USPS owes $3.5 million in royalties for using the wrong Statue of Liberty

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John Taylor/ Las Vegas Sun A Las Vegas variation of the Statue of Liberty outside the New York-New York on the Strip

Released Wednesday, July 4, 2018|2 a.m.

Updated Wednesday, July 4, 2018|4:43 p.m.

. A stamp that mistakenly included the image of a Statue of Liberty replica in Las Vegas rather of the initial New York Statue will cost the United States Postal Service $3.5 million in a copyright violation claim.

Las Vegas sculptor Robert Davidson, who developed the reproduction Woman Liberty in the exterior at the New-York-New York casino-resort on the Las Vegas Strip, took legal action against the Postal Service five years ago over its 2011 “forever” stamp style.

The stamp included the face of his Girl Liberty, which his lawyers argued in court filings was unmistakably various from the original and was more “fresh-faced,”” sultry “as well as”

sexier.” The Postal Service had actually been launching the stamps for a minimum of three months before finding it was not a picture of the New york city statue.

Postal Service attorneys argued Davidson’s design was too comparable for him to declare copyright.

Federal Judge Eric Bruggink sided with Davidson recently and agreed his work was an initial design with a more contemporary, womanly and contemporary face. He bought the Postal Service to pay $3.5 million to the artist– a slice of the $70 million the service made in make money from the stamp.

Postal Service representative Dave Partenheimer stated in an email that the firm was reviewing the decision and would comment “if when appropriate.”

Todd Bice, Davidson’s lawyer, stated in an emailed declaration that his customer was pleased that the court acknowledged the significance of his work.

” As the court noted, Mr. Davidson’s creative production of the Las Vegas Woman Liberty is highly special and appealing, which is exactly what prompted the United States Postal Service to select a picture of his work for the second ever Forever Stamp, over numerous other images,” he said.

Court documents reveal Davidson said he desired his sculpture, like the remainder of the casino-resort’s facade, to have the feel of New york city’s iconic horizon without replicating it.

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