Tag Archives: prohibited

Should phones be prohibited from classroom? One Las Vegas school thinks so

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Todd Anderson/ The New York Times

Meagan Strickland, 13, utilizes her iPhone 4s and a school-owned iPad 2 throughout a history class at New Smyrna Beach Intermediate School in New Smyrna Beach, Fla., Jan. 11, 2013.

Monday, Feb. 12, 2018|2 a.m.

Going to a performance or show where phones aren’t enabled is ending up being prevalent– but it isn’t really simply artists who are asking for phone-free areas. One Las Vegas school is phasing in phone-free class with the help of a business called Yondr. Founded in 2014 by CEO Graham Dugoni, Yondr is an easy concept that helps people break the cycle of continuous media stimulation and help them in engaging with the real life, all by simply locking up their smart devices.

Sierra Vista High School Principal John Anzalone had actually spent months brainstorming the best ways to curb student mobile phone usage in class, but it wasn’t till he visited Chris Rock carry out standup that he discovered a solution.

“Each month we have conferences where instructors concern me and each month it was the exact same thing: cellular phones,” Anzalone said.

Per Chris Rock’s demand, the show needed that the audience lock their phone in a Yondr case before going into the venue. If a visitor required their phone for any reason, they could leave the theater and swipe the case versus an unlocking base to recover it. “So I’m sitting there through the show and I’m so engaged. I’m not fretted about who’s texting me, I’m not inspecting social media, I’m not examining basketball ratings, and I take a look around and no one is taping the show,” Anzalone says.

He left the program and understood that Yondr might be the option at school, too. The principal drifted the concept to a handful of instructors and instantly acquired five sets to pilot the devices.

“Within two weeks they were the hit of the school,” Anzalone stated. “Numerous kids said, ‘I have not paid this much attention in class because the third grade.’ That gave me chills, since as a principal, this is my No. 1 job, to obtain trainees throughout the phase.” He admits that for the first couple of days, trainees didn’t understand what to do without a mobile phone by their side. “They were unsteady almost,” he said. “It actually revealed the dependency that these phones offer to kids.”

Now, Yondr is being utilized in 20 class at Sierra Vista, and 8 other high schools will begin evaluating the program this year, according to a Yondr representative. As for Yondr’s creator, Dugoni states it’s his way of helping people preserve significant moments– and absolutely nothing could be more meaningful than an education.

“For me, I didn’t think link culture contributed to actual learning,” the CEO states. “It’s type of impossible to do if you have gadgets everywhere.”

Dugoni isn’t versus the technology, he says, we just haven’t established the right social structure for handling such widespread cellular phone use.

“If you take a look at what a mobile phone does, it’s tough to resist,” Dugoni states. “It’s hyper-visual stimulation and it’s tough not to look. Any tool you use throughout the day every day, it’s definitely going to pattern your nerve system … Individuals used to smoke on airplanes and now we go of course you cannot. Smart devices are truly significantly new, so the best ways to deal with all the implications are [likewise] brand-new.”

Whether it’s at a concert, at work or at school, many people appear to agree that phone-free spaces are becoming more needed than ever. It’s “a way for individuals to temporarily disconnect, a way for people to have some element of privacy and for artists to be genuinely uninhibited,” Dugoni states. “Our company believe it’s all kind of part of the next wave.”

For additional information on Yondr, check out overyondr.com.

Quick Take: Censorship and Prohibited Books Week

Every year, hundreds of books in libraries throughout the nation are challenged for material that some deem questionable or inappropriate. The American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Flexibility reported a 17 percent increase in the variety of reported book censorship problems in 2016.

Librarians like Amanda Melilli, head of the Teacher Advancement and Resources Library at UNLV, remain vigilant in the fight versus censorship. In honor of Prohibited Books Week (Sept. 24-30), Melilli goes over the function of libraries in the fight versus censorship, equipping teachers with tools to engage varying perspectives and concepts, and her own favorite “banned books.”

What is Prohibited Books Week and why is it crucial?

Banned Books Week is an event of intellectual freedom; the ability of people to check out and pursue whatever details they need or want. It’s a time to assess the censorship cases of the previous year and raise awareness of the importance of not limiting access to details. A number of us presume that book bannings are a distant memory, but difficulties and the elimination of books from libraries and schools still occur regularly. How common is it today for a library to receive difficulties to books on its shelves?

It’s relatively hard to determine since numerous obstacles go unreported. In 2016, the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom recorded 323 challenges; nevertheless, it is approximated that 82-97 percent of difficulties are never reported.

Additionally, some libraries are more vulnerable to challenges than others. Academic libraries, which deal mostly with adult populations, have a dramatically lower variety of obstacles each year than public or school libraries. When individuals or groups request that books or other materials be removed from library collections or a school’s curriculum, it’s generally due to the fact that they feel that the content is not appropriate for children or young adults. This is evident in the book challenges statistics for 2016 with 49 percent of obstacles happening in town libraries, 30 percent in schools, and 20 percent in school libraries. In addition, there is significant pressure on some librarians to self-censor collections and not collect anything that might be considered “questionable.” In the 2016 School Library Journal Controversial Book Study, nine from 10 school curators reported not purchasing a book for their collection because of potentially questionable subjects– the leading three factors being sexual material, blasphemy, and LGBTQ content. We have to support our teachers so that they can develop diverse and significant collections for everybody without fear of effects.

What function do libraries and librarians play in making sure users maintain access to books some may consider questionable?

Libraries are for everybody! They are safe places for individuals to gain access to information that they may not have the ability to access anywhere else. It is our professional responsibility to make sure our collections fulfill the needs of the communities we serve and not censor our collections based upon the what individuals consider to be proper. This suggests that libraries will have materials that some people will not agree with, but we are here to protect and advocate for the flexibility to pursue info without judgement. This is especially real for kids and young people, whose positions in society as minors significantly prevents their ability to access information. Nobody must be able to decide exactly what books are or are not appropriate for other people to check out; that choice is for each of us to make for ourselves, and libraries are here to support the details requirements of individuals. Exactly what are some of your favorite “banned books”?

There are a lot of! Some of the more typically challenged books that have actually had the most influence on me as a person would be The Things They Brought by Tim O’Brien, Fun House: A Household Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel, Cherished by Toni Morrison, and Their Eyes Were Viewing God by Zora Neale Hurston. Nevertheless, it should be kept in mind that these are some of my all-time favorite books that just so happen to be regularly challenged, and I think lots of other readers out there would also find their preferred books on the most challenged lists. Why is it essential to expose ourselves to different concepts or perspectives that might be included in controversial books?

I think we need to initially be careful of using the term “controversial books” due to the fact that exactly what one person sees as controversial, another person would see as being totally reasonable. The majority of challenged books are being labeled “questionable” only due to the fact that they contain content that some individuals and groups think is not acceptable for other groups, however this does not imply that these titles aren’t developmentally suitable for their target audience.

At our yearly Banned Books Buffet occasion where students get a possibility to engage with challenged books, the most typical reaction is amazement that a few of their favorite books have actually been challenged. We do a great deal of research study on private books to figure out why somebody found them offensive. Although a book may be challenged, it does not mean that its content is widely thought about controversial. Accessing materials with different ideas and viewpoints is a vital part in assisting us grow as people. Books allow us to experience the world and varied perspectives regardless of the restrictions of our everyday lives. They help us construct our identities and offer us a safe place to engage with the world.

In kids’s literature, there’s an example that there are mirror books and window books. Mirror books offer us even more viewpoints on ourselves and supply validation as people. Window books enable us to look into the lives of individuals who are different from ourselves and assist us establish empathy for others. The problem with limiting access to particular books is that it is all at once rejecting someone their mirror and others their window; one book can indicate many different things to different individuals. As head of the Teacher Advancement & & Resources Library, you help current and future teachers get ready for their time in the class. How does the library prepare educators to deal with censorship?

The main way that we help is by establishing information literacy skills in our current and future teachers. Finding impactful kids’s and young adult materials to fit the requirements of private PreK-12 trainees and class is a complex process that requires educators to be skilled researchers. They need to not just identify particular books from the thousands of brand-new titles being released each year but also evaluate them for appropriateness and effectiveness for their students. This consists of having the ability to articulate and justify the reasoning behind their options.

It’s tempting to believe that there is a short list of books that will work for every trainee and every class, however that’s simply not the case. Each group of trainees will be different and react to individual books in a different way. Helping our educators to be thoughtful, reflective researchers will better place them to defend their classroom material options.

We also work vigilantly to provide education on censorship and the value of battling against it so that our educators are much better informed on the intricacy of censorship in schools. This is seen through events like the Banned Books Buffet and our constant emphasis on the importance of varied children’s and young adult literature being integrated into the PreK-12 curriculum. Although Banned Books Week is simply one week, we talk with our teachers year round on censorship concerns through our library direction sessions or presentations at events like the Gayle A. Zeiter Kid’s and Young Adult Literature Conference. We’re here to support Las Vegas educators, to assist them find the info and resources that they require, so that they can offer the very best support and instructional experiences to their own students.

Uber says motorists and passengers prohibited from bring weapons

Friday, June 19, 2015|5:31 p.m.

New York City– Ride-hailing app company Uber says it is banning its riders and motorists from bring guns.

Uber Technologies says it is prohibiting guns of any kind throughout rides organized through the Uber platform, and drivers or riders who break the policy might lose access to the platform. The guidelines also put on Uber’s affiliates.

The company stated Friday it altered its guns policy on June 10 to ensure riders and drivers feel comfortable. In a statement, Uber stated it made the modification after evaluating feedback from both passengers and Uber drivers. Previously it had accepted regional law on the issue.

San Francisco-based Uber lets travelers summon automobiles through an app in more than 250 cities worldwide, and the independently held company is valued at around $40 billion. However it’s faced legal and regulatory obstacles as it expands in the United States and abroad. It has also been slammed over the thoroughness of the background checks it does on motorists and other security issues.

In April, an Uber motorist with a concealed-carry license shot a 22-year-old guy who had actually opened fire on a group of pedestrians in Chicago. Court records state the man was contending pedestrians who were walking in front of the Uber motorist’s vehicle, and the driver shot the gunman. The motorist wasn’t charged, as prosecutors stated he acted in defense of himself and others.

Rival Lyft also has a “no weapons” policy. According to Lyft’s site, if a motorist or rider is discovered to have a weapon in a Lyft car they’ll be disallowed from the platform despite regional laws on weapons possession.