Tag Archives: native

Las Vegas native makes clothing for residents to reveal their city pride

[not able to retrieve full-text content] Krystal Rosenthal was born and raised in Las Vegas, and she’s wagering there are more people like her than many people think. She began her apparel business with the concept in mind that residents would wish to reveal their pride in Las Vegas the way other cities’ locals do, which Las Vegas apparel doesn’t need to be glittery mementos of the Strip.

For Native Students, a Guide Along the Course

Some folks who find a TV program they like will live-tweet it with other fans or binge on Netflix. Then there’s Kayla Bland: She decided she was going to be the next “House, M.D.”

And the recent Las Vegas Academy graduate is well on her method thanks to UNLV’s Journey program, which matches Native American and other minority 11th- and 12th-graders throughout the nation with professors mentors who coach the students as they complete grant-funded health research.

This is the second summer season that Bland, 18, has dealt with a project examining a brain protein and its function in neurodegenerative diseases– research study that intends to help in worldwide efforts to further early detection and treatment offerings for Alzheimer’s, sports concussions, or other terrible brain injury clients. She officially registers at UNLV this fall, with her eye on a biochemistry degree and a neuroscience minor.

“My mommy was enjoying ‘Home,’ and she said ‘Come here; view this with me.’ I have no idea why but it hit me so hard and I stated ‘I like this things!” remembered Bland. She was 16, the age when many teenagers’ focus is on Sweet 16 celebrations or motorist’s licenses, however “I chose I’m going to be a neurosurgeon. That’s it. I have actually decided.”

“It’s going to be a lot of work,” she included, “however I’m prepared.” College- and career-readiness are among the goals of Journey, a ten-week summer program that yearly draws about 400 minority high school candidates nationwide who have an interest in hands-on experience with biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social sciences. The program, now entering its sixth year, is funded by the National Institutes of Health and coordinated by the UNLV School of Neighborhood Health Sciences’ American Indian Research and Education Center (AIREC).

Accepted trainees are paired with teachers at universities across the nation (other host websites this year include University of Hawaii, UCLA, and Stanford) whose competence match students’ interests. At the end of the summer, they are flown to Bethesda, Md. to hear from market scientists and scientists and receive reviews after providing their work.

This summer season, 22 enrollees were assigned to UNLV, which targets American Indian/Alaska Native trainees– most of whom live in outside of Nevada in rural farming areas or appointments with little to no access to innovation or college institutions– and trainees in Puerto Rico.

About 95 percent of UNLV Journey participants have gone on to college, said AIREC executive director Carolee Dodge-Francis.

“We actually want them to comprehend research study approaches– how you craft a research study question or hypothesis, exactly what are the approaches where you attempt to answer that concern, what may be your outcomes,” said Dodge-Francis, a member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin who is known throughout the country for her work on obesity and Type 2 diabetes avoidance and education in Native American neighborhoods. “We have found that our students truly took advantage of the program once they go to college.”

And the program isn’t really simply for trainees with access to a regional college. Though lots of students are matched with colleges near their homes, Dodge-Francis and other mentors go the extra mile– actually– to make the program accessible. For instance, Dodge-Francis has taken a trip to a remote Alaskan fishing village off the Bering Sea for a site visit, and videoconferencing is often utilized for mentoring sessions throughout the summertime.”The Journey program is so worthwhile for the larger neighborhoods the students come from since health variations are best dealt with by a varied science workforce with beneficial interests in these problems,” she stated. “Purchasing these underrepresented students helps establish a healthcare labor force capable of creating culturally-grounded health promo and illness avoidance techniques, especially when it comes to some Native tribal neighborhoods where such resources are practically nonexistent.”

That’s a sentiment shared by Dartanyon Jones, an 18-year-old recent graduate of Green Valley High School in Henderson, Nev.

. Jones, who is half Native- and half African-American, said the love of genetics instilled in him by his 9th grade biology teacher amplified during an internship last summertime observing research into diabetes– a health problem that disproportionately affects both sides of his heritage– at the National Institutes of Health.

This summertime, he invests his days in a UNLV laboratory staining and analyzing slides, immersed in research led by college student Camille Catelo into the health impacts of asbestos.

“I think this is a really great program that sheds light on the research study process. It isn’t really as simple as it looks,” stated Jones, an ambitious NIH geneticist who will begin classes at Howard University in the fall.

Jones’ Native side of the household is from the Wolf Point reservation in rural Montana. He said loved ones have informed him that it’s very tough for Native American youth to see chance beyond their village. “Programs like these offer chance to people who without it wouldn’t have the opportunity to experience settings like this,” he stated.

And it’s not just the hands-on, resume-building, passion-solidifying experience that Bland likes about the Journey program. She said it has assisted her build confidence and network with like-minded peers.

For her mentors, wife-husband team Rochelle and Dustin Hines, the chance to encourage young minds interested in getting a headstart on fixing international health problems is a win.

“It is a labor of love. Mentorship is a substantial foundation of exactly what we’re attempting to do at UNLV,” Rochelle stated. “Dustin and I both benefited as undergraduate trainees from having exposure to science and that’s something we’re really motivated to attempt to continue with our trainees.”

Included Dustin: “One of the important things we understand in our field is that in the next Ten Years with the demographics of the infant boomers, Alzheimer’s disease will affect health care throughout the world. There’s a push in the neurosciences, partly for that reason, to identify manner ins which will help those affected lead a greater quality of life. And Kayla’s task fits straight into that.”

Native Americans walk out of musical depicting stereotypes

Sunday, June 18, 2017|4:07 p.m.

LARAMIE, Wyo.– The University of Wyoming is alerting audiences about offensive product in a taking a trip musical after Native American high school trainees walked out of a performance of “The Fantasticks.”

The walkout happened Thursday throughout intermission, The Laramie Boomerang reported. It wasn’t clear the number of students participating in the Native American Summer season Institute at the campus in Laramie left of the show.

The 1960 musical, which has to do with 2 surrounding dads who deceive their kids into falling in love by pretending to fight, contains a scene where characters dress up as and villainize Native Americans. Participants stated they were also stunned at the casual usage of the word “rape” in the musical’s discussion.

The walkout prompted criticism from UW’s United Multicultural Council and a boycott by another summer camp. The Upward Bound group canceled strategies to participate in Saturday’s efficiency the Department of Theater and Dance.

“The program especially demeans Native American cultures with outdated stereotypes of Native American appropriation by non-native actors using headdresses/warbonnets,” according to a statement by the United Multicultural Council. “It likewise represents Native American and Latino/Hispanic characters as the bad guys or villains of the program.”

The university prepared a program insert for future efficiencies describing the scene.

“With historical productions, we see a ‘point in time,’ which is various from the one where we live,” the insert reads. “We see portrayals of characters that hurt to view as 21st century audiences. The obstacle then, in producing historical works, is to help audiences comprehend the context and/or story for the play without taking unnecessary or unlawful liberties with the script.”

The long-running musical, a staple of regional, community and high school theater, plays in four various Wyoming neighborhoods today before closing next weekend in Laramie. The musical, which features the songs “Attempt to Remember” and “Quickly It’s Gon na Rain,” closed previously this month in New York City, having played an overall of 21,552 efficiencies in the capital of American theater.

Tim Nichols, who assisted set up the Native American Summertime Institute, informed The Boomerang that the material was regrettable

“It’s a 1960s play, but it was, in my view, unsuitable,” he said. “We shared our interest in the theater department and we shared our concerns with the trainees and, you understand, we’re OK.”

‘Archie’ cartoonist Tom Moore passes away in his native El Paso

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The El Paso Times/ AP

In this July 15, 2014, photo, “Archie” cartoonist Tom Moore stands for a picture in El Paso, Texas. Moore, who brought to life the escapades of the freckled-face, red-haired character, passed away Monday, July 20, 2015, in Texas. He was 86.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015|8:14 p.m.

EL PASO, Texas– Tom Moore, the “Archie” cartoonist who brought to life the adventures of a freckled-face, red-haired character, has died in Texas. He was 86.

Moore, who began drawing cartoons while in the U.S. Navy throughout the Korean War, died early Monday early morning while in hospice care in his hometown of El Paso, his boy Lito Bujanda-Moore told The Associated Press on Tuesday. He said his daddy was identified with throat cancer within the past week and picked not to go through treatment.

Moore drew Archie Andrews and his pals on and off from 1953 until he retired in the late 1980s. Yearly sales of the comic frequently exceeded half a million throughout the 1960s, according to the El Paso Times.

“I did one comics a month,” Moore informed the paper in 1996. “I did everything. We constantly worked six months ahead. I ‘d be doing Christmas concerns in June and beach stories with a foot of snow outside my window.”

After the war, Moore utilized financing available through the GI Costs to participate in a school in New York for cartoonists. He studied under “Tarzan” comic strip illustrator Burne Hogarth.

Soon after, Moore registered with Archie Comics in New York. Bob Montana developed “Archie” in 1941, and Moore took over in 1953.

However by 1961, Moore couldn’t ignore the itch to be closer to the mountains of far western Texas, according to his son. He and his family moved from Long Island, New York, back to his native El Paso that year, and he later on took a break from comics and worked in public relations.

“He always felt that his heart belonged at the foot of the Franklin Mountains,” Moore’s kid, Lito Bujanda-Moore, informed the newspaper.

Bujanda-Moore said he dad enjoyed every element of nature: trees, rivers, mountains and deserts. One year the family cooked their Thanksgiving dish in your home, then took all of it out to the desert just east of El Paso.

“We would have the ability to have a fantastic Thanksgiving dinner under the stars,” he said.

Archie Comics’ editorial director, Victor Gorelick, who has worked at the business for more than 50 years, stated Moore “was a cartoonist’s cartoonist.” He noted that Archie Comics welcomed Moore back to assist revamp Archie’s buddy, Jughead, and continued to be with the business up until he retired.

“Tom was uproarious and had a propensity for assembling really excellent, funny gags and special pages when he worked at Archie,” Gorelick said. “He was most likely best understood here for inking our ‘Jughead’ relaunch decades back. We’re all unfortunate to hear this news and want his family the best throughout this time.”

After retiring, Moore kept tabs on Archie– and disagreed when the comics business decided to kill off the character.

The El Paso Museum of Art showed some of Moore’s work and his vast comic collection about 20 years back.

“I have actually enjoyed exactly what I’ve done and I am happy that others liked it, too,” Moore said at the time. “I believe it’s such a kick that my stuff is going to be hanging at the museum. Who knew Archie would have such universal appeal?”

Together with his child, Moore and his wife of 63 years, Ruth, also raised a child, Holly Mathew.

Bujanda-Moore stated there will be a party of his dad’s life in coming weeks.

'' Archie ' cartoonist Tom Moore dies in his native El Paso

Image

The El Paso Times via AP

In this July 15, 2014 image, Tom Moore, the “Archie” cartoonist, postures for an image in El Paso, Texas. Moore, who brought to life the escapades of a freckled-face, red-haired character, has actually passed away Monday, July 20, 2015, in Texas. He was 86.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015|8:14 p.m.

EL PASO, Texas– Tom Moore, the “Archie” cartoonist who brought to life the escapades of a freckled-face, red-haired character, has actually died in Texas. He was 86.

Moore, who began drawing cartoons while in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, died early Monday morning while in hospice care in his hometown of El Paso, his son Lito Bujanda-Moore told The Associated Press on Tuesday. He said his dad was identified with throat cancer within the previous week and selected not to go through treatment.

Moore drew Archie Andrews and his pals on and off from 1953 up until he retired in the late 1980s. Yearly sales of the comic regularly surpassed half a million during the 1960s, according to the El Paso Times.

“I did one comic book a month,” Moore told the newspaper in 1996. “I did everything. We always worked six months ahead. I ‘d be doing Christmas concerns in June and beach stories with a foot of snow outside my window.”

After the war, Moore made use of financing readily available through the GI Bill to attend a school in New york city for cartoonists. He studied under “Tarzan” cartoon illustrator Burne Hogarth.

Soon after, Moore signed up with Archie Comics in New york city. Bob Montana produced “Archie” in 1941, and Moore took over in 1953.

However by 1961, Moore could not neglect the itch to be closer to the mountains of far western Texas, according to his child. He and his household moved from Long Island, New York, back to his native El Paso that year, and he later on took a break from comics and worked in public relations.

“He constantly felt that his heart belonged at the foot of the Franklin Mountains,” Moore’s boy, Lito Bujanda-Moore, told the newspaper.

Bujanda-Moore stated he daddy liked every element of nature: trees, rivers, mountains and deserts. One year the family prepared their Thanksgiving dish in the house, then took all of it out to the desert just east of El Paso.

“We would have the ability to have a fantastic Thanksgiving supper under the stars,” he said.

Archie Comics’ editorial director, Victor Gorelick, who has actually worked at the business for more than 50 years, said Moore “was a cartoonist’s cartoonist.” He noted that Archie Comics welcomed Moore back to help revamp Archie’s buddy, Jughead, and stayed with the company until he retired.

“Tom was uproarious and had a propensity for putting together truly great, humorous gags and unique pages when he worked at Archie,” Gorelick said. “He was most likely very well known right here for inking our ‘Jughead’ relaunch years ago. We’re all unfortunate to hear this news and wish his household the very best throughout this time.”

After retiring, Moore kept tabs on Archie– and disagreed when the comic book business chose to exterminate the character.

The El Paso Museum of Art displayed some of Moore’s work and his huge comic collection about 20 years back.

“I have enjoyed exactly what I’ve done and I am happy that others liked it, too,” Moore said at the time. “I believe it’s such a kick that my stuff is going to be hanging at the museum. Who knew Archie would have such universal appeal?”

Together with his boy, Moore and his partner of 63 years, Ruth, also raised a child, Holly Mathew.

Bujanda-Moore said there will be a celebration of his dad’s life in coming weeks.

Native Las Vegan and Emmy Award winner Gordie Saiger passes away at 66

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thanks to Max Saiger

Las Vegas native Gordie Saiger, a long time Hollywood video camera operator, is shown in this picture offered by his child, Max Saiger.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015|2 a.m.

Emmy Award-winning cameraman Gordon “Gordie” Saiger, child of Las Vegas pc gaming pioneer Morton Saiger, died Monday night at a Henderson healthcare facility. He was 66.

Saiger, a native Las Vegan who lived in Henderson, died of liver failure after a prolonged fight with leukemia considering that 2008.

Saiger’s family, including his only kid, Max Saiger, was at his bedside when he died at St. Rose Dominican’s Siena School.

Max remembered him “as the best dad anyone could ever desire.”

“It was his strength and wisdom that made me into the guy I am today,” the 23-year-old Henderson homeowner said.

Saiger had deep Las Vegas roots and came from a household with a Hollywood background. He finished from Las Vegas High School in 1967 and studied briefly at UNLV.

Saiger likewise served as a tank crewman in the Nevada National Guard for a couple of years, his boy said.

He developed as a professional photographer and cameraman while working for Las Vegas news companies in the 1970s. His career grew– he covered boxing, motor sports, the Olympics, local shows and other significant events.

Over the years, Saiger remained to become a special skill in his field. His work at tv networks such as NBC, PBS and CBS made him elections for 5 Emmy Awards; he won 2 for his camerawork in HBO’s “Britney Spears Live from Las Vegas” production and the CBS miniseries “The Magic of David Copperfield XV: Fires of Passi.”

Saiger followed his father, Morton, into the show business, as the senior appeared in Hollywood silent films, including an additional part in “The Crown that Lies” with fellow immigrant Polla Negri, and as a stunt double for Rudolph Valentino.

Morton Saiger, who passed away in 1997, was dubbed “Mr. Frontier” throughout his 50-year stint with the Frontier resort.

Funeral plans, under the direction of Palm Eastern Mortuary, are pending.

Saiger is survived by his mom, Reba Saiger, his boy Max, his sibling Debi Saiger, and his nephews Matthew and Andrew Skurow.