Tag Archives: nevada

Heavy snow in Sierra Nevada closes roadways, prompts cautions

Friday, March 16, 2018|3:18 p.m.

RENO– It’s a snow day in northern Nevada, where heavy build-up from a late-winter storm closed schools and public buildings in the Reno location, postponed opening a ski resort in the Sierra Nevada and triggered the closure of Interstate 80 to California.

Nevada Highway Patrol Cannon Fodder Matthew McLaughlin the interstate was closed Friday in between the Nevada state line and Colfax, California.

Mount Rose Highway also was closed during the morning, and Mount Rose Ski Area opened late.

The National Weather Service provided winter season storm and avalanche cautions for backcountry mountains, and meteorologist Evan LaGuardia said the 10 inches tape-recorded at Reno-Tahoe International Airport pushed the monthly accumulation to the fourth-most in last 100 years.

LaGuardia says another storm is due next week.

McLaughlin reported multiple reports of vehicles skidding off roadways in the Reno area, but stated no major injuries were reported.

TV ads target Nevada, 3 other states key to redistricting

Friday, March 16, 2018|8:49 a.m.

. The Democratic Governors Association says it’s investing $20 million on TELEVISION advertisements in four states where guvs will play an essential role in the next round of congressional redistricting.

The advertisement purchases revealed Friday target Michigan, Nevada, Ohio and Wisconsin and will run throughout the fall campaign season. Citizens in those states will be choosing governors this November who will have veto power over the new congressional maps drawn by state legislatures after the 2020 census.

All 4 states currently have Republican governors. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is looking for re-election, however the other GOP incumbents are term-limited.

Republicans control both legal chambers in Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. Democrats control the full Legislature in Nevada.

Both celebrations are trying to gain an edge when it pertains to redrawing districts.

Constructing a nuclear waste dump in Nevada is still the incorrect thing to do


< img class=" photograph" src=" /wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Yucca5_t653.jpg" alt =" Image"

/ > John Locher/ AP Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill., stands near the north portal of Yucca Mountain throughout a congressional trip Thursday, April 9, 2015, about 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018|2 a.m.

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Throughout a current congressional conversation on the proposed Yucca Mountain hazardous waste repository, Rep. John Shimkus of Illinois said, “There’s always hope that the elected leaders will do the best thing.”

He’s ideal. There definitely is hope that Congress and the Trump administration will abandon the job, close the door on any future conversation of it and end this dreadful danger to Nevada forever and ever, amen, to borrow a line from a tune.

But alarmingly, that’s not exactly what Shimkus was getting at. To him, as well as the Trump administration and others in Congress, the ideal thing is to revive the task and begin delivering numerous lots of the most fatal radioactive waste across the country and into Nevada.

This month, during discussion on the House floor, Shimkus led an hour of speeches to lobby his associates in assistance for Yucca costs. Shimkus and his abettors are calling for $167.7 million to resume licensing of the task. If they get their method, the financing would be consisted of in the omnibus costs bill set to be released in coming weeks.

To their credit, numerous Nevada lawmakers reacted immediately with declarations that amounted to shouts of “Not now, not ever.”

” There are design flaws that the (Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s) own analysis shows will cause radioactive waste leaking into the water level and transportation strategies would ship more than 70,000 metric tons of hazardous waste by train and truck through 329 congressional districts for several years to come,” said Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev. “Now, some of my coworkers are pushing legislation that makes this bad task even worse by breaking the caps on the quantity of allowed waste to be kept, increasing the danger and invalidating any current studies.

” If the proponents of Yucca Mountain and their market donors are major about resolving the issue of hazardous waste storage, they would follow heaven Ribbon Commission suggestions and pass my consent-based bill instead of discarding hazardous waste into a state that does not produce it and does not desire it.”

As Titus concluded, “Nevada is not a wasteland.” Bravo to her and others who are trying to prevent the similarity Shimkus from turning the state into one.

The frustrating majority of Nevadans have actually been against the task because it surfaced in the mid-1980s. And with great factor– actually, lots of good factors.

As Titus explained, the transportation strategy calls for extremely radioactive waste to be transferred by truck and train throughout 22,000 of miles of trains and 7,000 miles of highways, raising the threat of a mishap or an attack that would expose Americans to lethal levels of radiation.

In Las Vegas, the transportation path would cut literally through the heart of the city, consisting of on train tracks that basically run together with Interstate 15. Thinking about that the product is so poisonous that there would be measurable levels of radiation within a half-mile each method of the tracks– from waste in extremely protected containers, no less– a mishap or attack might be devastating for the neighborhood.

Then there’s the proposed dump website itself, simply 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Due to its geology and its location in an area prone to seismic activity, there’s an inherent danger of radiation dripping into groundwater materials and into the environment through fissures. And how unsafe is this waste? Ten years after being gotten rid of from an atomic power plant, it would still produce a lethal dosage of radiation within 70 seconds to someone standing near it, unshielded. It will stay radioactive for countless years.

That stated, so as not to alarm anybody, it is necessary to explain that the proposed funding does not pose an imminent risk of the task being built. One, it’s a drop in the bucket for the funding had to build out the project– nearly $100 billion over the next 100 years. 2, it likely would not even cover the expenses of the licensing, which the Federal Government Responsibility Office has actually approximated at $330 million. The GAO also forecast that the process would take 5 years.

But the movement by Shimkus is certainly a hazard. For Nevadans, the Illinois Republican politician has actually long been a combination of Darth Vader and a Terminator robotic. He’s determined on turning Nevada into a disposing ground, and he simply keeps coming.

We ‘d motivate readers to let him understand precisely how Nevadans feel about the task, and to share their comments with the Sun for possible publication in an upcoming edition. Here’s how:

To contact Shimkus

– Washington, D.C., office: 202-225-5271

– Email webform: shimkus.house.gov/ contact

– Mail: 2217 Rayburn Home Office Complex, Washington, DC 20515

Editor’s note: Shimkus states on his congressional site that he is “not able” to respond to anybody outside of his district.

To share remarks with the Sun

– Email: [ e-mail secured]

– Mail: Ric Anderson, Las Vegas Sun, 2275 Corporate Circle, Henderson, NV 89074

Historic Nevada divorce house may be moved for redevelopment


Scott Sonner/ Assocaited Press This Thursday, March 8, 2018 photo shows the Nystrsom Guest House pictured in downtown Reno, Nev. The house is among two historical houses a developer wants to transfer for a revitalization task. Built in 1875, it was among the first boarding homes accommodating divorce-seekers who helped make Reno the “Divorce Capital of the World” throughout the 1930s because of its lax residency laws.

Sunday, March 11, 2018|3 a.m.

RENO– Two historical homes that depend on the path of its revitalization project in downtown Reno, including one that played a crucial role in the city’s development in the 1930s as the “Divorce Capital of the World,” will be relocated, not taken down, if a designer has its way.

Officials for Jacobs Home entertainment Inc. state they want to protect the 2 houses on the National Register of Historic Places so they’re seeking authorizations to move them instead of turning to the wrecking ball.

The Nystrom Visitor House worked as a divorce boarding home during a time when divorce-seekers gathered to Nevada from around the United States because of its lax residency requirements. More than 32,000 divorces were given in Washoe County from 1929 to 1939, a time when the county seat, Reno, had a population of about 18,000. By the late 1930s, the county was balancing 5,000 divorces a year.

Jacobs Entertainment CEO Jeff Jacobs stated in a declaration today they intend to apply for city demolition allows because property moving falls in the demolition classification. However he said it’s part of their moving plan connected to the plan for a $500 million arts, residential and entertainment passage on West 4th Street to be called the Fountain District.

” We acknowledge how important it is to the community to preserve Reno’s rich history and culture,” Jacobs stated. “We fully plan to keep the integrity of these structures as we progress with our moving efforts.”

The other developing the developer is looking for to transfer– the Borland-Clifford House, integrated in 1885– is among Reno’s oldest houses and among the only homes remaining in the area from the 19th century.

The business wants to begin moving it to personal property prior to completion of March, with the Nystrom Guest Home’s moving slated for this summer season.

A spokeswoman for the business stated it remains in talks with possible purchasers and movers who have requested privacy throughout the contract period.

Some critics would rather see your houses remain where they are.

” Moving isn’t truly a preferable conservation method. It’s a way of dealing with something that’s in the method,” local realty agent Barrie Lynn informed KTVN-TV.

” What makes this specific residential or commercial property so significant is its distance to downtown,” she stated.

Integrated in Reno in 1875, the Nystrom Guest Home began running as a boarding home catering to divorce-seekers by the 1920s. It became one of the most popular homes away from home for those aiming to establish the minimum six-week residency to get a divorce in Nevada.

The initial Gothic, wood-siding home now covered in stucco was constructed as the home of Washoe County Clerk J.S. Shoemaker. It changed hands several times in the 1920s and 1930s prior to it was bought throughout World War II by Victor and Estelle Nystrom, who moved from San Francisco particularly to participate in the divorce trade.

Currently noticing an increase in visitors to the area specifically to seek “quickie divorces,” state legislators cut Nevada’s residency requirement from 6 months to 3 months in 1927. And in 1931, Gov. Fred Balzar signed legislation that cut the duration from three months to 6 weeks.

Lied Institute for Real Estate Studies Issues Nevada Real Estate Market Update

The Lied Institute for Real Estate Research Studies at UNLV has revived its monthly Nevada Housing Market Update after a two-year hiatus. The report is packed with zip code-specific housing information and tracks market trends statewide on home rates, sales, foreclosures, and more.

“This housing report is special because we utilize transactional information for the entire state, down to the postal code, and translate it to useable details that’s easy to understand,” said Vivek Sah, director of the Lied Institute for Real Estate Studies.

The March 2018 report, released today, includes year-over-year trends through January 2018. By and big it shows an increase in existing single-family house costs statewide. Amongst the report’s findings:

Las Vegas new single-family home listings are reducing, while the average rate for new listings is on the rise. The average new single-family house listing in January 2018 was $372,000– the greatest given that February 2008.
Washoe County saw the biggest boost in existing home costs since January 2017 at 21 percent, with a $447,000 typical house cost this January.
The typical variety of days on the marketplace for single-family houses in both Las Vegas and Washoe Country have actually dropped more than 10 percent because January 2017. Since this January, homes invested an average of 94 days on the marketplace in Las Vegas, and 91 days in Washoe County.
Existing single-family home sales dropped a little over the previous year for the Las Vegas metro area and Washoe County; sales increased in Mesquite and Laughlin.

According to Sah, the strong growth in prices brings with it pressure– and subsequent decline– in the number of sales and listings.

“It’s a case of sell high and purchase high, which may deter some sellers in the market,” stated Sah. “At the exact same time, foreclosure sales have actually stopped by 70 percent or more in the single-family residential market due to strong economic gains throughout the whole state.”

The month-to-month report pulls from existing MLS and public records.

The Lied Institute for Real Estate Researches is within UNLV’s Lee Business School and was established in 1991 to foster property education, research study and advance property understanding in Nevada. The institute produces appropriate and timely property research, supports educational programs in property for students and specialists, and provides neighborhood outreach. Learn more at unlv.edu/business/lied-institute

Report Download: Access the full Nevada Housing Market Update for January 2018

Cautions blanket Nevada as winter storm gains strength


Randy Pench/ The Sacramento Bee by means of AP

Heavy winds blow snow as Ryan Foster, 25, scrapes snow from his cars and truck in the parking area where he lives at the Donner Top Lodge in Norden on Thursday, March 1, 2018, near Donner Top, Calif. A significant winter storm swept south through California on Thursday, bringing heavy snow and strong winds to mountains and steady rain somewhere else, while triggering necessary evacuations for seaside areas to the south that were devastated by lethal mudslides in January.

Thursday, March 1, 2018|9:10 p.m.

RENO– All Nevada remains under hazardous weather cautions, watches and advisories including an unusual blizzard warning at Lake Tahoe, winter storm cautions in northeast Nevada to the Utah line and a high-wind alert in Las Vegas.

As much as 5 feet of snow is possible in the upper elevations of the Sierra around Tahoe by late Friday, where more than a foot of snow fell Thursday and schools were closed on the lake’s north shore in Slope Town and Truckee, California.

Whiteout conditions closed almost 100 miles of U.S. Interstate 80 for a number of hours west of the Nevada-California line and chains or snow tires were needed Thursday night on all significant highways over the mountain passes.

The blizzard warning remained in impact for the Tahoe location until 4 a.m. Friday, when the heaviest snow is anticipated with wind gusts possible in excess of 100 miles per hour. A winter season storm warning continues there up until 10 a.m. Saturday.

“Travel will be tough to difficult,” the National Weather condition Service said Thursday afternoon.

“In some locations, road closures, damage to some trees and power lines is likely. Be gotten ready for considerable decreases in visibility to near zero sometimes, especially in greater elevations … You might be stuck in your lorry for many hours,” the service said.

In Reno and Carson City where rain and light snow fell Thursday, a winter season weather advisory is set to end at 10 a.m. Friday. But a storm warning continues till Saturday afternoon in north-central and northeast Nevada. The National Weather condition Service says more than a foot of snow is anticipated in the Ruby Mountains near Elko.

In Southern Nevada, a high-wind warning continues till 4 a.m. Saturday from Pahrump and Beatty, to Pioche, Caliente and Panaca near the Utah line.

A wind advisory continues until 4 a.m. Saturday for the Las Vegas area, where Clark County health authorities have actually released an air quality alert for Friday due to the possibility of raised levels of blowing dust in winds gusting up to 50 miles per hour.

UNLV, Desert Research Institute Partner to Help Nevada Researchers Commercialize Discovery

In an ongoing effort to link Nevada’s cutting-edge research and innovations with industry, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) has hired the help of its veteran neighbor and partner at UNLV.

A brand-new partnership in between DRI and UNLV’s Workplace of Technology Transfer is enabling faculty and students to utilize each other’s skill and resources to foster new research cooperations and change technologies and innovations into new services and products.

The very first successful item of the new collaboration is a commercial licensing contract for Cumulus Weather condition Solutions LLC, a DRI-born startup business that develops weather decision support group for the wind and solar energy markets. Craig Smith, Ph.D, a DRI assistant research professor who established the intellectual property behind the company, has more than 15 years of experience in mathematical weather forecast and establishing weather data solutions for the next energy economy.

“We are really delighted to boost out collaboration with UNLV,” said DRI President Kristen Averyt. “Realizing the contribution of research study to the brand-new Nevada economy is satisfying a key DRI top priority. Partnerships like this will assist our scientists browse the commercialization pathway to make a genuine distinction for standard and emerging industries in Nevada, and beyond.”

The partnership likewise aligns DRI and UNLV in their efforts to support Nevada’s brand-new economy and assistance strengthen economic development and diversification throughout Southern Nevada.

“UNLV has actually made major strides in its economic development activities in recent years, and signing up with forces with DRI was a natural next fantastic step,” said Zach Miles, UNLV’s associate vice president for economic advancement. “This collaboration develops a new combined front that supports the commercialization of both organizations’ innovations and draws in additional industry-sponsored research study, student opportunities, and inter-institutional collaborations.”

UNLV technology transfer and financial advancement personnel help with the university’s process to bring discoveries and inventions to the market. The workplace becomes part of the UNLV Department of Research and Economic Advancement.

DRI is an acknowledged world leader in examining the effects of natural and human-induced ecological modification and advancing innovations targeted at examining a changing planet. With campuses in Reno and Las Vegas, DRI serves as the non-profit ecological research arm of the Nevada System of Higher Education.

Cliven Bundy speaks to Independent American Party of Nevada


L.E. Baskow Cliven Bundy answers a few more questions following an interview in front of Metro Police Headquarters on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.

Friday, Feb. 23, 2018|6:12 p.m.

SPARKS– Southern Nevada rancher and state’s rights activist Cliven Bundy is bringing his brand name of politics to an event of like-minded conservative libertarians in Northern Nevada.

Bundy, 71, was set to give the keynote speech Friday night at the Independent American Party of Nevada’s state convention in Stimulates where lots of consider him a hero. He invested nearly 23 months in jail before a federal judge in Las Vegas dismissed a criminal case last month against him and 2 of his kids stemming from an armed standoff with federal government agents at his Bunkerville cattle ranch in 2014.

Joel Hansen, chairman of the Independent American Celebration of Nevada, said before the speech that Bundy’s story is among “significant guts and faith” withstanding federal “corruption and tyranny.”

The celebration, which concentrates on state and property rights, includes numerous disaffected, former Republicans. It now has 65,000 active signed up citizens in Nevada– up from about 15,000 in 2002. It’s presently the 3rd biggest political party in Nevada, making up about 4.5 percent of the active citizens.

Shortly after his release from prison last month, Bundy and his boy, Ryan, appeared at a “Liberty and Property” rally in Montana sponsored by the Coalition of Western Residential Or Commercial Property Owners.

Numerous of the Independent American Celebration’s leaders have actually been associated with legal disputes with the U.S. federal government just like Bundy’s dating to the 1990s.

In 2001, the celebration staged a charity event to cover legal costs of a Nevada rancher, Cliff Gardner, whose livestock were seized for cannot pay grazing fees on national forest land in northeast Nevada. Its 2002 Nevada gubernatorial candidate, David Holmgren, waged his own battle with the BLM over his livestock in central Nevada.

The United States Bureau of Land Management began assembling Bundy cows in April 2014 after obtaining court orders accusing Bundy for 20 years of failure to pay more than $1 million in back grazing fees and penalties to the federal government.

The ensuing standoff at the Bundy ranch 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas pitted about 3 lots greatly armed federal agents safeguarding corrals in a dry river bed versus hundreds of flag-waving protesters calling for the release of some 400 cows.

Andy Kerr, a longtime ecological activist and consultant in Oregon, is amongst those outraged that Bundy cattle are still grazing within the limits of the Gold Butte National Monument President Obama designated in 2016 about 90 miles (140 kilometers) northeast of Las Vegas.

“Now without the threat of federal criminal prosecution, the Bundy young boys are getting some speaking gigs to tell their story, extol how they beat the feds and how they are continuing to do so by not paying federal grazing costs,” Kerr composed on his Public Lands Blog on Friday.

But he stated there may be a silver lining for conservationists.

“‘The more the Bundyites spread their bunk about the illegitimacy of the federal public lands … the more the overwhelming majority of Americans remember they love America’s public lands,” Kerr stated.

Attack on solar undermines Nevada’s future

Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018|2 a.m.

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There’s no concern that Nevada has extremely taken advantage of the increase of solar power innovation. Solar energy is clean, eco-friendly and easy to harvest– and Nevada is blessed to have no shortage of sunlight. The solar industry has actually grown over the last few years, now using 8,371 people statewide (7,031 of whom reside in Clark County)– the 4th most in the nation and the second most per capita. Nearly 95 percent of solar tasks in Nevada are in the setup, sales, circulation and project development sectors, all of which greatly depend upon the availability of economical photovoltaic panels. Veterans hold approximately 12 percent of Nevada solar tasks.

Throughout his State of the Union address, President Donald Trump declared completion of the so-called war on “beautiful, clean coal.” But what concerns me are the new attacks on renewable energy that have actually emerged over the past year under this Republican-controlled Congress and White Home.

Last month, the Trump administration slapped a damaging 30 percent tariff on imported photovoltaic panels, a negligent move that threatens a $28 billion market that depends on parts made abroad. Nevada’s solar industry is bracing for job losses.

This isn’t the first time Trump has actually undermined tidy energy to safeguard the revenues of his allies in the fossil fuel market. The administration is proposing deep budget plan cuts to the Energy Department’s renewable energy and energy-efficiency programs. Trump wishes to slash this clean energy research funding by more than 65 percent, from the present $2 billion to $696 million.

Instead of reinforcing a growing industry where we could be a global leader, Trump seems to be trying to broadly undermine clean energy to preserve out-of-date fossil fuels. This agenda comes at the expense of the American individuals’s health and the strength of our economy.

If the White Home continues down this course, we run the risk of losing good-paying Nevada jobs and slowing our state’s transition to clean energy. For years, we have combated to diversify Nevada’s industries to construct a more sustainable and durable economy. Solar is helping us with that fight in Nevada.

In Congress, I have safeguarded solar energy to secure the economic and ecological future of Nevada, and I will continue to do so. I am co-sponsoring two expenses that will reinforce solar energy: the Community College Energy Training Act and the Green Bank Act.

The Neighborhood College Energy Training Act would establish a program for labor force training and education in sustainable energy at community colleges. The Green Bank Act would create a National Green Bank that provides funding support to local, state and municipal green banks to money tidy energy and energy effective jobs.

Efforts to establish green banks have actually gotten assistance from leaders in both parties. In 2015, Gov. Brian Sandoval signed legislation developing the first-ever Nevada Clean Energy Fund. The single biggest barrier for green bank growth is an absence of access to capital, making a national green bank essential to support local and state green banks, like Nevada’s.

I’ve seen firsthand the remarkable savings that solar power can produce. As the former president of Parish Ner Tamid in Henderson, I assisted lead a group to construct of among the largest solar setups by a nonprofit in Southern Nevada through a public-private collaboration. With our solar project, we slashed energy costs by as much as 70 percent a year

Solar innovation is going to drive Nevada’s tidy energy future, and this administration has to get out of the way or work with us to support this market. We need policies in Washington that help Nevada accelerate our transition to solar, not slow us down.

Jacky Rosen represents Nevada’s 3rd Congressional District in the House of Representatives.