Tag Archives: nevada

Reno councilman to lead Nevada state energy office

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019|11:36 a.m.

RENO– Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak has selected Reno Councilman David Bobzien to lead the Nevada state energy office.

The Reno Gazette-Journal reports Bobzien’s visit implies the Reno City board will have to determine how to fill his vacancy. State law offers the council two options: select a replacement or hold a special election.

Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve says it is prematurely to talk about which direction the council will go.

State law enables the city to conduct an election with just mail-in tallies.

Bobzien was designated to the seat that represents the entire city in 2014, changing former Councilwoman Schieve when she was elected mayor.

Throughout his time on council, Bobzien pressed several tidy energy and performance programs.

Bobzien did not wish to talk about a potential replacement for his seat.

Lawmaker pay raises historically undesirable in Nevada

Legislature Opening Day

Legislature Opening Day Lance Iversen/ AP Assembly members applaud Republican John Hambrick after he was voted speaker at the opening of the Legislature in Carson City, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015.

Nevada lawmakers are paid about $9,000 for their work during the legislative session, a figure that those very same lawmakers have actually been reticent to raise, professionals say.

Legislators are paid for the first half of the 120-day session held every two years, in addition to a daily allowance for costs.

The pay is fairly low compared to some other states, such as California, where lawmakers are paid more than $100,000 annually, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Some political professionals argue that higher pay makes it possible for individuals who otherwise could not pay for to take time away from their tasks to serve.

But other scientists say greater pay does not immediately cause more socioeconomic variety in state legislatures and can motivate some legislators to make a career out of politics.

Nevada’s tight hang on legal pay is bound in a limited government mindset that stretches back to the constitutional convention, said Michael Green, UNLV associate history professor.

The initial constitution approved in 1864 restricted sessions to 60 days, paid lawmakers $60 per session for expenditures and included a $2 daily for the speaker of the Assembly, lieutenant governor and president of the Senate.

” It was partially that they didn’t expect the lawmakers to invest much time there, and it definitely wasn’t going to be their primary task, so paying them just a little bit was not a problem,” Green said. “Second, I believe part of the goal was to dissuade individuals from staying there too long.”

Nevada lawmakers are paid about $150 a day for the very first half of the session, with a $140 per diem for all 120 days. The state also reserves cash for interim committees that satisfy in between legal sessions to conduct research studies, keep track of legislation and make modifications to predicted versus real revenue and expenses, among other duties.

In the past, the state has actually looked at extending sessions, making them yearly and raising lawmakers’ pay.

Former state Sen. Tick Segerblom, D-Las Vegas, sponsored a costs in 2013 to raise legislators’ pay from $8,777 to $24,000 per session. The expense would likewise have needed yearly sessions and conferences outside Carson City if most of each party concurred.

But efforts to raise legislator compensation have normally been unpopular in Nevada, Green stated. Lawmakers increased pensions in 1989 and were met heavy opposition, stated Green and Michael Bowers, a UNLV political science teacher.

” I think many have the mindset that candidates understood the pay when they ran and by running they implicitly accepted it,” Bowers said.

The state tried to move toward meeting annually in 1960 by including a session dedicated completely to budget plan concerns, but riders and special tasks legislators attempted to attach to the legislation helped thwart the change, Green said.

” Traditionally, it does not get a lot of traction,” Green stated of such propositions. “I think that is a sign of officials here figuring the public is not too crazy about that.”

A study published in the American Government Evaluation in November 2016 says the theory that higher pay leads to greater economic diversity in state legislatures “does not hold much water,” wrote political researchers Nicholas Carnes of Duke University and Eric R. Hansen, now a teacher at Loyola University Chicago.

The researchers discovered the working class was least represented in states that paid legislators incomes of more than $75,000, with comparable outcomes after changing for aspects such as much heavier work.

” Information on the makeup of state legislatures in the late 1970s, the mid-1990s, and the late 2000s suggest that in states that use leaders higher incomes, working-class politicians are in fact crowded out by profession political specialists,” the report stated.

Green stated that while some research may challenge the link in between higher pay and economic diversity, it might still be the case. Bowers stated the time dedication is much more of an issue than pay in making legislatures more diverse when it pertains to race, ethnic culture and gender.

” Very few people can take 4 months away from their job every other year,” Bowers said. “Companies need them to be at their positions at all times.”

But such obstacles have not stopped the Nevada Legislature from becoming more diverse, Green said. The 2019 Legislature will be the first in the nation represented by a majority of ladies.

” The variety we’re now seeing I think shows our society more than anything about the pay or anything associated to it,” Green said.

Nevada to receive $13.3 M under settlement with Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo

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=” Wells Fargo” title= “Wells Fargo “/ > Richard Drew/ AP In this Might 17, 2018, file picture, the logo design for Wells Fargo appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Friday, Dec. 28, 2018|11:03 a.m.

CARSON CITY– Nevada stands to receive over $13.3 million from Wells Fargo & & Co. under a $575 million multistate settlement to fix claims that the bank violated state consumer protection laws.

The state Attorney general of the United States’s Office and Wells Fargo individually revealed the settlement Friday, with Wells Fargo CEO and President Tim Sloan saying his business is making a “serious dedication to making things right in regard to previous problems” while working “to develop a better bank.”

Nevada Chief Law Officer Adam Laxalt said the settlement safeguards Nevadans from deceptive practices while holding Wells Fargo liable for conduct that consisted of opening millions of unapproved accounts and enrolling consumers into online banking services without their understanding or consent.

Under the settlement, Wells Fargo will produce a consumer redress evaluation program.

Clark County commissioners designate 2 to fill Nevada Senate jobs

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Steve Marcus A view of the Nevada State Legislature building in Carson City on Monday, Feb. 11, 2013.

Released Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018|6:10 p.m.

Upgraded 1 hour, 36 minutes ago

Nevada’s Legislature is almost set for the 2019 session, with 3 more seats still to be filled after Clark County chose replacements for two outgoing Democrats. Commissioners chose previous Assemblyman Chris Brooks and Dallas Harris, a lawyer with the Public Utilities Commission, to replace Sens. Tick Segerblom, chosen to the county commission this year, and Aaron Ford, who won the Attorney general of the United States’s Workplace.

The commission also chose Republican Gregory Hafen II, general manager of Pahrump Energy Company Inc., to join candidates picked by Lincoln and Nye counties to fill the Assembly seat of the late whorehouse owner Dennis Hof.

Counties are anticipated to meet Friday to make a decision on the Hof seat. Most of the Assembly district remains in Nye County, which will carry the most weight in deciding the appointment.

Commissioners said they tend to follow the recommendation of the caucus representing the seat, ensuring the appointee can get to Carson City and instantly start dealing with fellow lawmakers.

Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani said that the caucuses might require to open their procedure in selecting their favored prospect. She said there were many certified individuals who made an application for the uninhabited seats.

Clark County will now need to designate a replacement for Brooks, who stated five generations of his family have lived in Senate District 3. Brooks has been a vocal advocate for renewable resource policies in the Legislature, consisting of bring back an utility credit program for solar consumers’ excess power.

The county also needs to fill Assembly District 11, previously represented by Democrat Olivia Diaz. She just recently resigned her seat and announced her candidateship for Las Vegas City Board.

Lawmakers are anticipated to assemble in Carson City in February.

Quick Take: What the 4th National Environment Assessment Way for Nevada and the West

The most recent national climate assessment records the future effects of a warming world more completely than reports that have come before it, UNLV geology professor Matt Lachniet states.

Lachniet studies environment history that extends thousands of years into the past, and what he’s learned from his research can provide us an idea of what Nevada is capable of sustaining today, and into the future.

As he puts it, Nevada is moving in only one instructions: to a location that will just become hotter and drier.

“There’s nothing that’s going to save us from that,” he said.

However if some modifications are made, we can minimize the degree to which that takes place, and likewise stem the loss of our supply of water. We overtook Lachniet to comprehend what Nevada, and the West, can learn from the 4th National Environment Evaluation.

How much will temperature levels increase and what does it indicate for Las Vegans? We’ll be experiencing more very hot days. We’re looking at potentially 10 to 30 more days each year that exceed 90 degrees. It’s currently beginning now, and it’s going to end up being a lot more common in the next couple of years.

Definitely it’s going to be a lot hotter so we’ll be spending more energy in the summer season for our cooling. It’s going to wind up costing us more. But I think we’ll have the ability to adapt in Las Vegas to the increased heat. We’ll simply have to spend more time in doors during the summer.

A significant takeaway: We’re actually looking at minimized circulation of water in the Colorado River– an area that sustains 55 million people. Warmer temperatures are causing less of the snowpack from the Rocky Mountains to make it into the river, and we have less water offered.

There’s 2 reasons the water levels in Lake Mead are receding: we’re utilizing more than nature is giving us, and nature is providing us less. And the decrease in water circulation has a lot to do with increasing temperatures. There’s less snowfall in the winter due to the fact that temperatures are greater. When the Spring season comes, there’s less melting snow that goes into the river.

What does a decreasing supply of water suggest for the West? In the Colorado River Basin, it has to do with selecting how we reallocate water throughout scarcities. We need to share between Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. There’s been a great deal of talks already in between the states about how to handle drought contingency strategies, and they’re working on some plans today.

The fundamental concept is that if water levels in Lake Mead go listed below the important low-level, the different parties are going to need to reduce their water use.

We can slow that reduction, and even stop it if we have climate policies that decarbonize. But if we keep going on the exact same trajectory, there will not suffice water to sustain the economy as we understand it in the southwest.

Are there other essential takeaways for the West? Yes. As the environment heats up here, we’re going to have more wildfires. Soil can hold onto less water when it’s hot. And more wildfires will adversely affect air quality in Nevada.

And while water level increase doesn’t directly effect Nevada as the state is not beside an ocean, we’ll experience secondary effects. Parts of the Bay Area, San Diego and Los Angeles will be underwater 100 years from now because of sea level rise. And those people need to go someplace. It’s likely that some of those people will wind up in Las Vegas if they can hammer out the traffic on the I-15.

Is there a silver lining? The good news is that Nevada is already doing a great job of conserving water. We’ve been reducing our per capita usage while also growing our economy.

The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s rebate program– which pays house owners to secure their lawn and other high water-use landscaping– is one factor for this. Outdoors irrigation is water that we use and lose. Turf draws up the water and it goes back into the environment.

Presently, we’re staying below our water limitation from the Colorado River Basin.

About Lachniet: Lachniet is a climate scientist who concentrates on paleoclimatology, which is the research study of environment variations over the last few hundred thousand years. His main focus is speleoclimatology– a field that concentrates on making use of cave deposits to understand previous environment variations. Most just recently he’s been diving in caves in Central America to bring greater understanding to environment history as it relates to the Maya civilization.

Quick Take: What the 4th National Environment Evaluation suggests for Nevada and the West

The most recent national environment evaluation records the future effects of a warming planet better than reports that have come before it, UNLV geology teacher Matt Lachniet states.

Lachniet research studies environment history that extends thousands of years into the past, and what he’s gained from his research study can offer us a concept of what Nevada is capable of sustaining today, and into the future.

As he puts it, Nevada is moving in just one instructions: to a place that will just become hotter and drier.

“There’s absolutely nothing that’s going to conserve us from that,” he stated.

But if some modifications are made, we can reduce the degree to which that occurs, and likewise stem the loss of our water system. We caught up with Lachniet to understand what Nevada, and the West, can learn from the Fourth National Environment Assessment.

How much will temperature levels increase and what does it suggest for Las Vegans? We’ll be experiencing more very hot days. We’re taking a look at potentially 10 to 30 more days each year that surpass 90 degrees. It’s already beginning now, and it’s going to become even more common in the next number of years.

Definitely it’s going to be a lot hotter so we’ll be spending more energy in the summertime for our a/c. It’s going to wind up costing us more. But I believe we’ll be able to adapt in Las Vegas to the increased heat. We’ll simply need to invest more time in doors throughout the summer season.

A major takeaway: We’re actually looking at lowered circulation of water in the Colorado River– an area that sustains 55 million individuals. Warmer temperatures are causing less of the snowpack from the Rocky Mountains to make it into the river, and we have less water readily available.

There’s 2 reasons why the water levels in Lake Mead are receding: we’re utilizing more than nature is offering us, and nature is giving us less. And the reduction in water flow has a lot to do with increasing temperatures. There’s less snowfall in the winter since temperatures are higher. When the Spring season comes, there’s less melting snow that enters into the river.

What does a diminishing water system mean for the West? In the Colorado River Basin, it’s about selecting how we reallocate water during lacks. We need to share between Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. There’s been a lot of talks already between the states about how to handle dry spell contingency plans, and they’re dealing with some plans today.

The basic idea is that if water levels in Lake Mead go below the crucial low-level, the various celebrations are going to have to minimize their water use.

We can slow that reduction, or even stop it if we have environment policies that decarbonize. But if we keep going on the very same trajectory, there will not suffice water to sustain the economy as we know it in the southwest.

Exist other essential takeaways for the West? Yes. As the climate heats up here, we’re going to have more wildfires. Soil can hold onto less water when it’s hot. And more wildfires will adversely affect air quality in Nevada.

And while water level increase does not directly impact Nevada as the state is not next to an ocean, we’ll experience secondary impacts. Parts of the Bay Location, San Diego and Los Angeles will be undersea 100 years from now due to the fact that of water level increase. And those individuals need to go someplace. It’s likely that a few of those people will end up in Las Vegas if they can fight through the traffic on the I-15.

Is there a silver lining? The good news is that Nevada is already doing an excellent job of saving water. We’ve been decreasing our per capita use while likewise growing our economy.

The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s rebate program– which pays homeowners to get their yard and other high water-use landscaping– is one reason for this. Outdoors irrigation is water that we use and lose. Turf draws up the water and it returns into the atmosphere.

Presently, we’re remaining below our water limitation from the Colorado River Basin.

About Lachniet: Lachniet is an environment researcher who focuses on paleoclimatology, which is the study of environment variations over the last couple of hundred thousand years. His primary focus is speleoclimatology– a field that concentrates on using cavern deposits to comprehend previous environment variations. Most recently he’s been diving in caves in Central America to bring greater understanding to environment history as it connects to the Maya civilization.

Democrats requiring higher Nevada renewable resource standard

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SolarReserve Crescent Dunes, a thermal solar plant near Tonopah, is the world’s first utility-scale center to include sophisticated molten salt power tower energy storage capabilities.

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018|3:15 p.m.

Democrats are going to introduce a greater renewable resource standard in the 2019 legal session rather than wait up until 2020 for a tally step to clear another round of ballot.

Nevada’s sustainable portfolio standard needs at least 25 percent of the state’s energy usage to come from renewable sources by 2025.

State Senate Majority Leader Kelvin Atkinson stated he prepares to introduce an expense that may be as high as one hundred percent renewables by 2050.

Gov. Brian Sandoval vetoed a 2017 costs requiring a 40 percent standard by 2030, mentioning unpredictability must the state select to reorganize its energy market. The expense became Ballot Question 6, requiring half renewables by 2030 and passing with more than 59 percent of the vote. It would have to pass again in 2020 to end up being law.

” We do not require to wait,” Atkinson said.

Katie Robbins, campaign supervisor of Nevadans for a Tidy Energy Future and the YES on 6 effort, said in a statement that the Legislature shouldn’t wait.

” We’re prepared to eliminate and win once again in 2 years, but we shouldn’t need to,” she stated. “Individuals of Nevada have made a clear statement about the future they want, and they need to not need to wait on it to come true. Legal leaders and our governor-elect have all recognized the requirement to guarantee a cleaner, healthier future. We look forward to working with them, our union partners, and the numerous thousands of Nevadans we heard from throughout this campaign to pass legislation well prior to citizens go back to the polls.”

Republican politicians are willing to talk about a greater standard, said recently elected Republican Assemblyman Tom Roberts, co-deputy minority leader.

” It’s going to be up for discussion this session,” he stated. “I ‘d be absolutely willing to look at it since it seems that our constituents want it.”

GOP Sen. Joe Hardy, assistant minority leader, also stated a discussion on raising the requirement was coming this session.

” We are still attempting to figure out how to implement the energy that’s going to be more sustainable than it has in the past, with the direction from our individuals,” he stated. “That’s what we have to do.”

The Legislature convenes in February for its biennial session. Democrats will control the governor’s office and the Legislature. They will have a super-majority in the Assembly.

Nevada joblessness rate declines to 4.4 percent in October

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018|11:18 a.m.

CARSON CITY– Nevada’s joblessness rate is down.

The state Department of Work, Training and Rehabilitation says Nevada’s joblessness rate dropped to 4.4 percent in October, down from 4.5 percent from September.

The department says the state’s economy added 5,100 tasks in October, with Chief Financial expert David Schmidt saying the task development extended across many industries, including building and construction, expert and company services and production.

Restoring Nevada and the rest of America can’t wait

Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018|2 a.m.

View more of the Sun’s opinion section

Having recently chaired the Nevada State Senate Transport Committee, I know that cities and towns across Nevada are doing their finest to repave roadways, upgrade water treatment plants, broaden broadband gain access to and address the critical infrastructure requirements of the future.

In Southern Nevada, we have invested substantial resources in tasks like the Interstate 11 passage and Task Neon, and are checking out new choices for light rail and traveler rail transport to Southern California.

But due to the fact that state and local governments are often limited in how we money these jobs, there are limitations to what we can achieve alone. We need a strong partner in the federal government.

Although Congress just recently approved a down payment for facilities financial investment, the additional $10 billion allocated doesn’t come close to satisfying the $2 trillion needed to restore our country’s facilities to real working order. We require Congress to prioritize a facilities strategy that will enhance our nation’s water, broadband and transport infrastructure, and purchases our country’s labor force.

Now that the election is over, we can get to work on this. I rely on that Sen.-elect Jacky Rosen and Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., who sits on the U.S. House Transport Committee, will go to work for Nevadans on this crucial investment in the future of our cities, counties and state.

I’m contacting Congress to partner with Nevada and our city governments to develop an infrastructure strategy that purchases our vision to build intermodal, sustainable and interconnected infrastructure networks that support a modern-day economy. Our nation is biggest when we purchase building excellent things and support working households.

America’s facilities problems can not wait. It’s time for Congress to deal with cities to rebuild and reimagine America’s infrastructure. I support our new members of Congress in addition to our tried-and-true champs in these efforts, as needs to every Nevadan.

Patricia Farley was chosen to the state Senate in 2014.

The Moth Premieres in Southern Nevada at UNLV Nov. 14

The Moth– a live storytelling show– will make its launching in southern Nevada at UNLV on Wednesday, Nov. 14.

The general public is invited to hear from five effective writers who will share their real and authentic experiences starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Artemus W. Ham Auditorium on UNLV’s campus. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Storytellers consist of quiet magician Teller ( of Penn and Teller); Las Vegas novelist, teacher, and editor Erica Vital-Lazare; and Chenjerai Kumanyika, the Peabody winning co-host of the podcast “Uncivil.”

Other storytellers include Vikram Krishnasamy, who operates at the Centers for Illness Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and Ruby Cooper, a mom, grandma, instructor, and writer based in Los Angeles.

The show will be hosted by the comic author and long time host of the Moth podcast, Dan Kennedy.

The Black Mountain Institute is hosting the event together with Nevada Public Radio, and “The Follower” publication, among the world’s leading journals of arts and culture which is produced and edited out of the Black Mountain Institute.

Tickets

Tickets are $10 for students and $15 for adults.

To buy tickets, check out the UNLV Carrying out Arts Center ticket office, call (702) 895-ARTS (2787 ), or order online.

Package office is located off of Cottage Grove Opportunity at S. Maryland Parkway, on the campus of UNLV.