Unruly, '' disheveled ' guy subdued on jet heading to Hawaii

By JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER and MICHAEL BALSAMO
Associated Press

HONOLULU (AP) – A man on a Hawaii-bound flight referred to as rowdy and disheveled was suppressed by passengers and a flight attendant who used an aircraft beverage cart to obstruct him from getting to the front of the jet. He was then paralyzed with duct tape in a seat till the airplane landed in Honolulu Friday, escorted on the last leg of its journey by two fighter jets.

The guy on the airplane that left from Los Angeles was identified by police officials as Anil Uskanil, 25, of Turkey. He was apprehended after the plane landed.

Uskanil was also apprehended prior to boarding the flight at Los Angeles International Airport for opening a door that led onto an airfield ramp, according to Los Angeles Airport Police, who determined Uskanil.

He had actually been consuming, however authorities said he did not fulfill the requirements for being drunk in public, was given a date to appear in court on suspicion of misdemeanor trespassing and permitted to board.

Guests among the 181 flying on American Airlines Flight 31 staffed with 6 team members noticed Uskanil before the jet removed from Los Angeles.

Among the very first to board were first class travelers Mark and Donna Basden, who discovered a notebook computer in a seat pocket in front of them.

The couple, from Albuquerque, New Mexico, presumed somebody on a previous flight left it there however a flight attendant said it most likely belonged to a man who was in the bathroom.

A man Donna Basden described as a “disheveled looking fellow” emerged and Mark Basden provided him the laptop. The man scowled, took the laptop and opened it and closed it and then aimed to sit in another first class seat, Mark Basden stated.

The male “clearly kept an eye out of location” and was sent to the economy area of the aircraft after a flight attendant asked to see his boarding pass and informed him he would have to go to row 35 at the back of the airplane, Donna Basden said.

Halfway through the six-hour flight, the couple saw the very same guy once again holding his laptop computer with something over his head that they believed was a towel or a blanket.

“He was really peaceful, moving extremely sluggish. He was aiming to approach the cabin, like where the captain is,” said another passenger, Grant Arakelian.

At that point, a flight attendant diminished the aisle with her serving cart and blocked the entrance to first class, said traveler Lee Lorenzen, of Orange County, California.

“She jammed the cart in that the entrance and she just said, ‘You’re not can be found in here,'” Lorenzen stated.

The male pushed the cart, aiming to get through but travelers showed up behind him and grabbed him. He invested the rest of the flight limited in a seat with duct tape.

“This regrettable event highlights the incredible professionalism of American’s team members, and specifically, in this circumstance, our flight attendants,” American Airlines said in a declaration. “Their definitive actions made sure the security of everybody onboard the flight. We are proud of our crew and are grateful to them for their actions.”

Bob Ross, president of the Association of Specialist Flight Attendants, on Saturday said attendants who represent the last line of flight defense managed to “pacify a high-risk circumstance”

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly was informed on the midair disturbance, according to a statement from the department. There were no other reports of interruptions, however the department said it kept an eye on all flights Friday as a preventive step.

As Uskanil was suppressed, the cockpit called for assistance. Federal representatives were sent to wait on the plane and two F-22 Raptors from the Hawaii Air National Guard rushed to fulfill the airplane.

“We got that military escort entering into Honolulu,” Donna Basden stated with a laugh, “So welcome to Hawaii.”

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Balsamo reported from Los Angeles. Associated Press writers Andrew Dalton in Los Angeles and Audrey McAvoy in Honolulu added to the story, and AP Airlines Author David Koenig contributed from Dallas.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material might not be published, broadcast, reworded or redistributed.

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