Tag Archives: nevada

Nevada Tax Commission extends emergency situation pot guidelines

Friday, Nov. 3, 2017|12:40 p.m.

CARSON CITY– The Nevada Tax Commission voted to extend the existing emergency situation regulations enabling leisure cannabis licensing and sales for another 120 days.

The Nevada Appeal reports long-term policies, which were set to end Wednesday, are still waiting for legislative approval.

In accordance with the Supreme Court order released Oct. 20, the policies, which were extended Wednesday, state that new applications to disperse pot can only be issued to certified alcohol wholesalers.

That requirement makes recreational marijuana use legal in Nevada, offering liquor suppliers special rights to circulation for the very first 18 months of recreational sales.

However the guidelines also adopt the high court’s consentaneous order existing distribution licenses to recreational licensees on or before Sept. 14 will remain in impact for the full year from the date they were provided.

Nevada official says Yucca costs not most likely to pass Senate

Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017|10:47 a.m.

CARSON CITY– A costs to restart licensing of the Yucca Mountain hazardous waste repository might pass the U.S. Home but will most likely die in the Senate, a state authorities stated Wednesday.

Robert Halstead, director of the state Agency for Nuclear Projects, said he would not be shocked if the legislation got 300 votes in the House, but it “will never ever see the light of day” in the Senate.

Halstead informed the Commission on Nuclear Tasks on the current developments in the state’s battle to stop the website in Nye County from becoming a disposing ground for high-level radioactive waste from other states.

A House costs set aside $150 million for the Yucca Mountain task after President Donald Trump asked for $120 million in his budget blueprint. During the Obama Administration, moneying for the project was cut.

Your house expense by Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill., lost consciousness of committee by a 39-4 vote and, Halstead said, 100 members signed on to the expense.

“The Senate will be a various proposal,” former U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan, the commission chairman, said throughout a conference in Las Vegas. However if the expense were to make it through Congress, Trump would sign it, Bryan forecasted.

The Shimkus bill provides additional money for the state, local governments and Native American tribes. But, Halstead said, “We don’t desire their waste or their money.”

Finding Life and Dark Matter in Nevada'' s Hot Springs

It’s one of the greatest questions of mankind. Are we alone in deep space?

To help us find an answer, UNLV Life Sciences teacher and researcher Brian Hedlund will be studying bacteria and archaea, both single-celled bacteria, found in a hot spring in northern Nevada.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration just recently awarded Hedlund and partners at California State University – San Bernardino, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Stanford University, a $900,000 grant to study bacteria and archaea discovered in Great Boiling Spring, situated about 100 miles northeast of Reno, in Gerlach.

“This spring has deep lineages of life that have never been studied in the past,” Hedlund said. “The technology is now readily available to allow us to acquire insights into the biology of these organisms, which will help supply insight into the early diversity of life in the world.”

Hedlund discussed that the warm spring resembles the high-temperature geothermal location where life might have first formed on our world. And brand-new technology is permitting scientists to check hypotheses on the organisms’ catabolic and anabolic potential, acting on genomics work supported by a previous NASA grant. The work might also offer insights into molecular adaptations to life in extreme environments and the early diversity of life.

“We understand this hot spring has deep family trees of life that have never been studied in the past,” Hedlund stated. “We’re mapping out life in the world in a habitat similar to what’s been found on other worlds.”

To this day, the “microbial dark matter” Hedlund is studying cannot be grown in a lab, so it is very important to study them where they are plentiful, such as Fantastic Boiling Spring. A lot of bacteria and archaea are about one micron long. Simply puts 1,000 organisms span the head of a pin.

“We understand a little about half the animals on our own world and generally nothing about the other half,” Hedlund said. “Our company believe that comprehending all life on Earth will permit us to comprehend if life can exist elsewhere.”

Nevada official responsible for execution strategy has actually resigned

Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017|8:30 p.m.

Questions emerged about the approaching execution of a Nevada death row inmate who wants to pass away, with a disclosure in court that the state authorities who signed off on the untried three-drug protocol has resigned.

Clark County District Court Judge Jennifer Togliatti reacted with surprise Tuesday when she was informed that Dr. John DiMuro gave up Monday as primary state medical officer.

DiMuro says in a sworn file sent by the state chief law officer’s office that his resignation was “totally unrelated” to the prepared Nov. 14 execution of Scott Raymond Dozier.

Lawyers from the federal public protector’s office have been challenging the newly drawn-up protocol for Dozier’s deadly injection.

They stated outdoors court they required time to assess what effect DiMuro’s resignation will have.

Another hearing is set Friday afternoon.

Home Democratic chairman swings through Nevada to go over DACA, support prospects

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Yvonne Gonzalez Rep. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, went to UNLV, where students, activists and community leaders gathered for a roundtable on the Deferred Action for Youth Arrivals program on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017. He is signed up with by moderator Homero Gonzalez, philanthropy chairman of the UNLV Hispanic Law Student Association La Voz, and Congressional District 3 prospect Susie Lee, a Democrat whose project organized the roundtable.

Nevada'' s newbie jobless claims down 15 percent

Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017|9:31 a.m.

. The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation states preliminary claims for joblessness insurance coverage advantages amounted to 9,068 in September in the state.

That figure, which was released Monday, is down 15 percent from last August. It is the lowest of any month because August 1998.

Preliminary claims are down 3 percent from September 2016, when they were 9,358. September marks the seasonal low point of the year. The total pattern, best represented by the 12-month average, is at a post-recession low of 11,083 claims monthly.

A preliminary claim represents the very first phase of declare unemployment benefits and is therefore most closely related to the variety of people who have actually just recently lost their jobs, not the general level of unemployment.

Nevada'' s pot tax revenue jumps to almost $5 million in August

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John Locher/ AP People wait in line at the Essence cannabis dispensary in Las Vegas, Saturday, July 1, 2017, as recreational sales of marijuana start.

Monday, Oct. 23, 2017|5:30 p.m.

Nevada tax authorities state the 2nd month of legal sales of leisure cannabis generated simply under $5 million in tax revenue, up from $3.7 million in its very first month.

Nevada Tax Department spokeswoman Stephanie Klapstein stated the numbers are on pace to meet the state’s expectation of $120 million in state taxes over the next two years.

A 15 percent tax on wholesale circulation from farmers to dispensaries and 10 percent tax on leisure cannabis sales raised $4.86 million in August, up from 3.68 million in July. That cash goes to the state’s rainy day fund.

The $120 million biennial projection projects $5 million in regular monthly tax income. Klapstein states officials projected no earnings for July since of unpredictability surrounding licensing, distribution and regional ordinances.

State Sen. Tick Segerblom, who promoted legislation establishing the structure for Nevada’s leisure marijuana market in this year’s Legislature, called Thursday’s numbers “an excellent start,” including that tax revenue surpassing state forecasts was “an advantage” for public schools.

Ruined by among the greatest deficit spending in its 60-year history, the Clark County School District– the 5th biggest in the United States– has actually revealed it will be cutting up to $80 million this school year, primarily through teacher and administrator layoffs.

Segerblom said he expects monthly tax earnings to double by the very first six months of 2019, and is thinking about pushing for an unique legal session before then to assign additional marijuana tax income to the state’s debt-ridden schools.

“The tax numbers are going to keep growing,” he said. “There’s a lot more where this came from.”

Nevada cities ranked in yearly LGBTQ assessment