Tag Archives: whether

Lawmakers quarrel over whether tax bill assists middle class

Image

J. Scott Applewhite/ AP House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, left, pays attention to the committee’s ranking member, Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 8, 2017, as the committee started markup of the long-awaited plan by Republicans to reverse and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Monday, Nov. 6, 2017|4:52 p.m.

WASHINGTON– House Republicans and Democrats bickered heatedly Monday over whether the GOP tax expense really helps the middle class, as the Ways and Method Committee started a marathon session to change and vote on the far-reaching legislation President Donald Trump intends to sign into law by year’s end.

Republicans focused on findings by Congress’ nonpartisan Joint Committee on Tax that the expense would decrease taxes throughout all income levels over the next several years.

“Plainly this is assisting real people. It’s helping teachers, it’s assisting trainees, it’s assisting struggling families that are living income to income,” stated GOP Rep. Erik Paulsen of Minnesota.

Democrats returned consistently to a section of the analysis showing taxes would really go up starting in 2023 for some 38 million taxpayers or families making $20,000 to $40,000 a year.

“There are a great deal of people expecting a tax cut who would be big losers under this costs,” declared Democratic Rep. Costs Pascrell of New Jersey. “This is a joke and you’ve got to deal with up to it.”

At stake is whether the GOP will succeed in passing the most sweeping rewrite of the tax code in years, which would be a major accomplishment for congressional Republicans and Trump after a year largely without legislative wins. And expecting 2018 midterms where Democrats will aim to wrest back control of your home from the GOP, each side is trying to win the political debate over who is truly keeping an eye out for middle-class Americans.

The legislation adds $1.5 trillion to the ballooning national debt, provides a significant tax cut to corporations, and rescinds the estate tax, which would benefit a tiny portion of the wealthiest families in the nation. It likewise streamlines the loophole-ridden tax code by collapsing today’s 7 personal earnings tax brackets into 4, almost doubles the standard deduction used by people who do not itemize, and increases the child tax credit, a component promoted by first daughter Ivanka Trump.

Regardless of the various analyses, Republicans argued vociferously that the legislation is targeted toward the middle class.

“It has to do with making America’s economy stronger than ever by providing more tasks, fairer taxes and bigger incomes across the nation,” said Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas.

Brady is aiming to push the legislation through committee and to the complete House later on this week, and GOP leaders are going for House passage before Thanksgiving. Late Monday, he proposed additional modifications, including restoring a tax break for staff members who receive childcare benefits from their employers and restricting the bill’s effect on universities with big endowments.

The committee’s top Democrat, Richard Neal of Massachusetts, countered that the bill “puts the well-connected first while requiring millions of American households to see while their taxes go up.” He grumbled that Republicans crafted it in personal without input from Democrats.

The tax proposition is the very first major rewrite of the United States tax code in three decades. After embarrassing failures to make good on years of promises to reverse “Obamacare,” the tax expense is enthusiastically backed by Trump, Home GOP leaders and numerous rank-and-file Republican politicians, who are assuring an easier IRS code, a more globally competitive company tax structure, and tax cuts for the middle class and families with children.

However there’s significant uneasiness too. In addition to the overall boosts in later years for lower-income Americans, many earners in the upper-middle class, especially those from high-tax states, are dealing with tax boosts. That’s since the procedure would no longer permit taxpayers to deduct state earnings taxes from their federal taxes.

Effective lobbyists are combating to safeguard favored deductions, while a few well-financed interest groups, consisting of the National Association of Homebuilders, have actually already sworn to oppose the legislation. The homebuilders group has voiced concerns over Republicans’ decision to decrease the home loan interest reduction from $1 million to $500,000.

Las Vegas authorities set to choose whether to clamp down on celebration homes

Image

Steve Marcus A bird’s-eye view of a domestic area in

Monday, June 19, 2017|5:30 p.m.

. The Las Vegas City board on Wednesday will choose whether to put further restrictions on short-term rental houses. A recommending committee Monday early morning pressed the proposed procedure forward but was divided on whether to back it.

The questionable costs would need homeowners thinking about renting their homes for 30 days or less to get a special-use authorization in addition to the business license currently required by the city. It would likewise set optimal tenancy limits, restriction occasions and celebrations on the residential or commercial properties, and need rentals to be at least 660 feet apart from one another.

For homes with five bedrooms or more, a certified security company must be used to respond to problems within 2 hours.

Operators found breaking these terms would likewise be subject to a two-strike policy prior to losing their permit or license.

The intent is to crack down on so-called celebration homes and preserve lifestyle within property areas. Lots of citizens in communities near downtown and the Strip have actually spoken out in favor of the regulation, lots of sharing stories about finding pathways and backyards littered with used prophylactics and empty beer bottles after troves of travelers came down into their generally quietly neighborhood for all-night ragers.

However operators of short-term rentals say party houses are the norm which additional constraints will do nothing however penalize the city’s existing legal operators. Opponents to the proposed expense shared their own stories about how the earnings from their short-term leasing residential or commercial properties have actually helped keep their households afloat. They defined their typical visitors as families who wouldn’t pertain to Las Vegas without a nonresort accommodations option or visitors with nonpartying top priorities.

The Greater Las Vegas Association of Realtors expressed a neutral opinion on the expense, but kept in mind that it wishes to deal with the city to find alternative policy choices that much better balance the conservation of areas with the rights of homeowner.

The expense was heard last month by a three-person advising committee comprising Councilman Bob Coffin, Councilman Stavros Anthony and Councilwoman Lois Tarkanian, who presented the expense and has been its most singing champion. Tarkanian and Casket voted for a yes suggestion. Anthony voted versus it, calling it “ambiguous.”

After that conference, the expense was eligible to carry on to complete council to be voted on. However, due to overwhelming public interest, the city decided to hold another recommending committee conference to permit additional comments and issues to be heard.

That recommending committee, held Monday morning, was composed of Anthony, Casket and Councilman Ricki Barlow.

Anthony and Coffin maintained their previous positions.

“There are excellent objectives,” stated Anthony, “but if this passes absolutely nothing is going to alter. Absolutely absolutely nothing will alter.”

He mentioned that it has actually been approximated that roughly 5,000 short-term leasings are on the market in Southern Nevada, in spite of being banned in Henderson and unincorporated Clark County. Within the city of Las Vegas, an estimated 1,000 short-term rentals are being run. Only 150 are certified.

Platforms like Airbnb and VBRO have actually made it easy for people to list personal homes as alternative lodging. Such sites tell users to follow their regional municipality’s rules and policies however do little to no policing of that by themselves.

“My prediction is if this passes there will not be one special-use license application,” Anthony said. “They’ll just run under the radar. This particular costs doesn’t address the specific concern of exactly what are we expected to do with these party houses? … It simply throws more guidelines that will be disregarded anyway. The genuine concern is enforcement.”

Casket agreed that enforcement was crucial but thinks that tightening guidelines ought to go hand-in-hand with it.

“We have the ability to enforce,” he said. “We simply need to make the dedication. It’s possible to augment or change our spending plan for enforcement of our guidelines.”

He included, “In my ward, this has become a plague.”

Barlow chose not to make a recommendation, saying he needed more info about what it would take for the city to correctly enforce the regulation, must it be authorized by the full council. The committee instead voted to move the proposed expense to complete council without a recommendation connected.

The City board will go over and vote on the proposed short-term rental expense on Wednesday at Town hall, 495 S. Main St. The meeting will start at 9 a.m. and the short-term rental item has an arranged start time of 11:30 a.m.

. The city is anticipating hundreds to participate in and has actually designated overflow parking in the Symphony Park lot. A shuttle bus service is scheduled to run between 6:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Visitors can also walk throughout the pedestrian bridge from Symphony Park to the Town hall Garage, which lies across from Municipal government.

People who live closest to Yucca Mountain weigh in on whether to develop nuclear waste dump

Image

Steve Marcus

A view of Yucca Mountain, center, as seen from Amagosa Valley town workplaces Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015.

Monday, Sept. 7, 2015|2 a.m.

Revisiting Yucca Mountain
The road to Yucca Mountain is fenced off near Amagosa Valley Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015.Launch slideshow “

Click to enlarge photo

According to a recent report, water would carry radioactive product from Yucca Mountain to Amargosa Valley.

What’s next

Want to talk with nuclear regulators about Yucca Mountain? Authorities from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will certainly be in Amargosa Valley and Las Vegas to field public comments about the latest Yucca study.

– The very first is from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 15 at the Embassy Suites Convention Center, 3600 Paradise Road, Las Vegas.

– The Amargosa meeting will certainly be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Amargosa Community Center, 821 E. Amargosa Farm Road, Amargosa Valley.

The threats of transferring hazardous waste

It’s been said that roads and railway lead to Las Vegas. If Yucca were to open, some fear carrying hazardous waste through cities en route to the mountain, just 90 miles from Las Vegas, is courting disaster. The Energy Department in 2002 estimated 9,600 rail deliveries and 1,200 truck shipments to the website, going through such cities as Pittsburgh, Pa.; Cleveland; Kansas City, Mo.; and Chicago. If terrorists were to attack, or an accident were to occur, the department reported clean-up costs might be $10 billion.

The Senator and the President

With Sen. Harry Reid and President Barack Obama leaving office in January 2017, the anti-Yucca crowd is losing two of its strongest advocates. The 2 have maneuvered to remove financing for the program and promise that it will never ever be a truth. All Congress needs to resume the job is Energy Department approval and financing– two things that numerous Republicans believe they can get. After 40 years of argument, Congress in 2002 designated Yucca as the federal hazardous waste storage website and has actually invested more than $8 billion constructing and researching the project.

In her mobile home in the Timbisha Village in Death Valley, Pauline Esteves bears in mind the mushroom clouds and white light ripping across the eastern sky.

A long-lasting homeowner of the broken desert, she had a front-row view of many of the 928 above- and below-ground nuclear blasts that cratered the earth at the Nevada Test Website. The surges were her first connections to federal nuclear jobs– however not her last. Today, she worries the federal government will put a nuclear waste dump at Yucca Mountain.

The website was picked in 1987 to keep 70,000 tons of the nation’s spent nuclear fuel and other extremely radioactive waste 1,000 feet under the mountain’s surface area for at least 10,000 years. The design consists of 40 miles of tunnels that would house waste in corrosion-resistant containers. It has actually considering that been defunded, however some political leaders have actually not abandoned the idea of reviving it.

As the crow flies, Yucca Mountain sits 30 miles from the homeland of Esteves’ Timbisha Shoshone People. In August, the Workplace of Nuclear Product Safety and Safeguards at the Nuclear Regulatory Committee launched a study claiming that if Yucca were operational, groundwater would carry a percentage of radioactive waste into the close-by town of Amargosa Valley and– if conditions were right– into tribal lands in Death Valley. The task would require congressional approval, something that retiring Sen. Harry Reid promises will never occur.

However with Reid’s upcoming retirement, and the possibility that President Barack Obama might be changed by a Republican more friendly to the job, the possibility that the Yucca Mountain project might progress seems higher than ever.

With that in mind, we invested a scorching day in late August in the area, conference with activists, a retired nuclear engineer, a chosen authorities and daily people. To each, we postured the very same concern: What do the people who stay in the shadow of Yucca desire?

– – –

The Funeral service Mountain range divides Nevada’s Amargosa Valley from California’s Death Valley– but the two locations share many markers of desert life: bad mobile phone service, severe temperature level swings, no health centers, few cops and, most importantly, a complex relationship with atomic weapons and nuclear power.

On one side are people like Esteves. At 90, she is a tribal senior and an anti-nuclear activist dating to the 1960s. Esteves happily remembers her civil disobedience– cat-and-mouse altercations with federal security service providers and an arrest alongside Martin Sheen and 490 protesters rallying versus the test site in the 1980s. The desert is her home. “I feel lost when I am elsewhere,” she states.

For Esteves, rocks, water, plants and animals matter as much as people do. “I believe the land and everything that lives upon it are there to do excellent, not for radioactive materials,” she says.

Throughout the Gold Rush, Barbara Durham’s grandpa saw the very first white guys come onto the lands now referred to as Death Valley. Durham, who now functions as the tribal historical conservation officer, said her people when wandered easily in between Yucca and Death Valley, hiding from the heat while searching for food and water. They have actually lived there “forever.” Now her people owns 7,000 acres throughout a couple of patches of land. There are 400 members of the Timbisha Shoshone nationwide, of which 30 live in the village.

For her, a dump at Yucca runs out the question: “Who would want it in their yard?” she asks.

Ends up several individuals across the mountains in Amargosa would.

From 1962 to 1987, Ken Garey invested his professional life behind the fence, as a train engineer 10 miles east of Yucca at Location 25, transferring nuclear rocket engines. Today, he is an 87-year-old Nevada history buff. Putting on a belt fastening that checks out “Nevada Test Site,” he dreams of a future in which nuclear reactor change coal- and natural gas-fired plants– and of a waste repository.

The town’s chief employer is Ponderosa Dairy products. Gold mines and the ABC pulp mill have come and gone. College graduation rates are low and the town has a few of the lowest income levels in the state.

Though the Longstreet Inn and Casino is the home entertainment center for the town, no clients are drinking or betting there in the late afternoon. Customers may have been drawn to its only competitors, the Location 51 Travel Center, which boasts a restaurant, filling station and brothel.

For the blue-collar ladies working at Longstreet, a nuclear repository could turn their sleepy facility into a hot ticket. “Yucca would be outstanding,” said Karen Gilligan, a waitress.

In his modest office that doubles as a storeroom, Mike Cottingim, the Amargosa Valley town manager, surrounds himself with mementos of Nevada’s nuclear past, including faded 2-foot-wide pictures of the mountain and the NASA-like interiors of the spent fuel center. However he does not need to be reminded exactly what the mountain appears like– he can see the peak 12 miles from his window, simply over the hood of his pickup truck parked outdoors.

“There is no one thing that can save Amargosa,” he says. “However Yucca, that thing, is going to drive a great deal of other things.” For Cottingim, the financial benefits outweigh the drawbacks. Even if disaster strikes, Cottingim isn’t stressed. “You got ta go sometime,” he states.

For their neighbors to the west, that’s an affront. “Amargosa just got right here,” Esteves says.

– – –

Standing at the wire mesh fence that blocks the access roadway to the repository website, Yucca towers above an evasive geological landscape, where look doesn’t always match reality.

Though it’s called a mountain, it’s more of a ridge. Formed by volcanic activity that began 15 million years ago, the peak marks the meeting point of 2 faults. The Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects puts the annual opportunity of an earthquake there around 1 in 70 million.

Though it’s in the middle of a desert, indicators of water are all over. Above ground, parched washes and streams snake southward from ridges to coalesce in the basin where Amargosa Valley sits.

Thanks to underground water, a percentage of radioactive material would take a trip southwest through washes, canyons, aquifers, fault zones, tufts and an intermittently flowing river. From the repository, the water would press into Amargosa Valley and, if the upward pressure from pumping in Pahrump were ever to stop, from there into Death Valley.

According to the recent Nuclear Regulatory Committee report, the peak radiological dosage would be 1.3 millirems each year, which is far lower than the background radiation dosage– the natural quantity that is constantly present– of 300 millirems annually. Simply puts– not much. The report says the possible effects would be “small.” But that is, naturally, presuming an earthquake doesn’t rip open the repository, sending a much bigger dosage of radioactive material downstream.

– – –

The dispute over Yucca Mountain is fulled of dualities– a few of which revolve around jobs and cash.

Advocates state Yucca Mountain could raise to 4,500 jobs during construction and as many as 2,500 afterward, but those trying to obstruct the job contend those numbers are far lower. Clark County, which has actually passed a number of resolutions opposing the site since 1985, approximates that 1,500 irreversible jobs would be created.

A UNLV report stated Yucca could boost the economy by as much as $228 million a year throughout the peak of the building phase, and by as much as $102 million a year over the transport and operations stage. However opponents fret about home values and the loss of tourism dollars.

No matter the finances, some opposition is implacable. For Esteves, who lives in what the Shoshone call the Valley of Life, no amount of cash or jobs would change her mind.

“I have lived very inadequately and here I am, 90 years of ages and still alive,” she said. “If people took a look at exactly what the land truly indicates, they would safeguard it.”

Sandoval will certainly decide soon whether to look for Reid’s seat

CARSON CITY– Gov. Brian Sandoval stated Tuesday he will certainly be revealing “soon” his option on whether he will certainly run for Harry Reid’s U.S. Senate seat.

Sandoval stated he had actually decided not to even consider his political options while the legislative session was underway. With its adjournment Monday, Sandoval said he will now make his strategies understood.

National Republican politician authorities and U.S. Sen Dean Heller have contacted Sandoval to seek the seat being left by Reid. Reid is backing previous Chief law officer Catherine Cortez Masto as the Democratic nominee for the seat.

“There will be a choice forthcoming in the really near future,” Sandoval said. “I will let everybody understand soon.”

Sandoval repeated his previous comment about his existing position, saying it is the greatest job he might wish for. Sandoval was reelected to a 2nd four-year term as governor in a landslide in November. But he will certainly be termed out by 2018.

“I’m pleased of exactly what’s been accomplished and exactly what we’ve done,” he said.

Regarding exactly what is weighing on his decision, Sandoval stated: “You think of your family. You consider your obligations in your existing position.”

Sandoval said he has actually not been pressed to run, although there have actually been inquiries.

“I made it truly clear that I had not been going to speak to anybody as long as the session was (going),” he stated. “Honestly, I have not returned call. I was concentrated on the session and individuals have actually had a great outcome due to the fact that of that.”

Sandoval said that he is providing some thought about the 2017 session currently. With a tax policy in place, the next session should enable a focus on concerns aside from a “knock-down, drag-out” battle over the budget plan and taxes.

With Reid’s surprise statement in March not to look for another term, the open seat has drawn a great deal of attention from both Democrats and Republicans. Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., just recently announced she would not run for the seat however rather seek reelection.

Rep. Joe Heck, R-Nev., is considering a proposal for the seat.

Contact Sean Whaley at [email protected]!.?.! or 775-687-3900. Discover him on Twitter: @seanw801

Ben Vaughn: Appreciate charm whether wild or diligently organized

Image

“Fried Green Tomatoes” (1991) starred Mary Louise-Parker, Kathy Bates, Mary Stuart Masterson and Jessica Tandy as prim and correct Ninny Threadgoode.

Thursday, Might 21, 2015|3 a.m.

Click to enlarge photo

Kevin Costner as “Crash” Davis and Susan Sarandon as Annie Savoy in “Bull Durham.”

Food Network Star Ben Vaughn
The Food Network star Ben Vaughn.Introduce slideshow “

I was out walking in my neighborhood the other evening and discovered myself admiring the experienced green thumb execution in the yard work of a number of my neighbors. Throughout the street lives a real, genteel Southern woman, our own Ninny Threadgoode. Her garden is beautiful and very well purchased. Everything belongs.

Each plant is thoroughly pruned and completely organized so, from color, height, shade and light. It’s a horticulture symphony in continuous blossom, flowers, plants and herbs. A day does not pass that I do not see her out dealing with that organized masterpiece with the precision of a heart surgeon.

A couple of homes down, another next-door neighbor has an equally remarkable garden. But this next-door neighbor is certainly more of a totally free spirit. She is our Annie Savoy. Her garden grows wild with a number of varietals and colors. To the untrained eye, it might resemble a yard full of weeds well in need of a spray or 2 of Round-Up.

She shares plants with the next-door neighbors, placing tables out front with indications that read, “Take one.” Upon closer evaluation, you can see that she has thoroughly selected the plants in her lawn to offer something to nearby wildlife. Her lawn has in fact been called a habitat by the city.

These next-door neighbors share the same interest and gusto for gardening, but their expression comes out in 2 completely various methods. Both are gorgeous in their own way and are quite admirable. However, if you talk to either neighbor independently, you can inform that in their heart of hearts, they believe that the way they do it is the best way.

Whatever your choice, you know after speaking with both that they have a really clear understanding of the best ways to manage and control the plant types. They have achieved exactly what they set out to do with their plans. In spite of their distinctions, they have the core strategies and foundational understanding of gardening in common.

The mirrors of this into the culinary world are incredible. On one hand, you have these remarkable chefs on the world’s best list like Rene Redzepi (Nomo in Copenhagen, Denmark) who presents meals that have been diligently organized with every detail planned and every drop of sauce or sprig of garnish put so.

At the other end of the spectrum, you have chefs like Francis Mellman (Bodega Escorihuela in Mendoza, Argentina) who are more concerned that the food they present engages all your senses, maybe placing a mound of prepared meat apparently in a haphazard way on a plate.

Both chefs are incredibly passionate about the pursuit of producing fantastic flavor profiles and bringing individuals enjoyment through food, however they go about it in entirely various ways. The discussion of what is offered is night and day, from the visual to the tactile experience.

You can observe this across all innovative fields, from visual arts to performing arts– the contrast between those who pick the timeless and polished technique and those who diverged and cut a brand-new, less organized course.

Art is a best example. Take a look at the works of a realist like Diego Velazquez, then look at works of an abstract giant like Jackson Pollock. Artists will certainly produce a really compelling argument about why the style they chose is the utmost expression of creative belief. But, in the end, it is your experience as the viewer that eventually fulfills their intent.

The thing that is so interesting to me, in all of this, is that whatever the imaginative outlet, the real masters of any art have the very same standard understanding of strategy and fundamental basics. They are all masters of the exact same techniques, however it is how they utilize those strategies to express their visions that produce the range that we, as consumers, see.

Any artist worth his salt understands ways to stretch a canvas or which brush to use to make a particular stroke or which colors to blend to get the best cerulean sky, however it’s what they put on the canvas that sets them apart from the next man.

There will always be those who say that one style is better than the other or paramount. However the weight of each style is equally essential, and I can value the charm in both.

Some individuals may look at a painting of a realist and appreciate the minute information and recognize the painstaking effort behind every stroke as genius and appeal, while others may take a look at the same painting and say it is too apparent and draw no inspiration from it.

In the same vein, someone might look at an abstract painting and call it a mess of paints and colors put on a canvas, while another may take a look at the same piece and be entirely moved by exactly what the artist has interacted through the colors and passionate strokes of his brush.

It is the exact same with food, which is my true interest. Whether the plate is arranged with the accuracy of an architect, or the product appears to have been tossed on the plate, if the chef is really gifted and able to interact his vision to others, you will certainly see that there is believed and interest behind both meals– and I guarantee you can taste it.

Even the process of spraying a plate in a manner that appears to be haphazard to the restaurant can actually be a long and purposeful procedure. Or, in fact, the mere act of open plate distribution is the expression.

Trust me when I inform you that true chefs leave nothing to chance. There isn’t a single condition that hasn’t been thought about. In some cases the idea is orderly, and occasionally the meant expression is mayhem.

It is the enthusiasm behind both that drives the industry and feeds not only our bodies, but likewise our souls. Speak with a chef of either style, and it won’t take long to be drawn into their love for food, and it will end up being noticeable that what they are putting on the plate is truly an expression of themselves.

The plate you get at your table is the physical representation of that expression. They likely will not be standing beside you discussing each detail and why it exists the method it does– there’s no time at all for that– and ultimately it’s not the point. Your interpretation is the other half of this dance.

So, no matter what your preference, just keep in mind to value the charm you see, whether it’s wild and unchecked or carefully and meticulously arranged. It’s the enthusiasm and the love behind the food that you truly need to enjoy.

Ben Vaughn is a prize-winning chef and popular TELEVISION personality best known as a host for the Food Network. A food lover, family man and author, Ben’s most current book, “Southern Routes,” chronicles his journey to discover the very best dishes and restaurants from North Carolina to Texas. “Southern Routes” is published by HarperCollins and will certainly be released late summer. He has started shooting his brand-new TV series “Breakfast Club” right here.

Ben’s culinary career began in South Florida and thrived as he ended up being chef/owner of trendsetting and seriously well-known restaurants from Memphis to Atlanta. He’s received recognition from the James Beard Foundation and presently functions as CEO and cooking director for his restaurant group Fork Knife Spoon. Ben prepares to open the first of several non-Strip dining establishments this year starting with the debut of his Southern Cooking area.

Robin Leach of “Lifestyles of the Rich & & Famous” fame has been a journalist for more than 50 years and has invested the previous 15 years offering readers the within scoop on Las Vegas, the world’s premier platinum play area.

Follow Robin Leach on Twitter at Twitter.com/ Robin_Leach.

Follow Sun A&E Senior Editor Don Chareunsy on Twitter at Twitter.com/ VDLXEditorDon.