Tag Archives: training

Nellis Air Force Base pilot killed in training crash

Aircrafts are shown at Nellis Air Force Base in an undated image. (File) Aircrafts are shown at Nellis Flying force Base in an undated image. (File) Aircrafts are revealed at Nellis Flying force Base in an undated image.( File). LAS VEGAS( FOX5) -. A pilot from Nellis Flying force Base died in a

crash during training on Tuesday. According to a representative from Nellis Air Force Base, the crash happened Tuesday at about 6 p.m. at the Nevada Test and Training Variety situated roughly 100 miles northwest of the base.

The representative said a U.S. Air Force aircraft crashed while flying a training mission. The airplane was designated to Air Force Materiel Command.

Lt. Col. Eric Schultz died as a result of the crash, the representative stated.

An investigation into the crash is continuous.

Copyright 2017 KVVU (KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights booked.

Crowd anticipated for Golden Knights' ' training camp opener

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=” Image”/ > Mikayla Whitmore George McPhee, General Manager, Las Vegas NHL team throughout a revolutionary occasion to begin the construction of the Las Vegas NHL’s practice center in Downtown Summerlin on October 5, 2016.

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When the Golden Knights rookies take the ice today at City National Arena, there should be many on-lookers.

Hundreds of fans are expected for the Golden Knights initial training school, excitedly seeing the very first major league sports team in Las Vegas history get ready for their launching season.

More crucial, the players will be viewed by coaches.

Coaches from the team’s American Hockey League affiliate Chicago Wolves will run the camp. Head coach Rocky Thompson and assistants Chris Dennis and Bob Nardella will be evaluating every relocation the gamers make.

“They are being evaluated because this is the real offer now,” Thompson stated. “You’re here to make the Vegas Golden Knights, so you need to reveal what you have.”

The most essential set of eyes on the gamers this week, however, sits high above the rink peering down on them. General Supervisor George McPhee will remain in his perch, watching the team he developed from the ground up.

“The cool thing about this process is it’s still a blank canvas,” McPhee stated. “We have a lot of gamers here and they need to make themselves into a group. There are still opportunities here for people to earn full-time NHL jobs, specifically young guys who were suppressed in other places with people ahead of them.”

Without a lineup from last season to use as a beginning point, McPhee enters training school in a much different circumstance than the other 30 executives around the NHL.

“I personally am truly anticipating this type of training camp where we have to evaluate everybody based upon how they perform on the ice, how they bring themselves off the ice, and how they play in the video games,” he stated. “It’s different from anything else I have actually ever experienced.”

It’s rejuvenating for the players, who can with confidence feel they have the opportunity to make a lineup area or top-line minutes if they carry out well on the ice.

“We are completely unbiased about exactly what may establish,” McPhee stated. “We are expecting some unidentified surprises, but it’s wide open and it should be.”

Among the players who will draw the most attention is first-round selection Nick Suzuki, who will likely be headed back to his junior group for at least another year.

“I’m taking this chance as both establishing my game throughout my very first rookie camp, and I’m also truly aiming to flaunt what I’ve done this summertime and how I have actually altered my video game to fit the pro level,” Suzuki stated. “I certainly want to attempt to make the team however you never ever know exactly what is going to occur and I’m still a young man with a lot of years left in me to try to make the lineup.”

There’s no pressure on Suzuki, who simply turned 18 and is clearly in the long-lasting plans for Vegas. For other gamers, this camp can determine whether they have a future with the team.

“You’re going to see the level of strength rise since now it’s time to make the team,” Thompson stated. “Guys are here making impressions for the very first time with the season right around the corner.”

Thursday, the novices went through medical exams and everything worked out, McPhee stated. When it comes to the veterans, who begin camp Sept. 14, McPhee said everybody is expected to be healthy enough to start with the exception of James Neal.

Neal broke his hand throughout the Stanley Cup Playoffs (when he played for Nashville) and is still recovering, however McPhee said he would just miss a few weeks.

It’s been 14 months considering that the NHL granted Las Vegas an expansion group, however today for fans in the valley, hockey is finally here.

“The first day of camp resembles Christmas for a great deal of us in hockey,” McPhee stated. “It’s another new season and we will see where it goes and what fantastic things happen with our group and the game.”

Jesse Granger can be reached at 702-259-8814 or [e-mail safeguarded]. Follow Jesse on Twitter at twitter.com/JesseGranger_.

Experts In Training

Think of athletic trainers as the group behind the team. When a baseball gamer turns an ankle on a tough slide into second base or a football player has a neck spasm after a tough tackle, they turn to their group’s athletic trainers. Their job: Get gamers back into the video game.

Seattle Mariners assistant athletic fitness instructor Rob Nodine, ’92 B.S. Athletic Training, summed it up by doing this: “If the players are succeeding, that indicates we’re succeeding.” Fitness instructors, he added, “do not like to remain in the limelight.”

Nodine, and numerous other trainers in professional sports, learned how to do simply that through UNLV’s athletic training program, which has seen a minimum of 10 graduates worked with by professional teams in the last 12 years.

Dallas Cowboys physical therapist/assistant athletic fitness instructor Hanson Yang, ’09 M.S. Kinesiology, many commonly assists players come back from the collarbone fractures and shoulder dislocations. Neck injuries, he said, are the most challenging.Hanson Yang tapes a player's ankle.

” There’s not a lot we can right away made with a neck injury, so we ensure the gamer is OK first, “Yang said.”However exactly what’s most pleasing is when I deal with a gamer who has actually experienced a soft-tissue injury before halftime, then I get him into the locker room for some work and 15 minutes later on, he’s able to go out and play once again.”Likewise, Boston Red Sox assistant athletic trainer Masai Takahashi, ’99 B.S. and ’03 M.S. Sports Injury Management, is familiar with the aches and discomforts a hurler can experience throughout a 162-game season. He was a pitcher on his high school baseball team in Japan.”Most of the injuries I see are overuse injuries– tightness in the shoulders, back stress– due to the fact that the muscles get tight,” he said. “I attempt to capture tightness before it becomes an injury, so I do a lot of soft-tissue deal with gamers to keep their muscles loose.”

Pitchers are constantly his biggest difficulty. Practically no starter makes it through a season of 35 to 40 appearances tossing a baseball more than a hundred times a video game without feeling some muscle tiredness, Takahashi stated.

“If we can assist them make it through the season without going on the (handicapped list), that’s really pleasing for us.”

At UNLV, they all ended up being well trained in manual therapy, a method in which they probe for and deal with injuries with their hands. “There are things you can feel by hand that you won’t get in an X-ray or an ultrasound,” Takahashi stated. “Every athlete is various, and it’s important to not just find out the difference between each athlete, but how each professional athlete’s body feels from day to day. That method, you can be proactive and avoid injuries.”

“Every gamer has his own driving force,” Nodine stated. “We take note of players’ needs on a daily basis because knowing how injuries play into their psyche is crucial. Professional athletes want to keep playing at a very high level of efficiency, and they like it when we explain things to them.”Rob Nodine speaks with a player in the dugout.

Nodine, who served on the Expert Baseball Athletic Trainers Society’s executive committee from 2010-15, credited Kyle Wilson, UNLV assistant athletic director for sports medicine, for teaching him about the psychological part of athletic training.

Athletic training trainees usually invest early mornings in the class learning the fundamentals of healthcare, then deal with university teams in the afternoon to obtain important real-world experience. The routine has actually caused a first-time pass rate average of 98 percent on the national accreditation examination because 2010– well ahead of the three-year nationwide average of 81 percent.

“It’s common sense to understand that everybody handles pain and recovery various,” Wilson stated. “Two various baseball gamers might have the same injury, but they’ll react to treatment differently. That’s why it is very important to engage with professional athletes when they’re not hurt.”

After NFL Draft Day, Yang spent the summer immersing himself in discovering Taco Charlton and the Cowboys’ new recruits. He and his fellow fitness instructors developed exercise regimens for gamers at a series of mini-camps that will assist the coaches winnow down the hopeful NFLers to a final lineup of 53 gamers before the season begins.

The camps likewise give Yang an opportunity to build trust with the professional athletes he’ll be looking after all season. He asks about their families and lives beyond sports.

Yang had prepared a career in engineering until he shadowed a household pal tending to a sports group. “I never ever thought I ‘d get to this expert level,” Yang stated. “I appreciate my trainers, who taught me ways to establish an excellent relationship with athletes, and to truly understand that they are people, not just protocols. They offered me the opportunity to examine and develop treatments for patients, then offer me the self-confidence to use those skills on my own.

CCSD authorities detail bus chauffeur training procedure in wake of rollover mishap

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class=” photo” src=” /wp-content/uploads/2017/05/0504SchoolBusCrash01_t653.JPG” alt=” Image “/ > Steve Marcus Police and medical employees wait a Clark County School District bus after a mishap at Nellis Boulevard and Carey Opportunity Thursday, May 4, 2017.

Friday, Might 5, 2017|10:24 a.m.

Fatal School Bus Mishap Launch slideshow” Related content Motorists of school buses in the Clark County School District go through training

almost four times longer than state minimum requirements and double federal typical training time prior to being put on a route in the district. Transport officials said a 14-day bus chauffeur training program, that includes 35 hours behind the wheel and 40 hours of class training, helps the district discover the chauffeurs best suit Southern Nevada to transport students. Nevada law needs only needs 10 hours of behind-the-wheel training and 10 hours in the class, while federal averages stand

at about 20 hours for each.” If this isn’t really somebody we ‘d want busing our own kids, they will not be busing for anybody in the district,” stated Shannon Evans, the CCSD Transportation Director

at a media event this morning. On Thursday morning, a crash including a CCSD bus left 14 of 40

trainees on board and the chauffeur hospitalized with injuries. Police say a 70-year-old female owning a white Ford Taurus sedan went through a traffic signal at the intersection of Carey Opportunity and Nellis Boulevard, crashing into the bus and triggering it to turn over. The female was killed in the crash and a 10-year-old traveler in the sedan was hospitalized

in critical condition. “The other day was an extremely hard day for the district, “CCSD Superintendent Pat Skorkowsky stated. CCSD Cops Capt. Ken Young said City Authorities’s investigation into the crash was” ongoing.” Evans, a 24-year

CCSD worker, and Young, a 26-year CCSD staff member, said Thursday’s crash was the very first time in

their careers they have actually ever seen a school bus involved in a roll over crash.

FBI to carry out counterterrorism training workout at the Riviera

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Steve Marcus

12:13 a.m. – A view of the sidewalk in front of the Riviera Monday, May 4, 2015.

Friday, June 5, 2015|6:15 p.m.

. The FBI is pertaining to the shuttered Riviera resort soon, but not to go after any criminal activity.

FBI spokeswoman Bridget Pappas said in an email today that the bureau’s Captive Rescue Group will certainly perform a “routine training workout” in the location surrounding the Riviera. She couldn’t be reached instantly for more remark and didn’t offer other details, rather directing questions to an article on the bureau’s site with background details about the captive group.

According to that short article, the hostage group is the only full-time counterterrorism unit at the bureau, and it can respond within four hours to circumstances like terrorist attacks throughout the nation.

“Operators have the ability to fast-rope from helicopters, parachute with full objective equipment, and conduct sophisticated SCUBA strategies. They are trained to be remarkable marksmen, proficient in a range of breaching techniques– including explosives– and experts in close-quarter methods. Each operator’s skill and training guarantees that the HRT can launch assaults with speed, accuracy, and, if necessary, lethal force,” the FBI says of the hostage team.

So, if you see helicopters or any other indications of FBI activity around the Riviera in the coming days, do not worry. The 60-year-old equipment that closed last month is still safe– a minimum of until the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority gets rid of it to construct more convention space.