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Autopsy: Tom Petty passed away of unintentional drug overdose

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=” Image”/ > Owen Sweeny/ AP Minor passed away October 2 at age

Friday, Jan. 19, 2018|6:55 p.m.

LOS ANGELES– Tom Petty’s family states his death last year was because of an accidental drug overdose.

His spouse and daughter launched the outcomes of Petty’s autopsy via a declaration Friday on his Facebook page. Dana and Adria Petty state they got the results from the coroner’s office earlier in the day that the overdose was due to a variety of medications.

The declaration was published minutes prior to the Los Angeles coroner’s office issued its main findings, which verified that Petty had a range of medications, consisting of fentanyl and oxycodone, in his system.

Petty struggled with emphysema, a fractured hip and knee issues that caused him discomfort, the household said, but he was still devoted to exploring.

He had simply wrapped up a trip a few days prior to he passed away in October at age 66.

The family stated Petty had been recommended numerous discomfort medications for his wide range of problems, including fentanyl spots, and “we feel confident that this was, as the coroner discovered, an unfortunate accident.”

They added: “As a household we recognize this report may spark an additional discussion on the opioid crisis and we feel that it is a healthy and needed discussion and we hope in some method this report can save lives. Many individuals who overdose start with a genuine injury or simply do not comprehend the strength and fatal nature of these medications.”

Petty was a rock super star with the personality of an everyman who drew upon the Byrds, Beatles and other bands he worshipped as a boy in Gainesville, Florida. He produced classics that consist of “Free Fallin’,”” Refugee “and” American Lady.” He and his long time band the Heartbreakers had actually recently completed a 40th-anniversary tour, one he hinted would be their last.

The shaggy-haired blonde rose to success in the 1970s and went on to offer more than 80 million records. He was loved for his melodic hard rock, nasally vocals and down-to-earth design. The Rock-and-roll Hall of Fame, which inducted Petty and the Heartbreakers in 2002, applauded them as “durable, resourceful, dedicated, pleasant and unpretentious.”

Keeping in mind Tom Petty, an initial American badass

Last Christmas, my partner offered me Total Excess, a book of photographs by Michael Zagaris. It’s a pretty uninspiring collection of stock-quality rock photos, but one picture made me linger: Tom Petty, on the balcony of San Francisco’s Miyako Hotel in the late ’70s. He’s leaning against the wall and throwing some hip, thumbs hooked on the waistband of his slim jeans. That feathery hair is caught completely the breeze, and that singular mouth– that rubbery, Cheshire maw– looks loaded and primed for damage. What struck me most, though, wasn’t the image’s colossal coolness. It’s that, in some way, I ‘d forgotten Petty was a total badass.

When Petty dropped dead previously this week, we were all surprised, and not simply by the horrific news still unfolding from the night before. In addition to the shock and the unhappiness, there was genuine guilt surging through my Facebook feed, like we ‘d just lost an old friend we had not hired years. We ‘d all had that moment with Damn the Torpedoes, however then Minor ended up being the most constant, unpretentious, least self-important rock star in history, and we observed him a little less as time went on. “His music was everywhere,” one buddy published. “So I took him for granted.”

Recalling, he was never not there: the Stevie Nicks duet (“Stop Dragging My Heart Around”), the string of MTV classics (have Gen-Xers ever really recuperated from the cake-cutting minute in “Do not Happen Here No More”?), the Dylan trips, the Traveling Wilburys, the mega-selling omnipresence of Moon Fever, his first album sans Heartbreakers. “American Lady” turned evergreen, scoring whatever from Fast Time at Ridgemont High to Silence of the Lambs. It likewise motivated “Last Nite,” the very first single from The Strokes, who earned Petty’s respect by admitting they ‘d flat ripped it off. “That made me laugh aloud,” Petty informed Wanderer. “I was like, ‘OK, helpful for you.'”

If Petty’s influences are easy to trace– since I didn’t truly pay attention to The Byrds up until 1990, you can understand why my preliminary response was, “They sound just like Tom Petty!”– determining his impact on others is harder, just because it’s so huge. The ’90s oozed with Petty-ites. The Gin Blossoms and Soul Asylum. Sheryl Crow and Kid Rock. Do not forget Lucinda Williams and Ryan Adams and their alt-country ilk, practically whatever that’s come out of Nashville in the past two decades, the really presence of The War on Drugs. Even punks like Paul Westerberg tipped their hats. Prior to R.E.M. became the embodiment of crossover integrity, Petty proved you might make ridiculous videos and have enormous radio hits without offering your soul. It assisted that he didn’t take himself too seriously. Anyone who viewed The Larry Sanders Program understood Petty had a fantastic funny bone.

Back in 1979, when Zagaris went to photo Petty for Wanderer, he brought along a portfolio of other acts he ‘d shot: the Stones, The Who, Lou Reed, Zeppelin, Bowie, Clapton, Dylan. While looking through it, Petty said, “Wow, hopefully at some point we’ll remain in there, too.” It goes without saying that Petty earned his seat in the pantheon. You have actually probably got a Petty tune stuck in your head today. And if the man’s badass-ness slips your mind, that’s okay. Petty didn’t desire us calling him a badass, anyway. Which, naturally, just made him more of one.

Tom Petty, down-to-earth rock super star, passes away at 66

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Chris Pizzello/ AP In this Oct. 2, 2007 file image, singer Tom Petty gets to the world premiere of the documentary “Runnin’ Down a Dream: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers” in Burbank, Calif. Petty has actually died at age 66. Spokesperson Carla Sacks states Petty died Monday night, Oct. 2, 2017, at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles after he suffered cardiac arrest.

Released Monday, Oct. 2, 2017|10:06 p.m.

Updated Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017|1:52 a.m.

Tom Petty, an old-fashioned rock super star and everyman who brought into play the Byrds, the Beatles and other bands he worshipped as a kid and produced brand-new classics such as “Free Fallin,’ “Refugee” and “American Woman,” has died. He was 66.

Petty died Monday night at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles a day after he suffered heart attack at his house in Malibu, California, spokeswoman Carla Sacks stated.

Petty and his longtime band the Heartbreakers had just recently completed a 40th anniversary trip, one he hinted would be their last.

“I’m believing it might be the last journey around the country,” Petty told Wanderer in 2015. “We’re all on the behind of our 60s. I have a granddaughter now I wish to view as much as I can. I don’t wish to spend my life on the roadway. This tour will take me away for four months. With a youngster, that’s a great deal of time.”

Typically backed by the Heartbreakers, Petty broke through in the 1970s and went on to sell more than 80 million records. The Gainesville, Florida, native with the shaggy blond hair and gaunt features was enjoyed for his melodic acid rock, nasally vocals and down-to-earth design. The Rock-and-roll Hall of Fame, which inducted Petty and the Heartbreakers in 2002, praised them as “resilient, resourceful, hard-working, likeable and unpretentious.”

“I’m stunned and saddened by the news of Tom’s passing, he’s such a substantial part of our musical history, there’ll never be another like him.” Eric Clapton composed in a statement.

Petty’s albums consisted of “Damn the Torpedoes,”” Hard Guarantees” and”Full Moon Fever,”although his first No. 1 did not come until 2014 and “Hypnotic Eye.” As a songwriter, he focused often on day-to-day struggles and the will to overcome them, many memorably on “Refugee,” “Even the Losers” and “I Won’t Pull back.”

“It’s sort of the classic style of a great deal of the work I’ve done,” he told The Associated Press in 1989. “I believe faith is very important simply to get through life. I think it’s really crucial that you think in yourself, firstly. It’s an extremely difficult to thing to come by. However when you get it, it’s vital.”

Petty didn’t simply sing about not pulling back, he lived it. In 1979, he was enraged when his record label was offered and his contract moved. Stating that he would not be “purchased and offered like a piece of meat,” he self-financed what became “Damn the Torpedoes” and declared bankruptcy instead of allowing his label, MCA, to launch it. He ultimately reached a new offer with MCA, for better terms. In the early 1980s, he was again at war with MCA, this time over the label’s plans to charge additional money, a dollar higher than the standard $8.98, for his album “Tough Promises.” He again prevailed.

Petty was both an artist and obsessive fan, one who met his youth heroes and lived out the dreams of countless young rock fans. He befriended Byrds leader Roger McGuinn and became close to George Harrison, who carried out on “I Won’t Back Down” and joined Petty, Bob Dylan, Roy Orbison and Jeff Lynne in the unscripted super group the Taking a trip Wilburys. Minor inducted Harrison into the Rock Hall in 2004; two years previously Dylan’s son Jakob inducted Petty. In the 1980s, Petty and the Heartbreakers supported Bob Dylan on an across the country trip.

He would speak of being taken in by rock music since youth, to the point where his daddy, whom Petty would later on state beat him savagely, thought he was “mental.” Awed by the chiming guitars of the Byrds, the melodic genius of the Beatles and the snarling lyrics of Dylan, he was surprised to discover that other kids were feeling the exact same way.

“You ‘d drop in some other kid whose hair was long, this was around ’65, and go, ‘Wow, there’s one like me,'” he informed The Associated Press in 1989. “You ‘d go over and talk and he ‘d say, ‘I have actually got a drum set.’ ‘You do? Excellent!’ That was my whole life.”

By his early 20s, Petty had actually formed the group Mudcrutch with fellow Gainesville locals and future Heartbreakers (guitar player) Mike Campbell and (keyboardist) Benmont Tench. They soon separated, however reunited in Los Angeles as the Heartbreakers, joined by bassist Ron Blair and drummer Stan Lynch. Their eponymous debut album came out in 1976 and they quickly built a large following, fitting quickly into the New Wave sounds of the time.

The world altered more than Petty did over the previous few years. In 2014, around the time he received an ASCAP Creators Award, he told The Associated Press that he considered himself as “type of a music historian.”

“I’m constantly interested in the older music, and I’m still always discovering things that I didn’t learn about,” he said. “To be honest, I truly probably spend more time listening to the old stuff than I do the new things.”

Report: Tom Petty dead at 66 after going into cardiac arrest

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP From left, Jeff Lynne, Tom Petty and Dhani Harrison perform “I Won’t Pull back” at the MusiCares Person of the Year tribute honoring Tom Petty at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017.

Monday, Oct. 2, 2017|1:34 p.m.

Tom Petty, the long-haired rocker whose famously nasal voice was behind some of rock’s biggest hits, died Monday after going into heart attack, CBS News verified.

The “Free Fallin'” singer, 66, was found unconscious and not breathing in his Malibu home, and was subsequently taken to the UCLA Santa Monica Hospital, where he “had no brain activity,” inning accordance with TMZ.

Here’s more from the New York Daily News: