Tag Archives: readies

The freshly engaged Whitney Cummings readies for the Comedy Cellar

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Monday, Sept. 17, 2018|2 a.m.

Everything is different now for Whitney Cummings. The comic has always used being single, dating and the misadventures of her romantic life as fodder for her standup act and writing. But earlier this month she got engaged. Now what?

“I got a little nervous. Should I give up funny now?” she says. “But then not even Two Days later on I already had a lot of ideas for new jokes, I believed, this is terrific for stand-up. I need to have done this earlier.”

You probably won’t catch many engagement jokes if you see Cummings make her debut at the Funny Cellar Las Vegas this week because she likes to home in on her writing prior to she tests brand-new funny ideas on a live audience. But they’re coming. The genuine concern: Is her fiancĂ© ready?

“I believe he knows what he signed up for,” she states. “The craziest thing is he’s never seen me do stand-up live prior to. I figured I ‘d get the ring initially and after that let him come. He saw my last HBO special however never live. I have a few jokes about him and yeah, he’s going to feel it. But individuals who understand me know I don’t conceal anything and I’m certainly not going to stop just because I’m getting married.”

Cummings is touring now in preparation for a brand-new TELEVISION special, her very first for Netflix, which is scheduled for filming in November. The Funny Cellar programs are significant since she values the diverse audience a performer can discover just in Las Vegas, and because the original Comedy Cellar in New York is her favorite club.

“When they said they were opening in Vegas I believed, what a cool thing to do. I generally dip into the Venetian or at bigger venues so I’m actually thrilled to really see individuals in the audience,” she states. “And since I’m dealing with the unique and changing the order of things every night, individuals will get to see an operate in progress and a smaller area is better for that. Plus I get to see everybody’s puke on their shirts and how unpleasant everyone will be having lost a bunch of cash. There’s absolutely nothing better than a closeup on somebody who simply lost their life savings.”

She’s kidding. However she’s major about the material, which doesn’t involve any political jokes or Trump talk.

“I’m proud to say this is an hour with definitely no politics in it. No one is going to get set off so you can feel safe concerning this show,” Cumming says. “It’s so hard to escape today, so I inform individuals if nothing else, you’ll get a rest from that for a while. Especially when you remain in Las Vegas, you don’t wish to need to consider the apocalypse. It’s a safe location where you can LOL and get intoxicated.”

Whitney Cummings will carry out at 7 and 9 p.m. September 17 and 18 at the Comedy Cellar at the Rio (3700 W. Flamingo Road, 702-777-2782) and more info can be discovered at comedycellar.com.

For developer of North Las Vegas job, activism readies business

Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018|2 a.m.

View more of the Sun’s opinion area

For more than 50 years, Moctesuma Esparza has actually viewed the progress of racial equality from a front-line position.

In 1968, he played a leading function in arranging a series of student walkouts at East Los Angeles high schools to require equality for Hispanics in Southern California’s public education system. The demonstrations have been credited for helping launch efforts across the country to accomplish social justice for Hispanic Americans.

Five years later, Esparza stays associated with activism and social work as the head of Maya Cinemas, which builds movie theaters in low-income areas. His company’s $75 million, 14-screen cinema in North Las Vegas is under construction and is set up to open late this year.

Esparza also is a movie manufacturer whose credits include the popular movies “Selena” and “Gettysburg,” together with a 2006 HBO documentary about the 1968 demonstrations. In event of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Esparza will present a screening of the documentary, entitled “Walkout,” at 6 p.m. Tuesday at North Las Vegas City Hall.

Throughout a recent interview with the Sun, Esparza discussed his local task, his individual history and used an optimistic message about the future of American social justice. Modified excerpts of the discussion follow.

What interested you in Southern Nevada?

I have actually been trying to find communities that are underserved from a home entertainment perspective, where people need to drive beyond their neighborhood to go see a motion picture or to have a quality, sit-down household supper. I found that there, communities in practically every population center had actually been bypassed, where advancement had gone to the suburban areas and the inner cores of these cities were now underserved.

I saw that as both an opportunity from a service viewpoint, and as a chance for civil service.

You’ll have a lot of competitors for movie-goers. Exactly what makes your theater an excellent fit?

A lot of it is area, due to the fact that there aren’t any theater nearby. And we offer quality and worth– our movie theaters would be comfy in the most upscale part of your valley, without a doubt. We show everything everybody else reveals, and we do it first-run. We take on (the significant cinema companies) and we do extremely well.

Let’s discuss your history of social activism. How did it begin and how did it evolve?

My father was 49 when I was born, so I grew up being dealt with almost like an adult. He had discussions with me that were substantive, so I got his view of the world and an understanding of exactly what social oppressions had actually taken place. So his heroes became my heroes, that included Francisco Vacation home, Emiliano Zapata, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Teddy Roosevelt, the designers of the Mexican Revolution. These were all individuals who were effective in transforming the world and who had a social conscience.

What were some early examples of your activism?

I was blessed because I came under the tutelage of a priest named Dad John Luce, who was a remarkable man and had committed himself to civil service. He presented me to the United Farm Worker Union and Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, and he drove a group people to Delano (Calif.), where I took part in the historical march in 1965 from there to Sacramento. I likewise participated in the picketing of Safeway shops when they were bring grapes that were non-union.

What was your development from there?

I finished from high school in 1967. There were 300 trainees in my school when we started. One hundred fifty graduated. Only four went to a four-year college, and that was the highest number at that time at my school.

There were merely no individuals who were university-educated experts to speak of as role models to Mexican-American trainees in the 1950s and 1960s. I discovered that just 2 percent of Latinos went to college at that time, while the number for Anglo-Americans had to do with 40.

So I commence accompanying others to discover what our community considered it.

We discovered that individuals knew what was happening to them, but they accepted it because they didn’t believe there was an alternative.

Which caused the walkouts.

The students would take their grievances to their principals and their principals would disregard them, and they would go to the school board and they would neglect them.

The trainees this time said, “No, we’re going to close down the schools.”

What have been the greatest strides ever since?

In lots of ways, they’ve come straight out of access to education. When I went to UCLA, there were 30,000 students, and I and a group of six or seven others who formed the first Mexican-American trainee group there counted every registration card. And we determined 40 Mexican-Americans.

Today, there are about 38,000 students at UCLA and about 9,000 Mexican-Americans and Latinos. There’s also an expert Latino class, which did not exist 50 years earlier. There are elected officials, including senators– something we never ever would have imagined.

Why have you maintained your commitment to advocacy as part of your company model?

It readies organisation. If people have a good experience and are respected, they go where they feel good. And that’s our goal: For everyone, no matter what their background, to have a great experience.

How are you feeling about the social environment today and the divisive rhetoric and policies originating from the Trump administration?

I have a viewpoint of having endured this before, and I take solace from that the country and its institutions are strong and will survive this.

It’s the arc of history that I count on– that Native Americans are not being annihilated, that African-Americans are not being shackled, that Mexican-Americans are not being eliminated for their land, that we are no longer segregated and everybody gets to vote. It may take a long period of time, however the arc of history is forward, towards the realization of human values.

'' Higher Education Readies Medicine''.

With his 6-foot-4 frame and flourishing voice, Tony Terrell looms big as he enters a room. It’s not hard to imagine him as a standout student-athlete, accumulating on-field accolades as he anchored the only offensive line in group history to produce back-to-back 1,000-yard rushes.

He bet UNLV 1999-2002, beginning in 40 straight games while dealing with his bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary research studies. He was the only two-time winner of the team’s Bill “Wildcat” Morris A lot of Inspiring Award and in 2002, ended up being the first UNLV gamer named a social work All-American as a member of the American Football Coaches Association Good Works Group. In 2002, he headed to the San Diego Chargers camp as a free representative.

But, even as he’s inducted into the UNLV Sports Hall of Popularity today, Terrell underplays his athletic achievements and concentrates on the student part of student-athlete. Today, as assistant director of learning assistance for UNLV’s Academic Success Center, he helps make sure all Rebels complete their degrees.

“I raise my playing profession (to students) just in the sense of conquering hardship,” he said. “I have an image of my termination contract with the San Diego Chargers as an added inspiration of how important education is. I’m aiming to strive to promote the significance of attaining things that cannot be taken away from you. College is one of those things where there’s a clear course to achieving something; whereas with the NFL, you can work out every day, do whatever practical to be successful, but still not make it.”

Once it ended up being clear he would not make it in the NFL, Terrell went back to UNLV to work as an undergraduate admissions employer and sold a football helmet for more graduation caps en path to a master’s of education in athletics in 2007 and a Ph.D. in sports education leadership in 2012.

“I earned the bachelor’s degree to make my mom pleased– I believed that was my zenith,” he said. “However the pursuit of innovative diplomas modifications you; it can alter your entire household tradition. There has to be that seed that’s planted, that belief, that trust, that this college medicine benefits you.”

Terrell speaks frequently to students about determination and brushing off labels that inhibit personal growth.

“I want to remove trainees’ opportunities or possibilities for reasons at not succeeding,” he stated, informing them that “‘the formula for success in college is best: Go to class, research study, use the resources available to you, and be disciplined. I can offer you the dish, but it depends on you to execute it and do exactly what it requires successful.'”

It’s not uncommon for students to approach him on school, influenced by their experiences from his classes. After making his Ph.D., he co-developed the first-year workshop course for the Division of Health Sciences and functioned as the coordinator/instructor. He’s also taught advanced-level kinesiology and weight-lifting classes, drawing from his days as a mentee of world champion powerlifter and strongman competitor Mark Philippi.

His playing profession required endless hours in the fitness center and passing up the vacation breaks that other students delighted in; he brought the very same discipline to working full-time prior to visiting night classes. “College has actually been transparent to me in the expectations.”

His expert career has provided him the platform to impact trainee lives, simply as his was altered by UNLV, he stated. He also contributes to a number of UNLV’s community service programs, such as the DASH program that feeds homeless individuals and Nevada Reading Week in primary schools.

“There’s no degree sheet for the best ways to navigate life,” Terrell stated. “It constantly seemed like I was working from a deficit, which’s where the competitive nature came from. I’ve seen the truths in my community, and I constantly wished to strive for greater than that. I was always told, ‘This is your ceiling,’ but whenever I used the formula of effort, devotion, and discipline, I broke through a perceived ceiling.”

Now, he said, “there’s no greater joy than seeing a trainee stand firm. The benefit in pursuing college is that you’re not going to be the exact same person … so pay it forward to somebody else.”