Tag Archives: state

Settelmeyer prepares to seek GOP state Senate leadership post

Saturday, May 26, 2018|2 a.m.

State Sen. James Settelmeyer, R-Minden, states he prepares to look for the leadership role of the Republican Senate caucus for the 2019 session of the Nevada Legislature.

“I am choosing leadership, and we’ll have that vote after the election to identify who will be the best to lead us throughout the session,” Settelmeyer stated Thursday on Nevada Newsmakers.

Settelmeyer acknowledged he may be in a competition for the post with Sen. Ben Kieckhefer, R-Reno, who has actually been the assistant caucus leader. Settelmeyer likewise deals with Curtis Cannon, a Democrat from Carson City, in the general election in November.

State Sen. Michael Roberson, who has actually led the GOP Senate caucus because 2013, is running for lieutenant guv.

When inquired about leapfrogging Kieckhefer to be chosen leader, Settelmeyer stated, “It is not a concern of leapfrogging. We just have different leadership designs and various views on the future of the state of Nevada, possibly.”

Settelmeyer was first elected to the Legislature in 2006 as an assemblyman from Douglas County. He was chosen to the Senate in 2010.

Kieckhefer likewise was chosen to the Senate in 2010, having no previous legislative experience.

“When you look at it, I have more than 12 years in this procedure and in that regard, he in fact has less,” Settelmeyer said. “Possibly I’m the one who was leapfrogged.”

Settelmeyer stated he likewise may be more conservative than Kieckhefer.

“It is a concern of viewpoint,” he stated. “I originate from a rural neighborhood and I believe I simply have a bit of a various viewpoint on a conservative element.”

Nevada State College president evaluated at twice the legal limitation for DUI

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Bart Patterson Related news The president of Nevada State College had a blood-alcohol level well over two times the legal limit when he was jailed last month after striking a light pole in the vehicle he was driving, a court file programs.

In the file, Henderson police state President Bart Patterson stumbled and was slurring his speech when officers came to the scene near Warm Springs Road and Green Valley Parkway. The accident took place about 9:45 p.m. April 27 after Patterson participated in a charity function. Authorities said he informed officers he ‘d had two glasses of wine. Officers reported that he smelled highly of alcohol and that his eyes were bloodshot and watery.

After going through a field sobriety test, the document stated, Patterson accepted breathe test. The results revealed his blood-alcohol material to be 0.214, well above the legal limit of 0.08.

Patterson was apprehended on suspicion of intoxicated driving and failing to keep a driving lane, and was reserved into the Henderson Detention Center. Arraignment has been set up for June 4.

Patterson has been the leader of Nevada State College because 2011, serving for 6 months as an interim president before being named president in 2012. He got a contract extension in 2017.

Patterson, through the college, released a declaration stating, “I believed I remained in a position to safely drive, clearly I made the incorrect option and am enormously regretful.”

The Nevada System of College has actually revealed no formal disciplinary measures coming from the incident.

Sun readers compose in droves: State no to Yucca

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John Locher/Associated Press file Participants in a 2015 congressional trip of Yucca Mountain get in the task’s south portal. The website is near the Nevada town of Mercury, about 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

contact) Sunday, May 6, 2018|2 a.m. Associated content Not here.

Not now. Not ever. That was the loud-and-clear message from more than 100 Sun readers who responded to a current invitation to make their voices heard on the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

Readers who opposed the job surpassed supporters by a wide margin, while advocates were split between two general groups– those who believed the job must move on as developed and those who made their assistance conditional in some way, such as repurposing the center to recycle nuclear waste rather than keeping it.

Opponents mentioned numerous longstanding concerns about the job, including the possibility of seismic activity that could result in the release of radioactive material, and the risks positioned by carrying waste to the website on routes that would pass directly through Las Vegas.

Several longtime Las Vegas homeowners likened the possible risk of Yucca Mountain to the above-ground nuclear testing in the desert near the city throughout the Cold War.

A few select remarks:

” NO NO NO to discarding hazardous waste in our backyard. I will move. This is simply Donald Trump bullying Nevada since he lost here.”

” We have to be known for solar energy, not for the nation’s discarding ground for (nuclear) waste.”

” We truly feel if it is opened here, we will leave Nevada. We have a child and do not want him to mature with in an environment with Yucca Mountain open.”

” Nevada does not have any nuclear centers for our power, so why should the concern be on us to accept the nuclear waste from states that do benefit from nuclear power? Any state that has a gain from nuclear power should have the obligation of handling the residues of that power. None of us would dispose our garbage on our next-door neighbor. The exact same must use between states.”

” I accompany the lots of that believe transport to the area and the actual storage of hazardous waste has not been proven to be a safe option.”

Today, the Sun is publishing a bundle of Yucca Mountain-related content that consists of letters, an editorial and an editorial cartoon on the issue. The staying letters have been forwarded to the Nevada interim legal Committee on High-Level Radioactive Waste, whose require public remarks at an April 27 conference prompted the Sun to welcome readers to sound off on the issue.

Police state man in match pointed weapons, holed up in southwest valley apartment

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” 0″ src =” /wp-content/uploads/2018/05/16676540_G.jpg” width=” 180 “/ >( File). LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -. Las Vegas authorities were responding to a guy holed up in a house in the southwest valley on Wednesday night.

Lt. Baker of Metro authorities said about 7 p.m., a white male in his 50s, using a business fit and “hang badge,” was supposedly pointing guns at people in an apartment building on the 9900 block of West Katie, near Twain Avenue and Hualapai Way.

The guy disregarded authorities commands and entered into a home.

Officers were trying to make contact with him and ask the general public to prevent the location.

Copyright 2018 KVVU (KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights scheduled.

10-year-old boy found dead in clothes dryer was electrocuted, authorities state

(Source: Christina Rodriguez via KTRK/CNN)
< img alt="( Source: Christina Rodriguez via KTRK/CNN)"

title=”( Source: Christina Rodriguez via KTRK/CNN)” border= “0” src =” http://MEREDITH.images.worldnow.com/images/16651926_G.png?auto=webp&disable=upscale&width=800&lastEditedDate=20180430105743″ width =” 180″/ >( Source: Christina Rodriguez via KTRK/CNN). (Meredith)– A 10-year-old boy who died while concealing in a dryer at a Houston apartment building

was electrocuted, authorities stated. The Harris County Medical Examiner’s workplace launched an autopsy on Monday for Fernando Hernandez Jr.

. Hernandez was playing hide-and-seek with other kids at the apartment building on Friday, when he apparently climbed into the clothes dryer, located in the common utility room. When his friends and 9-year-old sibling found him, he was unresponsive.

The young boy’s mom, Christina Rodriguez, informed KTRK she saw him drinking water about Thirty Minutes before his body was discovered.” I don’t know exactly what occurred, “the tearful mother said.” I was just inside cooking, and my little kid came within and informed me my (other) child

was dead.” Paramedics carried out CPR before transporting Hernandez to the healthcare facility, where he was noticable dead.

Following the event, the apartment building shut down the laundry room until more notice.

Police are still investigating, but stated it appears to be an accident.

Grief counselors visited Hernandez’s school, Harris Elementary, on Monday. The young boy attended the school with his 3 brother or sisters.

” We try to stay strong for one another. The instructors do a really good task of that and provide the support that we can,” said Trent Johnson, the school’s assistant principal.

Details from KTRK through CNN added to this story.

Copyright 2018 Meredith Corporation. All rights scheduled.

Hundreds of Clark County instructors at risk of losing job, under 2015 state law

LAS VEGAS (FOX5) –

An obscure state law passed in 2015 might require hundreds of Clark County instructors out of a job. That’s unless they can spend for a costly class, required to keep their licenses.

The state provided instructors 3 years to comply. State law requires instructors hired in 2015 or later to take a ‘Household Engagement’ course. It’s offered at 11 universities, in-person or online.

The state law affects teachers from out-of-state, who don’t have a course-equivalent completed. The class can cost up to $1,400. It’s a concern that falls on teachers to pay.

“This is an issue,” CCEA executive director John Vellardita stated. “This is not some inconsequential issue.”

Educators have been scrambling to get back into the class. This time it was to sign up for a college course, needed to keep their licenses.

“Their expense cost can be anywhere from $700 to 1,400 to do it,” Vellardita stated.

It’s called the ‘Family Engagement’ course. Location universities have developed curricula to meet the state requirements.

“The idea – the intent behind it is actually excellent: to try to involve moms and dads and households of trainees being taught in the school system,” Vellardita said.

While it ended up being a requirement back in 2015, teachers have been concerned about its approaching deadline.

“We have actually heard as high as 900 in Clark County alone,” Vellardita stated. “There’s presently 450 jobs. You want to release 900. All of abrupt you have a significant crisis.”

He said the county counts on recruiting out-of-state, and it can not pay for to lose competent instructors.

“There’s a variety of educators that do not have this college credit, and what? We’re going to let them go? Not going to occur,” he said.

While Vellardita stated the course does have its benefits, the expense shouldn’t fall on instructors.

“I think there must be more of an investment on the part of the state and, or the district for a teacher to acquire these since that problem is pretty considerable,” he said.

With time running out, Vellardita stated he hopes the state will make emergency situation modifications to offer instructors a chance to comply.

“You don’t let 900 qualified, qualified, accomplished educators leave the door, especially when you have a crisis of shortage, because of this issue,” Vellardita stated.

CCSD delayed concerns to the Department of Education which did not right away have a response.There are already 450

open teaching jobs in Clark County. A state requirement passed in 2015 may force up to 900 more teachers from the system. That’s unless they can pay for a required’family engagement’ course to keep their licenses. Picture of courses offered: @FOX5Vegas pic.twitter.com/qhQvUGmXSl!.?.!— Tiana Bohner(@FOX5_Tiana) April 25, 2018 Copyright 2018 KVVU( KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

Inmate stabbed to death while on the phone in Ely State Jail

Sergio Chan, 29, was stabbed to death by two inmates April 18, 2018 (Nevada Department of Corrections / FOX5).
< img alt=" Sergio Chan, 29, was stabbed to death by 2 inmates April 18, 2018 (Nevada Department of Corrections/ FOX5).

" title=" Sergio Chan, 29

, was stabbed to death by 2 prisoners April 18, 2018( Nevada Department of Corrections/ FOX5).” border=” 0″ src= “/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/16567457_G.jpg” width=” 180 “/ > Sergio Chan, 29, was stabbed to death by 2 inmates

April 18, 2018 (Nevada Department of Corrections/ FOX5). ELY, NV( FOX5) – An inmate was stabbed to death in a Nevada prison on Tuesday afternoon, inning accordance with a release from the Nevada Department of Corrections. Sergio Chan, 32, was apparently on the phone when he was assaulted and stabbed numerous times by 2 inmates, Ely State Prison authorities said. Chan was treated by medical staff on the scene and transported to a medical facility where he later on passed away.

Chan was serving a 29 year sentence to life in prison for First degree kidnapping, sexual assault, two counts of break-in, 3 counts of conspiracy to dedicate violent criminal activity and four counts of usage of a lethal weapon improvement. Prison authorities said Chan was gotten from Clark County on Feb. 4, 2003.

Prison authorities said the two suspects have been determined however they did not release the prisoner’s names at this time.

Copyright 2018 KVVU ( KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights booked.

Nevada State College president: ‘We’re not just altering lives, we’re altering family trees’

contact) Saturday, April 14, 2018|2 a.m.

Fifteen years ago this spring, Nevada State College consisted of three classrooms, a library and 177-member student body in a converted vitamin plant.

Today, the school’s footprint has grown to 4 structures, and space is being prepared on campus for a $38 million education structure. Enrollment is at 4,200, and the school is one of the fastest-growing of its enter the country.

This week, as the campus prepared to commemorate its 15th academic year with a special occasion today, the college’s president, Bart Patterson, sat down with the Sun to look back at the institution’s history and discuss exactly what’s to come.

Patterson is in his 6th year as the college’s leader however has been included with it given that its creation, as the first general counsel for the school in 2003 and prior to that as an assistant counsel for the Nevada System of College.

Edited excerpts of the interview follow:

Exactly what are the most significant modifications you’ve seen at the college?

We started really built around nursing and education– the idea that we had to supply a middle tier of education in Nevada. It’s comparable in principle to the California system, which has the universities of California– the research study organizations– and then has the California states as the middle tier between the neighborhood colleges and those research study institutions.

So the entire principle is to have lower expense to the student and to the state to provide expert degrees of value. For this reason, the core start of nursing and education.

And we’ve stayed true to those roots, however a great deal of individuals do not understand that the college is meant to be a comprehensive regional organization like the California states. So we will not always be small like this. We’re master prepared for 25,000 trainees.

Now, we’re acknowledged by the Chronicle of College for the duration of 2005 to 2015 as the 2nd fastest-growing baccalaureate college in the nation. And in the past two years, our trajectory has actually been way faster than that.

The stunning thing to me is we had over a 70 percent boost in freshman enrollment this year.

It was simply phenomenal, and the majority of those students were standard, first-time freshmen.

If you go back and take a look at the history, nursing and education are still part of our vital core, however we’re starting to get a much more conventional trainee.

We are still really interesting nontraditional trainees, and we’re still a crucial transfer organization, and now we have this truly considerably growing freshman population coming right out of high school.

Exactly what’s driving that pattern?

Nevada State College is very student-focused in the sense that we work with individuals to teach and not to research. That’s the entire distinction in between a research study university and a state college: Teaching is our first top priority.

Now, that doesn’t mean you do not have good instructors in a university. You do. However the structure here is built around hiring individuals first based upon whether they’re going to be an efficient teacher, not whether they have a large research study profile.

That holding true, we’re really appealing to first-generation trainees who aren’t sure they belong in college to start with, and this is a place that’s extremely welcoming to them. Our present freshman class is 60 percent Latino.

What majors are tending to bring in trainees more than others?

Nursing is still the biggest pathway that our trainees choose as freshmen.

However it’s altering. So now we have a lot more trainees picking biology, psychology, business and criminal justice.

Education is still a huge degree. Nevertheless, we need more people to choose it.

Exactly what are the obstacles in that area?

The concept issue is that students aren’t picking mentor as a profession. We need to persuade trainees– and particularly members of the millennial generation– that this is not just a steady profession path however also is an opportunity to give back to the neighborhood.

That can be extremely appealing to this generation. So that’s where we’re focused.

To resolve that issue, we have actually hit upon the idea of teacher academies. So we’re identifying students in high school– and ultimately we’ll start reaching down to the intermediate school level– who have an interest in being instructors. And after that we’re supplying dual-credit chances in both basic education and in teacher education, and then mentoring likewise and getting them a connection to the college, so it’s much more most likely that they’ll select education and have college credits under their belt when they finish from high school.

Another huge obstacle to that from the college’s standpoint is we run out space currently.

The Nursing, Science and Education building was completed in 2015, and the Rogers Trainee Center was also finished in 2015.

So we got style cash in the last legislative session for an education building, which is now being designed. We have a $6 million match on the education building, and our hope is that the funding for the task will be contributed to the governor’s spending plan and will be authorized by the Legislature (next) spring. If that happens, we’ll have an education structure by the fall of 2021.

The entire job will have to do with $38 million for an around 60,000-square-foot building.

But we’re so fast-growing that we approximate that when that is constructed, it will only give us about five years’ development.

We’re starting our very first master’s of speech pathology program, which will be housed because structure. We’re taking a look at starting early childhood education and increase all of our education programs.

Our point of view is: Education is among our cores, and we have not developed it out as quickly as our nursing program.

What have you done to bring in such a diverse population?

We work in high schools around the valley. Seventy-five percent of our trainees originate from Las Vegas and North Las Vegas. Where we utilized to have mostly a Henderson population, and we still do have a substantial number of students from Henderson, but 4 of our five leading high schools remain in Las Vegas and North Las Vegas, from a recruitment standpoint.

Our entire focus as a college has actually been tailored towards a gain access to mission. It’s really crucial to the college.

Since we’re so concentrated on this first-generation, diverse population, we talk all the time about the principle that we’re not simply altering lives, we’re altering ancestral tree.

What are some of the other modifications being discussed?

I believe you’ll see the institution start taking a look at building a worldwide student program in the next couple of years, which will provide a various character to our school.

And I believe we’ll begin to enter more degree programs. For instance, we’re looking at beginning our first degree in the computer technology area in data sciences and informatics in the next 2 to 3 years.

Ultimately, we’ll begin to develop a lot more robust extracurricular experience. We’re constructing the plans for how we ‘d do that and fund it without needing to go to the state and request financing for things like sports and that example.

Exactly what are you picturing for domestic housing?

It could get approved and begun as early as this year, however more than likely by next year for sure.

We’re looking at numerous different alternatives, however it might be up to 250 beds.

Would that be funded by the state, through a public-private partnership or some other approach?

I’ll call it a public-private collaboration, but it’s mostly private-private partnership. With as much acreage as we have, we are trying to find tasks where the builder comes and constructs it, establishes it, handles it and financial resources it. It’s not under the college or state at all.

So it has to pencil out as a strong service strategy.

But we’ll be taking a look at a variety of other centers like that on this campus. We’re mainly looking for projects that have synergy with our trainee population. So possibly it’s a training spot for our trainees, or maybe it’s a work opportunity for trainees.

For example, we have actually thought about ideas related to assisted living, so our nursing students can work within the center or train in the facility. So it would have an acute-care component.

It’s one of the interesting things we have actually seen at ASU and the University of Arizona, where you have these facilities located near a college campus. Clearly, we’re all getting older, and gosh it would sure be great if you might live next to a college campus and go to cultural events and maybe take some classes and remain lively.

Possibly, could we have cross-generational interaction once again?

So to be able to determine distinct methods to create these neighborhoods is something I like about the college. We’re aiming to think outside the box in how we form things like this.

Couple beat 4-year-old young boy to death over spilled cereal, police state

Tahjir Smith (Source: Mark Anthony Johnson)
< img alt =" Tahjir Smith (Source: Mark Anthony Johnson)"

title =” Tahjir Smith (Source: Mark Anthony Johnson) “border =” 0″ src=”/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/16495165_G.png” width =” 180″/ > Tahjir Smith (Source: Mark Anthony Johnson). WILLOW GROVE, Pa. (Meredith/AP)– A suburban Philadelphia couple has been accuseded of murder in the death of a 4-year-old kid who was beaten for spilling his breakfast cereal.

The boy’s 19-year-old mother, Lisa Smith, and her 26-year-old partner, Keiff King, were arraigned Friday through video from the prison where they have actually been held since January.

Charges were filed after a recently completed autopsy revealed Tahjir Smith’s Jan. 22 death was the result of a violent, continual whipping, according to Montgomery County District Lawyer Kevin Steele.

A forensic pathologist discovered the young boy died of multiple blunt and thermal injuries after reportedly being forced to hold a push-up position for an extended period of time. When he might no longer hold the position, prosecutors stated his mother and her sweetheart hit him on the head and struck his body repeatedly with a shoe.

” Striking his body so hard there were pattern imprints on the kid’s butts when the police were finally called,” said Steele.

The boyfriend likewise confessed to throwing the 4-year-old under a scalding shower, which an expert later on found burned his shoulder.

Authorities said the autopsy likewise revealed old rib fractures, showing the beating that caused his death was not the first time he was abused.

Smith’s attorney decreased remark. A lawyer noted for King did not right away respond to a message.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, reworded or redistributed.