Tag Archives: treasures

Now is Nevada’s possibility to speak up and protect its nationwide treasures

Wednesday, March 21, 2018|2 a.m.

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When Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke came to Nevada last summer to examine the state’s 2 most recent nationwide monoliths– Gold Butte and Basin and Variety– he blew off essential stakeholders like regional Paiute people and then cut out after reducing a prepared two-day trip to one day.

About a month after Zinke made his brief fly-by, the Interior Department suggested lowering the monolith to “the smallest location compatible” to protect historical items and get rid of springs with water rights out of the monument location.

Justifiably, advocates for the monolith cried nasty, saying they didn’t get a chance to offer Zinke with a complete view of why the location should have complete federal protection.

Now, nevertheless, Nevadans have a chance to tell the Department of the Interior whatever they didn’t get an opportunity to tell Zinke.

The department is seeking public discuss the Bureau of Land Management’s proposed Southern Nevada District resource management strategy, a detailed document that will identify how a tremendous swath of public land in our area is stewarded.

Gold Butte becomes part of the district, so the resource management strategy process offers the general public its first opportunity to inform federal officials how they believe the location needs to be overseen.

It’s also a chance to reveal to the federal government that the monolith’s limits must be left alone. The Trump administration has not made a decision on whether to act on the Interior’s recommendation to diminish the location’s acreage.

Here’s hoping Southern Nevadans make the most of the chance to use their input on Gold Butte and other public lands in our area.

To help homeowners make their voices heard, the Sun today provides details from the Friends of Gold Butte advocacy company not just on ways to submit comments however ways to make them resonate with Interior officials.

We likewise provide a visitor column from a Southern Nevada entrepreneur who offers point of view on why protecting Gold Butte is important to the area’s economy and our quality of life.

Finally, we ‘d welcome commenters to share their remarks with the Sun for possible publication in a future edition. If you ‘d like to let the community know what you informed the BLM, please email a copy of your remarks to Ric Anderson, the Sun’s editorial page editor, at [ e-mail safeguarded], or send them by means of mail to Ric Anderson, Greenspun Media Group, 2275 Corporate Circle, Henderson, NV 89074.

To those sharing their remarks, we ‘d also encourage you to send us photos you have actually taken at Gold Butte. Pictures can be emailed or sent by mail to Anderson.

As the BLM weighs its management plan, the stakes are high for our area.

The plan will cover numerous uses of public land– leisure, agricultural, oil and gas expedition and more.

For Gold Butte, especially, complete federal security is essential. The monument is home to ancient Native American petroglyphs and other artifacts, sensitive native plants, at-risk wildlife such as bighorn sheep and desert tortoises, fossil track websites dating to millions of years ago, and some of the most awesome topography on Earth.

It’s likewise a centerpiece of the region’s efforts to expand its outside tourism industry, an essential piece of a more comprehensive effort to diversify the state’s economy and lower its reliance on gaming and resort tourist.

Simply put, Gold Butte is a treasure for our area– environmentally, traditionally, culturally and financially.

We owe it not just to ourselves to safeguard it, however to future generations and to those who stewarded it throughout countless years. Permitting it to be lowered or subjected to management practices that would put its environment or artifacts at threat is unthinkable.

Zinke might not have actually wanted to hear all that throughout his go to last summer season, however his department needs to know it now.

Lady who took pregnancy pictures swarmed in bees treasures valuable minutes with child

Emily Mueller, otherwise called the” Bee Whisperer” presenting while pregnant.( Source: Kendrah Damis Photography) https://kendrahdamisphotography.pixieset.com/emilymaternity-1/
Baby Emersyn Mueller's feet. (Source: Emily Mueller Facebook)< img src=" /wp-content/uploads/2017/11/15419831_G.jpg" alt =" Infant Emersyn Mueller's feet. (Source: Emily Mueller Facebook)"

title=" Baby Emersyn Mueller's

feet. (Source: Emily Mueller Facebook)” border =” 0″ width=” 180″/ > Infant Emersyn Mueller’s feet. (Source: Emily Mueller Facebook). AKRON, OH (WOIO)-. An Akron infant has passed away nearly 4 months after mother shared her pregnancy picture

shoot with 20,000 honeybees.

Emerysn Jacob Mueller was born upon and passed away on Nov. 11. Emersyn’s family had 24 Hr with him to produce an unique memory book with memento items, Mueller told Cleveland 19 News.

His parents, grandparents and brother or sisters; Cadyn, 11, Madelynn, 4, and Westyn, 2, will always have the memories thanks to the dramatic photo shoot that was shared around the globe.

The bees covered mama’s infant bump in her maternity pictures and the images went viral.

Emily Mueller said she wished to do something unique for the picture shoot and desired her passion for safeguarding honeybees to play a role.

Emily and her husband Ryan have actually been keeping bees for about five years.

Emersyn was Emily and Ryan’s 4th kid.

Download the < a href= "http://www.cleveland19.com/story/21951044/cleveland-news-app?clienttype=generic" target=” _ blank” > Cleveland 19 News app and Very first Alert Weather app. Copyright 2017 WOIO. All rights reserved.

50 Treasures for 50 Years: W.H. Bechtel Scrapbooks

Campus welcomed to celebration and display tour Thursday, Nov. 16.

School News| Nov 15, 2017|By

Peter Michel University Libraries’ “50 Treasures for 50 Years” display is now on display in the Lied Library. (Aaron Mayes)

The 50 Treasures for 50Years exhibition from the University Libraries celebrates the 50th anniversary of Special Collections and Archives. The display, on screen through December 2017, highlights the many collections housed in Special Collections and Archives that record the history of Las Vegas and Southern Nevada.

The school neighborhood is invited to an event for the exhibition at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16 at 2:30 p.m. in the Lied Library lobby.

Among the most popular items on screen is a leisure of a Bechtel Scrapbook, handmade by library staff so the general public to leaf through the image collection.

Huge and awe-inspiring, Hoover Dam brought in swarms of professional photographers to document its construction in the 1930s. The UNLV University Libraries Unique Collections and Archives houses more than 1,000 photographs of the construction from professional photographers working for the U.S. Bureau of Improvement or the “Six Business,” the consortium that constructed the dam. These photos record the progress and successful completion of this enormous federal agreement.

Ben Glaha, an employee of the Bureau of Improvement, photographed all aspects of the dam’s construction. His photographs were used in press releases, regulars, books, pamphlets, and slideshows to demonstrate that the dam was structurally sound and federal government funds were utilized sensibly. The 6 Companies wanted its own photographic record to highlight its function and employed Walter J. Luebke as the main photographer. His pictures were collected into a series of scrapbooks entitled “Photographic Record, Hoover Dam Project, 6 Business” and presented to numerous agents of the companies. Few of these scrapbooks survive undamaged.

The scrapbooks in Special Collections and Archives were designated “W.H. Bechtel Scrapbooks, volume one and 2,” although just one original cover endures and is titled as volume 3. This cover is gilt stamped and bears the name W.H. Bechtel, president of Bechtel Business, the leading partner in the Six Companies. Whether the scrapbooks were originally all consisted of in volume three, or if there were 2 other volumes– one including a series of loose pictures that were gotten rid of from a scrapbook– can just be speculated. Comparing the scrapbook to ones at Oregon State University, it is clear that each was separately put together with a different selection of photographs, mounting methods, numbering, and descriptions.