Texas law enforcement officer faces murder charge in teenager'' s death

Image

Tony Gutierrez/ AP A couple of hundred supporters stand holding lit candles as they listen to comments from speakers throughout a vigil for Jordan Edwards in Balch Springs, Texas, Thursday, May 4, 2017. The prosecutor’s office examining the death of the black teen who was shot by a Dallas-area law enforcement officer had once filed a complaint over that officer’s aggressive habits, according to records obtained Thursday by The Associated Press.

Friday, May 5, 2017|7:12 p.m.

DALLAS– A white Texas police officer has been accuseded of murder in the shooting of a black teenager for which the officer was fired, according to an arrest warrant released Friday.

The warrant for Roy Oliver, a former officer in the Dallas suburban area of Balch Springs, was provided by the Dallas County Constable’s Office for the April 29 shooting death of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards. He turned himself in Friday night at the Parker County Jail in Weatherford, Texas, about 95 miles west of Dallas, and his bond was set at $300,000.

In a statement it released Friday night announcing the warrant, the constable’s workplace mentioned evidence that suggested Oliver “meant to cause severe physical injury and commit an act plainly harmful to human life that triggered the death.”

Oliver fired a rifle at a car filled with teens leaving a party, fatally shooting Edwards. The teenager’s death led to demonstrations calling for Oliver to be fired and charged. On Tuesday, the exact same day that the officer was fired, news broke of the Justice Department’s decision not to charge 2 white policemans in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in the shooting death of a black guy in 2016. And a white officer in North Charleston, South Carolina, pleaded guilty that day to federal civil rights charges in the deadly shooting of a black male in 2015.

Edwards and his 2 brothers and 2 other teens were repeling from an unruly house party in Balch Springs late Saturday night when Oliver opened fire on their car with a rifle. The bullets shattered the front passenger-side window and struck Edwards. Oliver’s firing Tuesday was for breaching department policies in the shooting.

It took a couple of moments for Edwards’ 16-year-old bro, who was driving, and other guests to notice that he was plunged over in his seat.

The examination into the shooting “will continue and does not conclude with the arrest,” constable’s spokesperson Melinda Urbina stated.

Oliver’s attorney, Cindy Stormer, didn’t right away return messages seeking remark. The lawyer for the teen’s family, Lee Merritt, stated he would release a statement later on Friday.

Records reveal that Oliver was quickly suspended in 2013 following a grievance about his conduct while working as a witness in a drunken-driving case.

Personnel records from the Balch Springs Authorities Department gotten by The Associated Press show Oliver was suspended for 16 hours in December 2013 after the Dallas County District Attorney’s Workplace submitted the complaint. Oliver also was purchased to take training courses in anger management and courtroom disposition and testimony.

The personnel records likewise consisted of periodic assessments that kept in mind a minimum of one instance when Oliver was reprimanded for being “ill-mannered to a civilian on a call.” That assessment, dated Jan. 27, 2017, called the reprimand a separated event and advised Oliver to be conscious of his leadership role in the department.

The grievance from the district attorney’s workplace stated the office had a tough time getting Oliver to participate in the trial, he was upset he needed to be there, he utilized vulgar language that caused an assistant district attorney to send a female intern out of the room, and he used blasphemy during his testament.

“In an email from among the prosecutors he mentions you were a ‘scary individual to have in our workroom,'” then-Balch Springs Police Chief Ed Morris composed in the suspension findings.

Oliver joined the Balch Springs department in 2011 after being an officer with the Dalworthington Gardens Authorities Department for practically a year. A declaration from Dalworthington Gardens authorities on Wednesday included information of that and previous periodic employment as a dispatcher and public works employee between 1999 and 2004.

He got an award for “meritorious conduct” as a dispatcher and there were no documented grievances or disciplinary action in either his work as a public security officer or dispatcher, according to the declaration. Between his employment as a dispatcher and officer in the Dallas suburb, Oliver remained in the United States Army, rising to the rank of sergeant while serving 2 tours in Iraq and earning numerous commendations. He served for 2 years in the Texas National Guard reserves through 2012.

After the Dallas County Attorney’s Office complained about Oliver’s behavior, Morris suspended the officer for 16 hours, which Oliver finished by surrendering 2 sick days.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *