helped develop a hotbed of data center activity in the market.

With Garland’s proposed Digital Realty school, the city is preparing to include about 110 acres of information center area. Other jobs include the surrounding RagingWire Data Centers campus and a Stream Data Centers proposed job. However, Gwin stated, these won’t be the last of the information center tasks in Garland.

“We feel like there’s more boiling down the pike,” he included, declining to share details up until those offers end up being settled.

The initial stage of Digital Real estate’s five-phase, 1.4 million-square-foot information center campus is arranged to end up being operational by late 2021. Each phase will total about 280,000 square feet of data area with the capability to operate 32 megawatts of important IT load.

A megawatt, which is equal to 1,000 kilowatts, can provide power to about 650 typical homes. Nevertheless, that ability to power houses will probably vary based upon the electrical need throughout a specific season, time of day and other factors. The city of Garland has practically 235,000 locals and belongs to the larger North Texas area, which has 6.8 million people.

The Digital Realty campus mirrors similar strategies by RagingWire Data Centers, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based NTT Communications, which provided its first phase of space totaling 232,000 square feet with 16 megawatts of vital IT load in 2017. Upon completion, the RagingWire information center is expected to total 1 million square feet of area with 80 megawatts of power.

The run on data center area is tied, in part, to Garland Power and Light, the city-owned electrical utility that has the ability to provide trusted electricity to data center users at competitive rates, Gwin said. Those competitive rates, in addition to proximity in the region and infrastructure, aid strengthen the data center tasks, he said.

A number of popular tracks in Zion National Park closed indefinitely after storms

(Courtesy)
( Courtesy) (Courtesy).

ZION NATIONAL FOREST, UT( FOX5) -. Several popular trails were closed in Zion National Park after storms in the area damages treking routes last week.

The routes will remain closed till crew and engineers can repair and re-route them, inning accordance with the release. It was not known for how long repairs will take.

The closed trails, identified to be risky, include:

Angels LandingKayentaUpper Emerald PoolsWest Rim from the Grotto Trailhead to Cabin Springand the back of Lower Emerald Pools Trail

Officials stated the damage was substantial in three areas: Refrigerator Canyon on the West Rim Trail, Kayenta Path and the back of Lower Emerald Pools Trail. Fridge Canyon is an area visitors should go through on their method to or from Angels Landing.

In Fridge Canyon, an area of retaining wall stopped working, triggering an 18 foot space in the trail that is over 5 feet deep. As a result, the West Rim Trail in between Cabin Spring (near wilderness campsite # 1) and the Grotto Trailhead in Zion Canyon is closed. This consists of Zion’s popular Angel’s Landing Trail. Visitors are encouraged to use Observation Point Trail or Covert Canyon Trail as options. The West Rim camping sites are open and accessible from the Lava Point Trailhead.
On Lower Emerald Pools Path, a 20 foot by 10 foot stone that was supporting part of the trail fell, leaving a deep space in the path. 2 big keeping walls underlying and supporting the trail likewise failed. The Lower Emerald Pools waterfall is still visible from the Lower Emerald Pools Trail, however visitors can not stroll behind the waterfall. Riverside Walk or the Pa’ rus Path are suggested as options.
On the Kayenta Trail, numerous large stones fell and totally crushed roughly 50 feet of trail, rendering it unpassable at this time. Upper Emerald Pools Path is likewise closed due to the fact that there is no other way to access the path without treking either Lower Emerald Pools Path or the Kayenta Path which are harmed and closed. Watchman Path is recommended as an option for Upper Emerald Pools Trail and Kayenta Trail.

” While we are examining possible temporary re-routes to open tracks, cliffs and high surface limitation those opportunities,” stated Superintendent Jeff Bradybaugh. “Comprehensive repair will be required prior to some routes can be opened. Offered the engineering and comprehensive repairs needed, it is too soon to estimate when each closed path might once again be open to visitor use.”

Stay with FOX5 for updates.

Copyright 2018 KVVU (KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights booked.

Atlanta Makes Case as a National Business Innovation Center

Mercedes-Benz Ends Up Being the most recent Global Company to Establish Key Research Hub in City

Georgia Tech’s Innovation Square campus in Midtown Atlanta is the center of innovation in Atlanta and Georgia. Tech Square, which opened in 2003, has played a critcal function in Atlanta’s introduction as a nationwide development hub that has drawn in nearly 20 worldwide development centers.Photo courtesy
of Georgia Tech

Georgia Gov. Nathan Offer and Mercedes-Benz International’s chief executive are making the news authorities on Monday: The automaker plans to open its fourth global development center– and its very first in the United States– in Atlanta’s Buckhead district.

With the opening of its Lab1886 at shared office company WeWork’s newest Buckhead location at the Terminus mixed-use development, Mercedes-Benz would end up being the latest international business to set up a development center in Atlanta, the center of business in the southeast. The high-end automaker, which opened its brand-new U.S. head office just north of the city earlier this year, joins telecoms business AT&T, electronic devices maker Panasonic, industrial producers Siemens and Emerson, health insurer Anthem, planemaker Boeing, Delta Air Lines, retailer House Depot, self-service kiosk service provider NCR Corp. and others in Atlanta’s development cluster.

As a result, Atlanta is getting noticed nationally as a major development hub, something that wasn’t occurring a decade ago, said Brian McGowan, who worked as primary operating officer for the U.S. Economic Advancement Administration under President Barack Obama.

“Each brand-new announcement like Mercedes-Benz is shining a big, brilliant light on the city and connecting the words Atlanta and development together,” McGowan informed CoStar News. “It makes individuals think in a different way about Atlanta. 8 years ago, in the Obama administration, we weren’t thinking of Atlanta. However I ensure you that they are now.”

Atlanta is punching above its weight class in the fight to land innovation and research centers. Last year, trade publication Development Leader ranked Atlanta No. 6 on its list of leading cities for innovation, while the city ranks as the ninth-largest metropolitan area when it pertains to population and 10th-largest based upon the area’s gdp.

In the broad scheme, innovation centers are locations where business owners and researchers can interact to brainstorm and produce developments that cause brand-new items and software. They generally are located at or near a research university that itself has a development department or initiative. They are the most recent adaptation of university research parks.

At the business level, development centers are laboratories, typically located away from the stiff culture of corporate headquarters, where scientists and leading method individuals gather to progress concepts in the testing stages. Companies such as Mercedes-Benz also use innovation centers as a method to display their newest products and innovations before they reach the customer or business-to-business market.

When selecting sites for innovation centers, companies normally look for locations close to research study institutions in cities with an existing innovation cluster and with growing populations and a pool of tech skill. Cost of living and an area’s general service climate are vital, too. In 2017, Site Selection, a trade publication, ranked Georgia as the state with the very best company climate for the 5th successive year.

“Atlanta’s much lower expenses of living compared to other cities in America assists,” stated McGowan, who also headed financial development efforts for California under previous Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and for the city of Atlanta as president of Invest Atlanta. During his tenure at Invest Atlanta, McGowan led efforts to produce 20,000 new jobs that had a financial effect of practically $20 billion. A number of the tasks were created at brand-new development centers.

The large numbers of Fortune 500 companies with head office in urban Atlanta likewise helps bring in worldwide innovation centers, McGowan stated, since it imparts confidence in business with no presence in the city to purchase Atlanta. Plus, several of the companies consisting of NCR, Delta and House Depot established their development centers in their home town.

Also, inning accordance with a recent report from property providers Jones Lang LaSalle, companies want to locate innovation workplaces and centers in cities with accelerated technology task growth and a concentration of state-of-the-art services. They also want to see that venture capital backs local start-ups.

Atlanta fits the costs, according to experts. It starts with the Georgia Institute of Innovation, or Georgia Tech. The research institution has helped propel the city into the upper echelon of innovation. Georgia Tech runs its own incubator, the Advanced Innovation Advancement Center, called ATDC.

Founded in 1980, Georgia Tech’s ATDC offers startup business access to the school’s resources including its research study facilities, copyright, advancement laboratories and its professors and trainees, the tech skill companies look for and depend upon.

Georgia Tech literally put Midtown Atlanta on the development and technology site choice map when it opened Technology Square in 2003. The 1.4 million-square-foot development district sponsored by Georgia Tech covers 8 city blocks and includes incubator area as well as a dynamic mixed-use part that offered new life to an inactive section of Midtown.

Today, Tech Square is Atlanta’s and Georgia’s innovation epicenter and is the home of several of the city’s major business development centers. When NCR transferred from rural Gwinnett County to Midtown, it specifically mentioned Georgia Tech as a significant reason it moved. Its brand-new head office at 864 Spring St. is surrounding to Tech Square.

“Atlanta has actually been making slow, consistent development with the work of the universities, and it’s not simply Georgia Tech,” McGowan stated. “While Georgia Tech’s Technology Square created the conditions that ultimately would develop an innovation culture here, Georgia State’s leadership” in intellectual property and a growing law school were likewise essential, he stated.

In 2015, Georgia State’s College of Law established its Center for Intellectual Property to work as a “understanding incubator” and link between academic community and companies that depend greatly on patents, trademarks and copyrights and to eliminate to safeguard them.

While Midtown is home to most of Atlanta’s large innovation centers, Buckhead also is beginning to complete for them. Mercedes-Benz’s selection of WeWork’s Terminus area reveals the area known mainly as Atlanta’s financial district can draw in innovation centers, said Matt Mooney, senior vice president and managing director of Atlanta for Cousins Characteristic, the owner of Terminus.

“It acts as additional recognition of the momentum in the Buckhead Tech Passage,” Mooney said.

Looking forward, Atlanta is well-positioned to win extra innovation centers, stated McGowan. He prepares to leave Atlanta next month to end up being the first president of Greater Seattle Partners, a public-private collaboration developed to create additional economic growth and competitiveness in the Puget Sound region.

“The world has to take Atlanta seriously now when it pertains to tech development here in the heart of the Deep South,” McGowan stated. “Global business must ask themselves, ‘Would we rather battle our way through the West Coast ecosystems like San Francisco or Seattle or Austin or go to a burgeoning location and forward-leaning city that’s home to numerous Fortune 500 companies?”

Home Depot to Pour $1.2 Billion into National Supply Chain

Home Depot plans to invest $1.2 billion in its supply chain in the next 5 years, broadening its business realty costs as it looks for to speed shipment times to consumers throughout the United States.

As part of the effort, the Atlanta-based house improvement chain will add brand-new direct satisfaction centers, with same-day or next-day shipment, equipped with extra merchandise.

Mark Holifield, Home Depot’s executive vice president of supply chain and product advancement, stated at a current financier’s conference that the business’s direct fulfillment centers currently “aren’t close enough to offer one-day parcel service to 70 percent of our clients.”

The brand-new fulfillment centers will probably be a combination of ground-up development and repurposed city warehouses, stated Annie McFarland, a Home Depot interactions supervisor.

Business across the country are significantly rehabbing urban storage facilities to faster deliver goods and cut transport costs. Seattle-based Amazon, for instance, which is thought about a leader in that kind of business, operates 322 U.S. warehouse and shipment stations, primarily in city locations.

Scott Mushkin, handling director at Wolfe Research in New York City, composed in a recent report that Home Depot’s move is a way to “safeguard itself from a home improvement market share grab by Amazon.”

Home Depot’s $1.2 billion investment belongs to a larger $11 billion financial investment in its operations, consisting of $5.4 billion in store upgrades. Forty-five percent of online orders are picked up in the shop, “so we must buy them to keep them pertinent,” stated Ann-Marie Campbell, the business’s executive vice president of U.S. stores, at the financier’s conference.

Rees' ' Rocks Roll on to the National Science Structure Repository

One burning concern has sustained UNLV geologist Peg Rees’s profession: Could America and Antarctica be two pieces of the same ancient supercontinent?

Research in the 1980s recommended that theory was possible, with geological findings in rocks discovered in the Western United States bearing striking similarities to rocks recuperated from icy mountaintops in Antarctica.

From 1984 to 1996, Rees finished 8 field seasons in Antarctica to test the theory. She was signed up with by a team of researchers and numerous mountaineers.

“We had an interest in collecting data that would contribute to the understanding of international restoration of the earth’s crust in between 825 million and 540 million years ago,” stated Rees, who retires this month from a 32-year career at UNLV. “The theory was that there was one supercontinent, long prior to Pangea and prior to Gondwana. It was called Rodinia, and over the many millions of years, it began to spread apart.”

On her very first trip to Antarctica, Rees and her team survived an airplane crash. On another celebration, they endured a helicopter crash.

They were undeterred.

Each season, they climbed the frozen range of mountains, chiseling samples from rocks and stones poking through the layers of ice. They would travel up and down the peaks, in some cases five times a day, each bring 45 to 90 pounds of rocks and soil samples at a time.

In total, Rees’ fieldwork brought some 4,000 pounds of rocks and soil from Antarctica to UNLV. In the labs, Rees and her group took a look at the products and compared them with samples from the United States. Their goal was to establish the geological history of the various mountains in Antarctica, from the Holyoake Variety and Starshot Glacier to the Northern Churchill Mountains and the Argentina Range.

Rees also was drawn into administrative functions at the university. She increased through the ranks to her newest posts as vice provost for Faculty Quality and head of the Public Lands Institute.

As she heads into retirement, she wanted to make sure the collection is offered to the next generation of scientists.

On June 29, the stacks that lined the lab at UNLV Paradise Campus were transferred to the Byrd Polar and Environment Proving Ground at Ohio State University, which is home to the National Science Structure’s U.S. Polar Rock Repository.

Anay Gomez, ’17 BS Earth and Environmental Science, and a research support expert at UNLV, has actually invested the past six months cataloguing the large collection. She examined, labeled, and loaded each stone by hand, filling 94 boxes and 4 pallets.

“This has actually been a really incredible job,” Gomez said. “To deal with a faculty member who has actually been to Antarctica and recovered all these rocks for us to study, for more information about how our planet, our home is moving and living– for me, it is a truly special experience. Going Through Dr. Rees’ field books, you get a sense that this was truly effort.”

rock sample
rock sample<

Gas prices in Las Vegas following national downward trend

Monday, June 18, 2018|9:02 a.m.

Gas costs in the Las Vegas location are following the national downward pattern.

GasBuddy.com reports the typical market price of a gallon of gas in the area is $3.27. That’s according to a survey of 649 gas stations.

Gas rates in Las Vegas Sunday were about 2 cents a gallon lower than a week earlier and about 65 cents higher than a year earlier.

GasBuddy.com petroleum analyst Patrick DeHaan states vehicle drivers are seeing the most affordable average gasoline rates in a month. He states this comes as the “OPEC appears poised to change oil production levels” and the U.S. nears hitting 11 million barrels pumped a day.

The national average has fallen about 2 cents per gallon in the past week, to $2.89.